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Monday, May 15
 

09:00

Welcome and Introductions
Speakers
avatar for Schuyler Thorup

Schuyler Thorup

Executive Vice President, Overseas Operations, Catholic Relief Services
As the executive vice president for Overseas Operations, Schuyler Thorup oversees programmatic activities in more than 100 countries for Catholic Relief Services, an organization with a budget of more than $700 million and a staff of over 6,000. He helps ensure the fulfillment of... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 09:00 - 09:05
Hall 3

09:05

Telangana's Digital Transformation

Telangana is the youngest of India’s 29 states, formed in June 2014 from the norther part of Andhra Pradesh.  It is the 12th largest state and the 12th most populated state.  Shortly after its formation it won the 2016 Promising State of the Year Award by CNBC in recognition of its commitment and dedication towards the development of Telangana and its innovative policies with respect to the information technology, agriculture, irrigation and industrial sectors.  Telangana is the poster child for the implementation of the Prime Minister’s Digital India strategy – a strategy essential to Telangana’s vision of a vibrant and inclusive society.  K.T. Rama Rao will describe several of the innovative programs that are making Telangana a leader in harnessing the power of technology for its citizens such as:

  • T-Hub, a center that nurtures young dynamic entrepreneurs,
  • TASK, the Telangana Academy for Skill and Knowledge that is preparing individuals with the skills need to meet the demands of Telangana’s industries,
  • KTR, a program to make Hyderabad India’s first Wi-fi enabled city with the goal of increasing tourism and putting information at the fingertips of its citizens,
  • Telangana’s newest initiative to harness big data technology.

Speakers
avatar for K. T. Rama Rao

K. T. Rama Rao

Minister for Information Technology, Electronics & Communications, Telangana Government
Kalvakuntla Taraka Rama Rao (known by his popular nickname KTR) is a devout public servant.  His vision and passion for taking Telangana to the heights of development have marked his political career. He has been relentless in streamlining his portfolio and addressing the multi-dimensional requirements of the IT industry. Under his leadership Telangana has embarked on several innovative programs that are making Telangana a leader in harnessing the power of technology for its... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 09:05 - 09:30
Hall 3

09:30

Digital India: Development Implications of India's Evolving Digital Economy

Digital India is the Government of India’s program to transform India into an inclusive, digitally empowered society and knowledge economy.  It focuses on three core areas: digital infrastructure as a utility for every citizen, governance and services on demand, and digital empowerment of citizens.  The program  includes initiatives to issue digital identities for all citizens, achieve universal digital literacy and provide universal access to mobile financial and real-time government services through secure high speed Internet.  Jayant Sinha will elucidate India’s digital transformation strategy. He will share the successes, challenges and lessons learned to date. He will speak to the impact that the Digital India program has had on India’s economy and describe the steps to ensure that it benefits all Indian citizens. 


Speakers
avatar for Jayant Sinha

Jayant Sinha

Minister of Civil Aviation, Government of India
Jayant Sinha is the Minister of State for Civil Aviation, a Member of Indian Parliament and formerly the Minister of State for Finance. He has also been an investment fund manager and management consultant. | | Sinha’s prior business experience includes twelve years with McKinsey... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 09:30 - 09:55
Hall 3

09:55

Learning from India’s eGovernment Transformation to Advance ICT4D Innovation for the SDGs
The digital transformation taking place within the public sector in India as well as with humanitarian relief and development work across the digital development ecosystem sets the backdrop for an important discussion about key lessons and opportunities to advance ICT4D. On Monday, 15 May, during the morning plenary to kick off the 9th annual ICT4D conference in Hyderabad, India, Kate Wilson, the CEO of the Digital Impact Alliance will have a conversation with a high-level member of the IT Ministry of Telangana state. The discussion will explore India’s application of digital technology in government and the lessons it provides to others across the public and private sectors in our collective efforts to advance ICT4D innovation to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

India’s eGovernment experience will be explored as well as the strategy underlying both India’s and Telengana’s transformation in the application of digital technology and the role of public-private partnerships in bringing that strategy to fruition. Key questions will focus on what takeaways countries can learn from India’s experience in eGovernment transformation, what has worked well and what others should do differently based on the India and Telengana cases. Other discussion topics will focus on how the IT Ministry in Telengana sees their efforts tying to the SDGs and what additional support from other digital development actors is needed to support efforts to reach the SDGs. For example, what are the opportunities for companies, NGOs and others to collaborate with the public sector? Be sure to attend this lively chat for key insights and takeaways for everyone to apply in their ICT4D program.

Speakers
avatar for Jayesh Ranjan

Jayesh Ranjan

Principal Secretary, Industries & Commerce and Information Technology Department, Telangana Government
Jayesh Ranjan is the Principal Secretary of the Industries & Commerce (I&C) and Information Technology (IT) Departments of the Telangana government. He is responsible for developing policy frameworks, attracting new investments, identifying opportunities of utilizing IT in various government processes, and promoting digital empowerment of citizens. His last few assignments have been in the Industrial Promotion sector as Commissioner and MD of the Industries Department, Secretary in the Tourism Promotion Department, and Vice-Chairman of the Hyderabad Urban Development Authority (HUDA), all for 2-3 years each, and various rural assignments in different parts of the state for over 12 years, working in diverse sectors like Tribal Development, Natural Resources Management, Poverty Alleviation and other related Social Development Sectors. Jayesh is a member of the Indian Administrative Service (IAS) of the 1992 batch working in the state of Telangana. He holds a... Read More →
avatar for Kate Wilson

Kate Wilson

Chief Executive Officer, Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL)
Kate Wilson believes that digital technology products, new technology policies and updated business model practices are required to make transformative change in the lives of the under-served and decrease the growing digital divide. Kate joined DIAL in February, 2016 as its CEO t... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 09:55 - 10:20
Hall 3

10:20

Panel: The Intelligent Cloud and Inclusive Transformation

The intelligent cloud has become a transformative force within the Indian economy.  The convergence of mobile, cloud, big data and social media technologies has changed and improved the effectiveness of the way we work, enabled an agility that allows us to generate business insights and innovate at a more rapid rate and provided us new ways to connect with our clients.  Increasingly in India, government agencies, corporates, social enterprises and NGOs are coming together to harness these technologies for social good.  The panelists have broad experience in technology, consulting and social enterprises and will explore examples in education, healthcare and agriculture that illustrate how the intelligent cloud is fostering inclusive transformation:

  • iMerit’s digital data services and how they deliver to global clients in machine learning, AI and data analytics while creating livelihoods for underprivileged youth and young women;
  • Accenture’s “Skills to Succeed Program”, a partnership between Accenture and NGO’s that empowers youth, women and people with disabilities by training them in skills needed for high-demand job sectors (business process outsourcing, hospitality and facilities management, retail, construction and micro-enterprise);
  • The Cyient Foundation’s partnership with Government focused on increasing academic performance among government school children, raising the attendance of female students, and improving digital literacy which is increasingly essential to gainful employment; 
  • Microsoft’s innovation in cloud technologies, their applications for broad social impact, and their partnership with the Government of Telangana to use smart city technologies to improve the transportation, healthcare, public safety, water and energy services for its citizens;
  • The Government of India’s drive towards a cashless society and its impact on financial inclusion.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Shaun Ferris

Dr. Shaun Ferris

Director, Agricultural Livelihoods, Catholic Relief Services
Dr. Shaun Ferris has worked for the past 10 years for Catholic Relief Services (CRS). In his current position, Shaun focuses on supporting smallholder farmers along the pathway to prosperity, as part of CRS’ Signature Program Area for Agriculture. His work at CRS also focuses on building the agro-enterprise capacity of field staff, finding ways of generating value at the farm level through new combinations of skills acquisition, technology and market opportunity identification, and finding ways to improve information use and trading relationships. Shaun is currently working with a cross-agency team on generating agro-enterprise content for cloud based distance learning systems and creating farmer-facing business tools using ICT solutions. Previously, Dr. Shaun Ferris worked 16 years with the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research. Over the course of his career, he has collaborated with several major agencies on both short and long term projects including USAID, the World Bank, USDA, FAO, UNCTAD, DFID, and IFAD. Shaun holds a... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Prashant Gupta

Prashant Gupta

Principal Director, Cloud & Enterprise, Microsoft
Prashant has contributed to Internet innovation and leadership in the evolution of the ‘mobile-cloud’ connected paradigm empowering the planet in last 18 years. In India, he has led introduction of inclusive development constructs in partnership with Government. Prashant is the Principal Director at... Read More →
avatar for Dr. B V R Mohan Reddy

Dr. B V R Mohan Reddy

Executive Chairman, Cyient
Dr. B. V. R. Mohan Reddy is a visionary who has placed India on the global map for leading-edge engineering research and development (ER&D) services. Having established Cyient (formerly Infotech Enterprises) in 1991, Dr. Reddy pioneered the development of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions to serve international clients. Cyient is consistently ranked among the top 15 IT services exporters from India. Cyient is also the largest independent exporter of high value research and development... Read More →
avatar for Ajay Vij

Ajay Vij

Managing Director, Geographic Services, Accenture in India
Ajay Vij is the managing director for Geographic Services for India. In this role he provides strategic direction for the Geographic Unit (GU) operations and serves as a member of GU leadership team. In addition, he is actively engaged with shaping the Corporate Citizen agenda fo... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 10:20 - 10:55
Hall 3

10:55

Enabling and Strengthening a Culture of Data Use
Over the past decade we have witnessed a sea change in the use of information and communications technology in development.  The rapidly growing use of mobile devices by NGO field staff, government health workers and extension agents, and members of poor and vulnerable communities coupled with the emergence of increasingly digital economies, give us unprecedented access to high quality data in near real time – in hours and days rather than months and years.  How can we turn this data into information and knowledge that can drive better decisions – not only in understanding those approaches to development that yield stronger impacts – but in day-to-day operations of our field projects?  This presentation will discuss opportunities and strategies for taking the next steps in advancing an ICT4D strategy that leverages the power of data to advance our progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals.

Speakers
avatar for Schuyler Thorup

Schuyler Thorup

Executive Vice President, Overseas Operations, Catholic Relief Services
As the executive vice president for Overseas Operations, Schuyler Thorup oversees programmatic activities in more than 100 countries for Catholic Relief Services, an organization with a budget of more than $700 million and a staff of over 6,000. He helps ensure the fulfillment of... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 10:55 - 11:15
Hall 3

11:15

Coffee & Tea Break
Monday May 15, 2017 11:15 - 11:45
Hall 4

11:45

Advancing a data-centric ICT4D strategy
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Catholic Relief Services' ICT4D vision is to be a leader in the new era of extracting insights from information for program innovation, learning and adaptive management and to apply technology at scale to increase our reach and effectiveness with evidence that we are improving the lives of people we serve.

This session will describe our steps to execute an ICT4D strategy focused on data for evidence based decision making. The session will describe specific activities completed, results achieved, challenges encountered and lessons learned as we deepen a culture of data use and leverage data through innovative analytics to improve our programs.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Hellen

Steve Hellen

Director, ICT4D & GIS, Catholic Relief Services
Steve Hellen has nearly 20 years of information technology experience. He joined Catholic Relief Services in 2012 to lead a team focused on Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) and improvements to systems throughout the agency. He managed the implement... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.04

11:45

Empowering organizations worldwide with collective intelligence
Limited Capacity seats available

Though preventable and treatable malaria is still deadly for many children. In 2015, approximately 302,220 children under-five died from malaria; that’s 69% of the worldwide malaria mortality burden (WHO, 2015). Even these figures are estimates, as accuracy is challenged by fluctuating population denominators.

Akros and Ona have worked together to address this challenge as it relates to Indoor Residual Spraying. Together, they developed mSpray, a tablet based, GPS-enabled application, that reinvents data collection using mobile technology to collect and report data dynamically. By equipping spray operators with this tool, they can interact with the map, and mark nearby structures as sprayed or not sprayed after each visit. They even improve denominators by adding new structures as they find them. Through mSpray, spray coverage indicator is a better measure of spray effectiveness, as it constantly adjusts the structure denominator, based on up-to-date, on-the-ground information regarding which structures can be sprayed. This technology has proved effective in the IRS realm, by markedly improving spray coverage and thus protecting more children.

mSpray is a field support and management tool for household-level interventions, used during on-site operations as well as desk review of daily progress. These two aspects have improved data collection practices and intervention planning, by leveraging real-time data to actively monitor efficiency and find gaps in coverage. mSpray can then be considered both a workflow tool and a planning tool. That dual purpose has application beyond IRS, and even beyond malaria control.

We will be exploring how the same concept can be used acrosss Health, Education and Agriculture.

Ona is a social enteprise based out of Nairobi, Kenya and New York, USA. Our tools are used globally to improve child and maternal health, governance, agriculture, access to infrastructure, and government accountability. Our team has played a pioneering role in the use of technology for social impact. We have built and implemented solutions in the development and governance space for the past 10 years, including projects in Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia, Ghana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Pakistan, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, Syria, Uganda, and Vietnam.

We believe technology, especially mobile, is creating new opportunities to capture data. This allows governments and aid organizations to become increasingly data driven and accountable. The best tools result from real-world use and rapid iteration, enabled by user-centered design, agile development practices, and innovative partners.

We work with humanitarian, government, and UN organizations all over the world to address some of the world’s great challenges. Examples of our client work include: Developed and implemented the vote tallying software used in the 2014 Libyan Elections, Provided the data systems and on-the-ground support for the WHO-led effort to improve infection prevention strategies during the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, With partner Akros, developed the mSpray system, which was used for a national level malaria spraying program in Zambia.

Speakers
avatar for Erick Ngwiri

Erick Ngwiri

Director of Client Solutions, Ona
Erick is a dynamic international development, management and information systems professional with over 8 years’ experience in the development, sale and implementation of strategic information technology systems globally. | | He has extensive experience in analyzing busine... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.03

11:45

Moving beyond scale in digital solutions: what works and what doesn’t?
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

In this session, we learn from practitioners who have played key roles in successfully reaching the next milestone in digital solutions, especially past the 4-5 year mark of a service.  Challenges to reaching this stage may be a funding cliff, a leadership change, an expansion to a new market or location, new competition, or the entry of government into program ownership.  Deployments face common questions as they navigate transitions, with respect to their program strategy, business models, solution design, human capacity and regulatory policy.  BBC Media Action, the BBC’s international development charity, will discuss lessons learned about private and public sector business models from the national scale up of an mhealth service in India.  PATH, which leads the Better Immunization Data Initiative (BID) funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, will discuss from the country perspective of Tanzania and Zambia its approach and lessons learned to make the program sustainable, including transitioning to government.  Esoko, a private for-profit social enterprise connecting smallholder farmers in Africa to agriculture markets, information and finance through simple mobile and web technologies, will share from a private sector perspective its lessons learned expanding across geographies following the 4-5 year mark of its service, and the approach to its business moving forward.

Speakers
SC

Sara Chamberlain

Head of Information Communication Technology, BBC Media Action
Sara Chamberlain is a Tech Laureate and the Head of Information Communication Technology for BBC Media Action in India. Sara is responsible for developing mobile services for base of the pyramid subscribers and community health workers at scale.  Sara has been at the forefront of digital communications in the development sector for 19 years, including 9 years spent designing and developing mobile services in... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Johns

Melissa Johns

Senior Director, Insights and Impact, Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL)
Melissa Johns is the Senior Director for Insights and Impact at Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL).  In this role, Melissa leads DIAL’s overall research program, knowledge dissemination and influence agenda.   Melissa comes to DIAL after twelve years at the World Bank, where she shaped some of its most impactful knowledge products and the follow-on operational work driving change on the... Read More →
avatar for Hillary Miller-Wise

Hillary Miller-Wise

Chief Executive Officer, Esoko Networks
Hillary is CEO of Esoko, a pioneer in the use of mobile technology to link farmers to markets. Before joining Esoko, she led Grameen Foundation's mobile technology programs across Africa, and served as Country Director for TechnoServe in Tanzania, where she forged mobile agriculture partnerships with Vodafone and Tigo. Earlier in her career... Read More →
avatar for Chilunga Puta

Chilunga Puta

Director, BID Learning Network, PATH
Chilunga Puta, Director of the Better Immunization Initiative Learning Network (BLN), a program at PATH funded through a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, is an infectious disease research and public health practitioner with in excess of 20 years of experience wor... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.02

11:45

Beyond aid: ICT solutions for educating refugee youth
Limited Capacity seats available

We are in the midst of the worst refugee crisis since World War II. Syrian refugees alone now number a staggering 4.8 million, more than half of whom are children. Trauma, poverty, social isolation and a lack of access to education are creating a bleak future for a generation of youth. Helping young refugees and IDPs find a sense of purpose and a path to a better future is critical for their individual futures, their home countries and our well-being as a global community. Join NetHope for a discussion about how ICT solutions can aid refugee education at scale, hear about work that NetHope and its member organizations (IRC, Save the Children, World Vision) are doing in places like Jordan, Greece, and Germany.

Speakers
avatar for Frank Schott

Frank Schott

Vice President of Global Programs, NetHope
Frank Schott joined NetHope in 2005, and served as Managing Director of Global Programs for 11 years. In 2016, he took on the role of Vice President of Global Programs, where he oversees Field Programs. During his time with NetHope, Frank has worked closely with member agencies... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.05

11:45

Implementation of a weather forecast SMS system in rural Mongolia
Limited Capacity seats available

"Leveraging Tradition and Science in Disaster Risk Reduction in Mongolia" is a project with a goal to reduce the risk of dzud (a Mongolian term for a severe winter in which large number of livestock die, primarily due to starvation due to being unable to graze, in other cases directly from the cold) to herder communities and rural economies in Mongolia through on-demand weather information and increased local planning and risk reduction capacity.

This session will showcase the process of creating a national SMS system for weather and pasture information delivered directly to rural communities, with a review of technology used; national and international partnerships; challenges & obstacles; results of the system and lessons learnt.

Speakers
avatar for Erkhes Batbold

Erkhes Batbold

ICT & MEL Manager, Mercy Corps
Erkhes Batbold is the ICT & MEL Manager, overseeing the implementation of effective ICT for Development solutions at Mercy Corps Mongolia since 2011. He has worked with several programs in areas of Inclusive Economic Development, Good Governance and Environmental Stewardship with... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.06

11:45

Monitoring migration and internal displacement - filling the data gaps with innovation
Limited Capacity seats available

Over the past 20 years, IDMC has reported on displacement situations in 169 countries and territories around the world.

IDMC aims to increase his coverage and improve the accuracy of his displacement estimates by leveraging innovative technologies, tools and working methods, in line with our mandate and as requested by the UN General Assembly.

In January, we launched the #IDETECT challenge on the UN Unite Ideas platform to analyse “big data” to detect disaster and conflict-related displacement reported in the news and on social media. After mining one or more huge datasets of news, such as The GDELT Project, the European Media Monitor and social media platforms, IDMC will use Natural Language Processing (NLP) to filter and extract displacement-related data for subsequent human validation and supervised machine learning.

#IDETECT represents only one way we are exploring how innovative technologies can enhance and improve data collection.

In 2016, we began working on a new and improved version of our disaster-related displacement risk model. The new model is based on an analysis of hundreds of thousands of reported disaster events since 1970 across more than 90 countries, as well as simulated displacement projections for rarely occurring major hazards that must be accounted for but for which there is little or no existing empirical data.

In the future, IDMC will work with partners and use a range of techniques to detect displacement and estimate patterns from proxy indicators when no direct observational data is available. For example, by analysing satellite imagery, IDMC will estimate the scale of displacement based on the number of homes destroyed or the extent of land inundated by the construction of a dam.

In today’s world many internally displaced people remain invisible: technology can help ensure that “no one is left behind”.

Speakers
avatar for Leonardo Milano

Leonardo Milano

Senior Data Scientist, IDMC - Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre NRC – Norwegian Refugee Council
Passionate about how innovation can help solve humanitarian challenges, in 2016 Leonardo joined the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) to carry out cutting-edge research on displacement related to conflicts and natural disasters worldwide. Trained as a physicist, Leon... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.01

11:45

Overcoming obstacles: Implementing technology at Kakuma Refugee Camp
Limited Capacity seats available

160,000+ refugees, one hospital, five health clinics, 1,500+ patients per day, no internet, limited electricity, too many paper records, and one ambitious goal – implement an electronic medical record (EMR) and inventory management system at the Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya.

Join us as we explore the challenges faced during the implementation – from the lack of physical and telecommunications infrastructure to the complexities of replacing a paper-based system – and how cutting edge technology and creative processes were applied to solve them.

Vecna Cares' EMR is a hardware and software solution featuring a modular-based software platform, collecting health activities from each ward into a centralized database at the facility level. It is powered by the CliniPAK, a solar powered local server and power management system optimized for use in ultra low-resource environments. CliniPAK syncs wi-fi enabled data collection devices on a local access network using an internal wi-fi connection, enabling real-time data collection, management, and analysis that will link to a comprehensive camp level database to facilitate automated report generation.

The presentation will analyze our experience designing, building, implementing, and supporting the electronic medical records system at Kakuma. It will focus on three key areas with an emphasis on lessons learned and how our experience can benefit other practitioners. First, what are the challenges in adapting human-centered design and traditional software development life-cycle concepts to low-resource areas in remote settings? Second, what considerations need to be made when designing and developing hardware and software for use in a low infrastructure setting like a refugee camp? Third, how can organizations prepare for and successfully execute moving a complex set of operations from paper to the digital realm?

Speakers
avatar for Gillian Javetski

Gillian Javetski

Director of Partnerships, Vecna Cares Charitable Trust
Gillian is the Director of Partnerships at Vecna Cares, a technology organization that designs and deploys hardware, software, and implementation solutions to create measurable impact. Gillian has built her career working for organizations that build impactful technology for low... Read More →
avatar for Emily Taylor

Emily Taylor

Director of Communications, Vecna Cares
I wear many hats at Vecna Cares, a non profit company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. We design and deploy information management and technology solutions to create measureable impact, helping people in low resource settings live healthier and better lives. We build systems t... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.01

11:45

Bridging digital divides: Community partnerships & near to peer learning
Limited Capacity seats available

For ICT tools to be most effective in promoting sustainable development, it is important for disadvantaged communities themselves to have the capacities to develop and modify ICT tools, and for the tool development process to be integrated into broader processes of community building and social change. One of the greatest challenges in achieving this is not just having access to technology, but in overcoming the subtle barriers that poor communities face in learning how to use and control digital technologies. These barriers are often underestimated. Even in OECD countries, a recent study found, on average 25% of adults has no or only limited experience with computers, and only 30% were proficient at problem solving in technology rich environments. Since 1998, the Everett Program for Technology and Social Change at the University of California Santa Cruz has addressed this challenge through creating a model of peer-to-peer and near-to-peer learning built on University-Community partnerships focused on social justice and environmental sustainability goals. The Everett Program uses social enterprise principles to train undergraduate students to create innovative projects in partnership with NGOs and community organizations locally and internationally. The majority of these students come from disadvantaged backgrounds themselves with little or no exposure to digital tool development. The program is rooted in peer learning processes, developed by students themselves and that require students to collaboratively learn from and with each other. These peer-to-peer learning processes are then integrated into project planning, development and implementation processes with community partners. Community partners have found this approach of young people leading peer-learning processes to be effective in demystifying technology and overcoming subtle barriers that interfere with the learning process. This presentation will share lessons learned from our work and promote discussion about effective ways of building ICT proficiency. https://youtu.be/Ic_SADEdcHs

Speakers
avatar for Chris Benner

Chris Benner

Professor and Director, Everett Program for Technology and Social Change, University of California Santa Cruz
Dr. Chris Benner is the Dorothy E. Everett Chair in Global Information and Social Entrepreneurship, Director of the Everett Program for Technology and Social Change, and a Professor of Environmental Studies and Sociology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research e... Read More →
avatar for Yesenia Torres

Yesenia Torres

Executive Fellow, Everett Program
I believe in the intersection of social justice and information technology. My passion lies in blending the two in order to create comprehensive solutions for global problems like access to education. I'm currently building my technical skills in software engineering, programming... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.03

11:45

Digital inclusion of young aspirants
Limited Capacity seats available

In the field of education, with convergence of web, entertainment, and mobile devices, the focus on learning content has shifted from text-based to multimedia content. Eric Schmidt, former CEO of Google, held that the web would be driven by fast and personalized applications, accessible from any fixed or mobile device.

At Anudip Foundation we believe in the power of multimedia content that is accessible from multiple devices from any location. We also believe that use of technology helps us to reach and impact the lives of marginalized communities.

Anudip’s technology platform, Digital Inclusion of Young Aspirants, DIYA, uses innovative technologies to resolve poor connectivity through offline server syncing, and capture student information including all documents, payments, course progression and assessment, acquisition of new skills, matched placement opportunities, interviews and job details. Large amounts of captured data are managed to offer analytics for management, process improvement, and courseware evolution.

To build DIYA, in addition to in-house platform development, Anudip has leveraged open source Moodle technology, customized its interactive multimedia Learning Management System, and integrated it with the DIYA student lifecycle management system. This approach addresses challenges of traditional teaching, keeping the best part (the human touch) in a blended learning model that allows cost-effective skill development at scale. This model has been found to be more effective than traditional MOOCS platforms, which face the challenge of high dropout rates.

This presentation will demonstrate how Anudip's blended learning model helps bring more engagement, curiosity, learning efficiency, and tracking abilities for its students. It shows Moodle-powered mobile apps keep students immersed in content, and allows them to self-learn from anywhere, anytime, through any device.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. PS Gohil

Dr. PS Gohil

Manager, Software Development, Anudip Foundation
Dr. PS has led Anudip's student management platform development since June 2015. Previously, he held teaching positions in Computer Science at the College for Advanced Computer & Information Technology, conducting undergraduate and post-graduate level university courses for stude... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.05

11:45

Solar Media Backpack: Bringing multimedia to low-resource settings
Limited Capacity seats available

Imagine a remote, rural daycare or a school in Uganda, where poor road conditions, lack of infrastructure and electricity and weak technical skills prevent educators from using basic multimedia, such as projectors or computers as part of their teaching.

Now imagine a portable media center that does not rely on grid electricity, can be easily transported by foot, bike or motorcycle, comes with every piece of wire and equipment the user needs and is designed to be simple enough for even a novice user to handle. It can showcase videos, slide shows, presentations, and can also function as a Wi-Fi hub or a computer. It can be used to charge other devices, and works on solar energy.

This is the Solar Media Backpack (SMB), a rugged, portable and solar-powered multimedia center designed for remote and resource-scarce settings, developed by Plan International and a UK-based company Aleutia. It includes loud speakers, LED projector showing content from internal storage, folding solar panel and integrated Windows computer and/or external media - all packaged neatly inside a Pelican backpack, which also functions as the de-facto tripod for the projector. The SMB has been specifically designed to be easy to use so that even a person with little or no previous experience with technology can learn to operate it. A computer stick, keyboard and a mouse can be attached, making the SMB into a fully functioning computer. It can also serve as a Wi-Fi hub, and users can recharge their own devices like mobile phones from the SMB.

The SMB can be adapted for any setting, such as schools, community meetings, youth centers, health clinics, and so forth. The possibilities are limitless! The design is open source, and specs will be made available so that others can take the design and modify it to their own needs.

This presentation will introduce the SMB unit in practice, tell a bit about the process of designing & testing it as well as dig into practical examples how it has been used in the field in Plan's programmes.

Speakers
avatar for Bowden Percival

Bowden Percival

Digital Development Asia Regional Manager, Plan International
Sitting at the junction of technology and development, Bo Percival is a self-proclaimed ‘giant nerd’. Bo has worked extensively in digital development internationally in Education, HIV, LGBT rights, Youth Development and WASH. Bo has a Ba. in economics and marketing and is cu... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.04

11:45

Application of digital tools to accelerate community health in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

The Ministry of Health Uganda is currently in a process align existing and proposed eHealth programmes with the national strategy. The MoH is developing a Community Health Management System (CHMS) “Suite of Tools” to meet a number of key national priorities, including the ongoing VHT Revitalization Strategy and the Sharpened RMNCH Plan. The VHT Revitalization Strategy is still under review and development. It is expected that 8,000 CHEWs will be recruited largely from top performers from within the VHT ranks. The CHMS “Suite of Tools” is comprised of a number of tools including a smart phone based application aimed to be used by CHEWs (CHMS Android), and FamilyConnect directly targeting community based VHTs and health consumers (pregnant women and heads of households) through USSD and SMS. CHMS Android and FamilyConnect was developed by the MoH with support from UNICEF and USAID. An initial prototype of CHMS Android was developed in early 2015, and is being tested by approximately 750 VHTs in Moyo and Ntungamo Districts. As the VHT Revitalization Strategy is implemented, the CHMS Android tool will be employed by the CHEWS. VHTs will either use the more basic “FamilyConnect” USSD and SMS module where government and partner support is limited, or the more comprehensive CHMS Android tool where support is available.

The presentation will be on the process UNICEF has gone through for the last two years to insititutionalise the rollout of the two digital tools with Government of Uganda; initial scale up in 19 districts and plan for national scale up by 2019.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Muhereza

Alex Muhereza

Health Specialist - Health Information Systems, UNICEF
Alex Muhereza has spent much of the last six years working on the convergence of technology and development in Uganda. He has witnessed the explosion of mobile innovations in Uganda since 2011 during his work with UNICEF, WHO and Ministry of Health Uganda. While serving as a Heal... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
2.02

11:45

Enhanced management information systems to support public health commodity
Limited Capacity seats available

OpenLMIS is a global initiative to support the development of interoperable, open-source software for electronic logistics management information systems (LMIS). OpenLMIS was designed through a collaborative process by a community of international stakeholders and donors, applying the Principles for Digital Development, and the end result is a more powerful information system than any one country or organization could create individually. The vision of OpenLMIS is to encourage shared investment and benefit through an open source community, and to create a tool that is highly interoperable, scalable, and adaptable to the needs of country programs globally. OpenLMIS is deployed in six geographies, with an additional national implementation planned in July 2017.

The panel will share how OpenLMIS supports SDG3 by streamlining the provision of data to decision-makers. As an integral part of the country's’ overall Health Information System (HIS) architecture, an electronic LMIS system can decrease order processing time and provide increased visibility and reliability of data used for long-term planning. This data can also reduce the likelihood that essential public health commodities are stocked out at health facilities, making medicines available more regularly to those who need them most.

Many countries are now moving away from multiple systems in an effort to harmonize data collection efforts across the HIS landscape. This panel addresses those efforts, discussing successes and lessons learned in previous integrations between OpenLMIS and warehouse ERP systems, mobile data collection platforms, and health management information systems like DHIS2. The platform’s extensible architecture enables it to share vital information with multiple systems, encouraging intelligent decision-making and increasing supply chain efficiency. By making use of broader data sets to validate data across systems, and combined with on-the-ground capacity building, country users can identify and address gaps in forecasted commodity needs, bringing programs closer to achieving the SDGs.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Opit

Christopher Opit

Director IT/Monitoring and Evaluation, John Snow, Inc.
- Has an MSc In Information Systems Management - Has worked in the health sector for more than 25 years supporting research and public health programs - Has managed information systems projects, overseen pilot projects and successfully managed national scale roll-out of electro... Read More →
avatar for Mattias Wiklund

Mattias Wiklund

Director of IT Operational Projects, John Snow, Inc.
Mattias Wiklund, PMP joined John Snow, Inc. in 2012 as Senior Technical Advisor in Management Information Systems for the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, and moved into the Director of IT Operational Projects role in 2016. He provides global program management oversight for the in-house... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
2.01

11:45

OpenSRP: innovative features to revolutionize mHealth & primary health care
Limited Capacity seats available

OpenSRP is an open source mobile data platform to smartly manage the register data of frontline health workers (FHWs). It supports FHWs to deliver core interventions along the reproductive, maternal, neonatal and child health (RMNCH) continuum of care, as well as interventions and assessments for early childhood development (ECD). OpenSRP Indonesia has been deployed to several FHWs for the past 4 months with coaching for provider performance and service coverage; active feedback from the users has been incorporated. This has increased both FHWs’ performance and responsiveness and uptake of OpenSRP. Certain core components have proved exceptionally useful. First, the SMS texts for Service Reminder and Health Promotion (SRHP) are pushed automatically, not just to the clients, but also to the FHWs, and has helped increase on-time services at the facility. Second, real-time data sharing (RDS) has enabled multiple FHWs in the same area to coordinate with each other more efficiently. Third, the facial recognition and sharing (FRS) has been incorporated as a method for rapid client identification and data retrieval across the network. FHWs can easily search for the client’s record not only by typing their name/unique ID, but also by a rapid point-and-click face photo. The deployment of OpenSRP with SRHP, RDS and FRS innovations and active feedback on provider performance over 3 months involving 22 FHWs in intervention and 22 FHWs in control precedes a 6-month randomized controlled trial of OpenSRP with 40 FHWs that will cover ~5800 pregnant women and their children. It is expected to increase service coverage, reduce data duplication, facilitate simultaneous FHWs to monitor their clients, and provide coordination between FHWs on services provided to ensure optimal care and continuity for the client. Developing both rapid analysis processes and active evaluations that utilize the data from mHealth deployments is crucial for continuous quality improvement and sustainability of mHealth approaches. (supported by funds from the WHO-RHR & Qualcomm Wireless Reach initiative)

Speakers
avatar for Rana Islamiah Zahroh

Rana Islamiah Zahroh

Project Coordinator, Summit Institute of Development
Rana Zahroh is the THRIVE Project Coordinator of SID. She has graduated from KAIST in 2015 where she obtained a BSc in basic science with an emphasis on neuroscience. She had been appointed to be the Team Lead for various projects and organizations, and has presented her work wit... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
2.03

11:45

Using ICT4D to increase accountability in the delivery of malaria services
Limited Capacity seats available

ACCESS-SMC is a UNITAID funded project led by Malaria Consortium in partnership with Catholic Relief Services, which aims at scaling up seasonal malaria chemo-prevention (SMC) in the Sahel to children under five. The project is implemented in collaboration with the Ministries of Health in Burkina Faso, Chad, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Nigeria and the Gambia. During its life it will have provided approximately 45 million treatments to about 7 million children in these seven Sahelian countries. CRS supports the implementation of SMC in 4 of theses countries: Guinea, Mali, Niger and The Gambia where we have with the support of technical partners built an ICT4D enabled accountability framework based on the following principles:
 Coverage: Registration of beneficiaries
 Efficacy: Case Control Study
 Effectiveness: Post distribution survey to explore issues such as adherence and confirmation of coverage
 Resistance: Filter papers collected for PCR for resistance markers
 Safety: register details minor and series adverse effects.
 Acceptability: community dialogues and HH/ CHW surveys post distribution

Lessons to be explored include: To support transparent data use and inform quick decision making to improve implementation activities during SMC campaign days, the use of electronic data collection tools has the potential to simplify visualisation and support supervision and response activities on “quasi real time basis”. On a low cost device per district to capture the one page daily summary data would be a potential valuable tool to facilitate this process. This needs to be explored within the context of the DHIS2 rollout at district and health facility level to ensure integration of systems and the long term possibility of producing SMC dashboards within DHIS2. When approaching transition of SMC platforms and looking at the sustainability of SMC data management systems at country level it is pertinent to explore ways of integration of SMC data into existing information management systems such as DHIS.

Speakers
avatar for Eric Hubbard

Eric Hubbard

Regional Coordinator: Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning (ACCESS-SMC Project), Catholic Relief Services
Eric Hubbard serves the Regional MEAL Coordinator of the UNITAID-funded ACCESS-SMC (seasonal malaria) Project at CRS - implemented in Mali, Guinea, Niger and The Gambia. Over the past 15 years Eric has supported the design and management of system-wide capacity strengthening and... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.06

11:45

Utility of a call centre and social messaging for health communication
Limited Capacity seats available

Uganda, with approximately 75% of its population below the age of 35 years, is ranked only second to Niger among countries with the youngest population. Health programs are constantly faced with the challenge of identifying communication platforms that are relevant to young people. Social media and mobile messaging platforms have, however, opened up an interconnectivity that makes them an appropriate and futuristic channel for health communication. The Medical Concierge Group is harnessing the power of digital platforms to break barriers to healthcare.

The Medical Concierge Group Limited (TMCG) runs a call centre that provides access to doctors and pharmacists. Access is through voice calls, a two-way SMS platform, Facebook, Twitter, Email, Video chat and WhatsApp. TMCG disseminates health information on topical issues as well as provides an avenue for consultations and patient engagement. Through mobile based reminders and retention packages, the platform supports antenatal care, antiretroviral treatment adherence, circumcision drives and pharmaco-vigilance.

In 2015, TMCG had an average of 50,000 monthly users on its platforms. 80% of these were youths below 35 years with a male to female ratio of 60:40. We had 21,000 SMS interactions concerning circumcision, antenatal care and hospital return visits. WhatsApp and Facebook were the most popular messaging platforms with 80 unique interactions on average per day. Most queries centred on condom use, emergency contraceptives, HIV post exposure prophylaxis and assistance to locate required medical services. There’s been a noticeable uptake of the services by men and commercial sex workers that has been attributed to its confidentiality and privacy. The Call centre also provides a novel channel for community feedback on availability and quality of Health services.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. John Mark Bwanika

Dr. John Mark Bwanika

Founding Partner and Director, The Medical Concierge Group Limited
Medical doctor with 7 years' experience in HIV care and research. Founding partner of an indigenous digital health company that's leading the design and implementation architecture of various mHealth and e-health programs in Uganda; and soon Kenya and Nigeria. Passionate about he... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
2.04

11:45

CE3: An ecosystem approach to SDG promotion
Limited Capacity seats available

Brief and up-to-date:  this session will provide an overview of CE3, a community-based approach to SDG promotion, where  activities advancing SDGs are chosen in order to come together, rather than coming together to promote SDGs. CE3 in Northern Uganda promotes off-grid electrification, business development and global connectedness in an ecosystem approach founded on this community-based paradigm.  CE3 in Uganda is an activity of BOSCO-Uganda, developed in partnership with Notre Dame's Initiative for Global Development, and sponsored by Accenture with support from HP, Lenovo, The Fetzer Institute, the Loyola Foundation, and SunEdison.

~~~~~~~~~
CE3 is an ecosystem approach to promoting off-grid business development, electrification, and ICT-supported connectivity. A comparison of CE3 with Sustainable Development Goals reveals an almost complete overlap: less so with SDGs concerned with health (3), water (6), and life on land (15), but even in these areas of relative exception, related initiatives prove the rule.

SDGs promote integral human development, required for dignified life on earth. BOSCO-Uganda’s mission is dignified globalization—a mutual welcoming, reaching across divides sharpened by the challenges of conflict and poverty, of colonialism and negligence. BOSCO promotes this mutual welcoming and collaboration, this solidarity, by connecting people in ways that value and preserve what collaborators find to be culturally authentic. Connecting people around all the SDGs is BOSCO’s pluripotent mission as an organization with roots in ICT4D. During its 10-year history, these ICT4D roots have nurtured a dynamic but stable web of collaborative opportunity, and enabled BOSCO to welcome other partners—Accenture, the Notre Dame Initiative for Global Development, HP and Lenovo most prominently in CE3—in promoting an ecosystem approach to development in Northern Uganda.

This session will 1) outline the CE3 project; 2) trace its roots in BOSCO’s experience of livelihood-development response by local communities to the introduction of off-grid communications and energy resources; 3) explore the role that an ICT-network-supported social infrastructure plays in the development and integration of various facets of CE3-styled ecosystems; 4) highlight particular ICT applications and strategies that have helped resolve roadblocks to CE3 progress; and 5) forecast the role that ICT will play in promotion of SDGs on the CE3 model in Northern Uganda over the next several years.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Loughran

Thomas Loughran

Professor of the Practice, Physics, and Uganda Country Manager, CE3, University of Notre Dame
Tom Loughran (linkedin.com/in/tloughran) is Professor of the Practice in the Department of Physics at the University of Notre Dame. A founding board member of BOSCO-Inc., Tom now manages Ugandan operations of the Accenture-sponsored CE3 rural electrification project with Notre Da... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
2.05

11:45

Digital initiatives to empower citizens and against corruption
Limited Capacity seats available

Transparency International Kenya (TI-Kenya) is a non-profit organization founded in 1999 with the aim of a transparent and corruption-free Kenya for good governance and social justice. Through its regional offices by the name Advocacy and Legal Advice Centers (ALACs) TI-Kenya has embraced digital initiatives with the aim of empowering the Citizens to identify and fight corruption by reporting. Among them, is the Integrated Public Complaints and Referral Mechanism (IPCRM) Platform which has brought together four commissions namely; Ethics and Anti-corruption Commission (EACC), the Commission on Administrative Justice (CAJ), Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR), National Cohesion & Integration Commission to receive complaints from the citizens on issues of corruption, mal-administration, human rights violations and to foster cohesion. The other two agencies involved in the platform are Transparency International-Kenya and National Anti-corruption Campaign Steering Committee (NACCSC) who are involved in civic engagement on Anti-corruption strategies as well as receiving corruption related complaints.

Since its inception, the IPCRM has provided a platform for ease of receiving complaints and referring them to the relevant agency within the platform for resolution.

In scaling up the digital initiative, TI-Kenya also runs Uwajibikaji Pamoja (“Accountability Together” in Kiswahili) which is a web-based Integrated Complaint Referral Mechanism. This is implemented in three counties (Turkana, West Pokot and Wajir), in partnership with over 40 state and non-state service providers both at local and international levels.

These digital initiatives have enhanced partnership among the participating agencies, saving administrative costs of running an office and to facilitate enhanced access by the public to oversight complaints mechanism. This has also further given the Citizens an avenue to log onto the system through the Public portal and register their complaint creating convenience and protection in terms of identity as one can choose to report anonymously.

Speakers
avatar for Laeticia Klein

Laeticia Klein

Knowledge Management Expert, Transparency International Kenya



Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
VIP Lounge (2nd floor)

11:45

Distributed ledger technology in the humanitarian / development sector
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2016, the blockchain was recognized as one of the top 10 emerging technologies by the World Economic Forum. The potential of the blockchain and distributed ledger technology (hereinafter “DLT”) to deliver benefits is significant. DLT’s ability to remove the need for entrenched third-party intermediaries has huge disruptive potential. By replacing the traditional trusted intermediary with a new type of entity -- a peer-to-peer distributed network – DLT is poised to revolutionize a number of industries, from finance, to legal, to insurance. To the extent that international NGOs function as guarantors of trust – trust that the funds donated will be used for an appropriate purpose, trust that the aid has been given to the right beneficiaries, trust that the development work that was contracted for was done on time and as specified – then NGOs too are poised for disruption. 

Join Ric Shreves of Mercy Corps for a look at how blockchain and distributed ledger technology will impact the relief and development sector. Ric is the author of a recent Mercy Corps Whitepaper on DLT. You can download the full paper here: https://www.mercycorps.org/research-resources/revolution-trust-distributed-ledger-technology-relief-development

Speakers
avatar for Ric Shreves

Ric Shreves

Manager, Internal Communications & Knowledge Management, Mercy Corps
This is my second year at ICT4D. Both times I've spoken on blockchain (or, if you prefer, distributed ledger technology). Come talk to me about blockchain, DLT, or digital currencies. Just published a white paper on DLT in relief and development. You can download it by visiting... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.08

11:45

Multi-stakeholder collaborative for Sierra Leone
Limited Capacity seats available

In late 2015, World Vision initiated dialogue with the Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL) and other potential partners on the viability of co-designing a Multi-Stakeholder Collaborative (MSC) that would allow key national and international actors in Health Systems and Digital Health strengthening to work together in a much more consistent, collaborative and de-duplicative manner. The overall objectives of the MSC approach were set forth, as follows: 1) Establishment of a collaborative programmatic approach to support the GoSL to achieve its priorities related to community and digital health consistent with Government efforts currently underway; 2) Setting the stage for the Government to finalize and execute on a detailed, 3-5 year national level Community Health Worker (CHW), a Digital Health Implementation Plan and a sustainability model; 3) Positioning the collaborative programmatic approach as a model for other GoSL partnerships in health and other sectors.

A kick-off workshop in October 2016 was lead by the Ministry of Health & Sanitation, with contribution from the Ministry of Information & Communications (MoIC) and the Office of the President, as well as over 100 attendees from CHW, iNGO, local NGO, UN, donor, and private sector entities. In late 2016 and early 2017, the finalization, validation and field testing of Sierra Leone’s CHW strategy and curriculum as well as progress in digital health architecture and interoperability in line with the MOIC eGovernance & ICT Strategies for Health Care Delivery were accomplished. A National MSC Coordinator had been appointed in August 2016 and continues to guide the effort, and an MSC leadership team has been formulated to enhance collaboration between GoSL Ministries and Departments, as well as the broader international collaborative. Both the challenges and successes of this process so far will be summarized and related dialogue fostered with participants.

Speakers
avatar for Magnus Mordu Conteh

Magnus Mordu Conteh

Director of Global Health Programmes, Strategic Partnerships and Innovation, World Vision International
Magnus joined World Vision Ireland in 2011 as Health Programme Coordinator for the Irish Aid funded Maternal Newborn and Child Health programme that is being implemented through the Ministries of Health in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Mauritania and Sierra Leone. In addition to mana... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.09

11:45

The Big Discussions: Agriculture & Environment, Digital Financial Inclusion
Limited Capacity seats available

Transforming agriculture systems and driving smallholder financial inclusion through innovative and emerging digital technologies- the promise, benefits, and impact.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. David Bergvinson

Dr. David Bergvinson

Director General, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)
David joined ICRISAT in January 2015 to lead its strategy development to ensure science, demand-driven innovation and strategic partnerships come together to translate science into prosperity for rural families in the dryland tropics of Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. | | Prior t... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Shaun Ferris

Dr. Shaun Ferris

Director, Agricultural Livelihoods, Catholic Relief Services
Dr. Shaun Ferris has worked for the past 10 years for Catholic Relief Services (CRS). In his current position, Shaun focuses on supporting smallholder farmers along the pathway to prosperity, as part of CRS’ Signature Program Area for Agriculture. His work at CRS also focuses on building the agro-enterprise capacity of field staff, finding ways of generating value at the farm level through new combinations of skills acquisition, technology and market opportunity identification, and finding ways to improve information use and trading relationships. Shaun is currently working with a cross-agency team on generating agro-enterprise content for cloud based distance learning systems and creating farmer-facing business tools using ICT solutions. Previously, Dr. Shaun Ferris worked 16 years with the Consultative Group for International Agricultural Research. Over the course of his career, he has collaborated with several major agencies on both short and long term projects including USAID, the World Bank, USDA, FAO, UNCTAD, DFID, and IFAD. Shaun holds a... Read More →
avatar for Anne Hale Miglarese

Anne Hale Miglarese

CEO, Radiant.Earth
Anne Hale Miglarese is the founding CEO of Radiant.Earth, a Washington DC based non-profit. Anne has extensive government and private sector experience particularly in the GIS, Remote Sensing and Geospatial field. Prior to joining Radiant.Earth, Anne served as CEO of PlanetiQ, Ea... Read More →
avatar for Natalia Pshenichnaya

Natalia Pshenichnaya

Head of mAgri and mHealth programmes, GSMA
Natalia Pshenichnaya is the Head of the GSMA mNutrition, comprising of mHealth and mAgri programmes, overseeing a global portfolio of projects. Natalia has been working on implementation as well as research on mobile solutions for rural since 2010 across Asia and Africa.
avatar for Michael Tsan

Michael Tsan

Partner, Dalberg Global Development Advisors
Michael Tsan is a Partner in Dalberg’s New York office who leads Dalberg’s global ICT Practice and has recently helped launch Dalberg’s Data4Good analytics business, Dalberg Data Insights (DDI). Michael’s work on ICT and Data issues spans mobile access and internet infras... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 11:45 - 13:15
Hall 2

12:25

Transition Time
Monday May 15, 2017 12:25 - 12:30
HICC

12:30

Benefits and pitfalls to integrating technology into M&E activities
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

With any data collection effort, it is first crucial to understand what the data needs are, as well as who the end users are. Knowing this information will allow you to create a data collection approach and pick the best-fit methods to get the data you need, in the time allotted, from the people identified, and share it with the end users in the way expected. The best-fit methods may be traditional in-person methods, may be quantitative or qualitative, may lend themselves to introducing a technology-based solution, or may be a rapid appraisal method. Without knowing why the data is needed and for whom, the methods selected are not likely to give the information needed.

Though a technology enabled solution may often be a cheaper and faster way to reach more people, are you introducing bias into the sample you reach through the collection method itself? A critical question to ask yourself is: Are you reaching who you need to collect information from? Even if the cost per respondent is lower than other options, if you are not reaching the populations you need to get information from, then the savings will be much less important.

At QED we are always on the lookout for how to incorporate new technologies for Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning (MEL). Recognizing the pros and cons, we will talk about some of the disadvantages and advantages of a few recent examples. Audience participation is encouraged!

Speakers
avatar for Purnima Mehta

Purnima Mehta

Project Assistant and Analyst, The QED Group LLC
Purnima Mehta is part of the Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Department at QED, who are implementing partners to USAID. She works on various USAID projects across the globe and has Project Management experience. She is an Economics graduate from University of Surrey, England... Read More →
SY

Sandeep Yadav

Project Assistant and Analyst, QED GROUP LLC



Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
G.02

12:30

Building a yellow umbrella - A data system the same, but different
Limited Capacity seats available

Today, nearly 600 million youth are NOT in education, employment or training (NEET), diminishing their chances of a decent wage and career in the future. 62% of them are in South Asia, East Asia, and the Pacific.

Youth’s ability to participate in the labour market is crucial for inclusive, sustainable economic growth, but many possess neither the skills nor education the current economy requires. Gender equalities in the region’s labour market further enhance exclusion. Asia is estimated to lose up to $77 billion per year as a result of gender gaps in education and women’s limited access to employment opportunities. But how do we know our projects are having real and measurable impact?

After launching the Youth Employment Solutions (YES!) Digital Ecosystem in 2016, Plan International truly disrupted the traditional approach to both Youth Employment programming and the integration of digital innovations into YE projects. The YES!Digital Ecosystem enhances the quality, scale and influence of new and existing YE programs as an end-to-end solution of innovative and integrated components; each standing alone, yet working together to create truly unique learning experiences and insights.

Plan International understands that unless measured, impact is only anecdotal. By reimagining not reinventing, Plan international collaborated and co-created YES!ME, the only YE data system of its kind, one that is unique yet familiar, innovative yet intuitive; our Yellow Umbrella.

Embracing principles of big data and behavioural economics, YES!ME will improve the collection of reliable, high quality, high value data for making decisions and measuring impact. Beyond collection, YES!ME has powerful potential for data to bloom into engaging information that can be created and accessed by just about anyone.

Join Bo Percival to discover how a small idea is fast becoming a sought-after solution across the Youth Employment sector. This session will give attendees an insight into the user-led design process, the inner workings of YES!ME and lessons learned along the way.

Speakers
avatar for Bowden Percival

Bowden Percival

Digital Development Asia Regional Manager, Plan International
Sitting at the junction of technology and development, Bo Percival is a self-proclaimed ‘giant nerd’. Bo has worked extensively in digital development internationally in Education, HIV, LGBT rights, Youth Development and WASH. Bo has a Ba. in economics and marketing and is cu... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
G.03

12:30

eValuate 2.0 - An introduction
Limited Capacity seats available

"Section 1

1. What is eValuate 2.0 ?
2. The Vision & guiding principles
3. Benefits of eValuate 2.0 over 1.0
4. What new in Evaluate 2.0
5. Benefits of Commcare
6. Our roadmap and progress
7. Questions

Section 2

1. A pre-defined survey with the audience addressing
a. What do they think of new system
b. The field challenges that they may like to see addressed in the new system
c. The technology challenge that they may want to be addresses in the new system
d. What should we do to get maximum user penetration

Speakers
avatar for Alvaro Cobo-Santillan

Alvaro Cobo-Santillan

Senior Advisor MEAL/ICT, Catholic Relief Services
eValuate Business Lead. Main role consists in ensuring that the agency ICT4D solution (eValuate - http://evaluate.crs.org) is designed for global rollout to meet Monitoring Evaluation Accountability and Learning (MEAL) and Program Management needs in the field, regions and headqu... Read More →
avatar for Anusheel Kamle

Anusheel Kamle

ICT Project Specialist, Catholic Relief Services
Anusheel is a B.Tech in information technology, having 6 years of experience in software designing,development and implementation; 2 years in IT project management. He is CSM certified and work for Catholic Relief Services as ICT Project Specialist, managing a couple of ICT4D pro... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
G.01

12:30

Locating the epidemic: Harnessing geographic data for HIV epidemic control
Limited Capacity seats available

In line with its geographical pivot, PEPFAR focused its scale-up interventions in 32 sub-national units (SNUs) in Nigeria. This pivot is a result of PEPFAR 3.0’s commitment to focus investments on interventions with potentially significant epidemiological impact. Whether the 32 SNUs truly account for 13% of the entire HIV burden in Nigeria and the magnitude of alignment of community-based OVC program within the pivot remains unclear. This study was conducted to map the catchment areas of the comprehensive HIV care and treatment facilities in the scale-up SNUs to determine whether community-based OVC programs are being appropriately located and if not, estimate a measure for the misalignment.

Records of 26,365 PLHIVs were sampled from 167 PEPFAR-supported comprehensive HIV care and treatment facilities in 31 scale-up SNUs. The sample was calculated from the number of adults and children reported to be currently receiving ARV as at September 2015. An electronic data collection tool, survey123 for ArcGIS on android-based handheld devices, was used to collect data. Analysis of data was done using power pivot extension in Microsoft Excel 2016, automated into python and mapped using ArcGIS software

The study revealed that, 27.5% of all clients sampled access services outside of their SNUs of residence. The results show a statistically significant 3.5% more male than females accessing services outside of their LGAs of residence. Clients less than 15 years old tend to receive services in LGAs other than where they reside 4.3% times more than clients 15 years of age or older. Enrollment rates for clients residing within same LGAs as the health facilities into clinical care and treatment were positively associated with progression in time from September 2014.

The study concluded that prioritizing community based interventions using facility-based burden of HIV may be counterproductive for epidemic control. We recommended the boundaries for community-based HIV services to be reconsidered based on the catchment data.

Speakers
avatar for Oluwasegun John Ibitoye

Oluwasegun John Ibitoye

Technical Advisor- Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability & Learning, Catholic Relief Services
A public health professional with over nine years experience in utilizing research to inform programming and policy decisions in resource constrained setting.



Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
G.04

12:30

Beyond aid: ICT solutions for educating refugee youth
Limited Capacity seats available

We are in the midst of the worst refugee crisis since World War II. Syrian refugees alone now number a staggering 4.8 million, more than half of whom are children. Trauma, poverty, social isolation and a lack of access to education are creating a bleak future for a generation of youth. Helping young refugees and IDPs find a sense of purpose and a path to a better future is critical for their individual futures, their home countries and our well-being as a global community. Join NetHope for a discussion about how ICT solutions can aid refugee education at scale, hear about work that NetHope and its member organizations (IRC, Save the Children, World Vision) are doing in places like Jordan, Greece, and Germany.

Speakers
avatar for Frank Schott

Frank Schott

Vice President of Global Programs, NetHope
Frank Schott joined NetHope in 2005, and served as Managing Director of Global Programs for 11 years. In 2016, he took on the role of Vice President of Global Programs, where he oversees Field Programs. During his time with NetHope, Frank has worked closely with member agencies... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
G.05

12:30

Implementation of a weather forecast SMS system in rural Mongolia
Limited Capacity seats available

"Leveraging Tradition and Science in Disaster Risk Reduction in Mongolia" is a project with a goal to reduce the risk of dzud (a Mongolian term for a severe winter in which large number of livestock die, primarily due to starvation due to being unable to graze, in other cases directly from the cold) to herder communities and rural economies in Mongolia through on-demand weather information and increased local planning and risk reduction capacity.

This session will showcase the process of creating a national SMS system for weather and pasture information delivered directly to rural communities, with a review of technology used; national and international partnerships; challenges & obstacles; results of the system and lessons learnt.

Speakers
avatar for Erkhes Batbold

Erkhes Batbold

ICT & MEL Manager, Mercy Corps
Erkhes Batbold is the ICT & MEL Manager, overseeing the implementation of effective ICT for Development solutions at Mercy Corps Mongolia since 2011. He has worked with several programs in areas of Inclusive Economic Development, Good Governance and Environmental Stewardship with... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
G.06

12:30

Monitoring migration and internal displacement - filling the data gaps with innovation
Limited Capacity seats available

Over the past 20 years, IDMC has reported on displacement situations in 169 countries and territories around the world.

IDMC aims to increase his coverage and improve the accuracy of his displacement estimates by leveraging innovative technologies, tools and working methods, in line with our mandate and as requested by the UN General Assembly.

In January, we launched the #IDETECT challenge on the UN Unite Ideas platform to analyse “big data” to detect disaster and conflict-related displacement reported in the news and on social media. After mining one or more huge datasets of news, such as The GDELT Project, the European Media Monitor and social media platforms, IDMC will use Natural Language Processing (NLP) to filter and extract displacement-related data for subsequent human validation and supervised machine learning.

#IDETECT represents only one way we are exploring how innovative technologies can enhance and improve data collection.

In 2016, we began working on a new and improved version of our disaster-related displacement risk model. The new model is based on an analysis of hundreds of thousands of reported disaster events since 1970 across more than 90 countries, as well as simulated displacement projections for rarely occurring major hazards that must be accounted for but for which there is little or no existing empirical data.

In the future, IDMC will work with partners and use a range of techniques to detect displacement and estimate patterns from proxy indicators when no direct observational data is available. For example, by analysing satellite imagery, IDMC will estimate the scale of displacement based on the number of homes destroyed or the extent of land inundated by the construction of a dam.

In today’s world many internally displaced people remain invisible: technology can help ensure that “no one is left behind”.

Speakers
avatar for Leonardo Milano

Leonardo Milano

Senior Data Scientist, IDMC - Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre NRC – Norwegian Refugee Council
Passionate about how innovation can help solve humanitarian challenges, in 2016 Leonardo joined the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) to carry out cutting-edge research on displacement related to conflicts and natural disasters worldwide. Trained as a physicist, Leon... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.01

12:30

'SMS Quicklearns' enhances women's parenting skills in Sri Lanka
Limited Capacity seats available

SOS Children’s Village Sri Lanka empowers women at grass-roots through mobile technology using “SMS Quicklearns” to enhance women's parenting skills on the benefit of their children.

The feasibility study showed high mobile penetration at the grass-root level and being mainly fishing communities needed cognizance on various social skills to assure a safe and caring home environment for the children. Text To Change Programme disseminates information on child-care, child rights & protection and managing family income with a view to change their behaviour for the well-being of their children & families.

The content and technical support is provided by MobilTrain, but the topics are prioritised by mothers. MobilTrain gives face to face training to mothers on the topics and then messages related are disseminated daily through ""SMS Quicklearns"". This includes daily to-dos, questions for introspection, behaviour modification and homework which is monitored by the focus group leaders. Some of the findings during interim evaluation were: Better understanding of the emotional needs of their children, Improved communication and relationship with their children, learning English and motivation to learn as peer learning.

Thanks to the success, Text To Change was extended in Cambodia targeting youth employability. Supporting youth leaving SOS care to succeed on a competitive job market is one of SOS' great challenges. SOS Cambodia tackles the issue using what they all know best: their mobile phone. MobilTrain delivers tailor-made content in customized packets through Short Message Services, or voice messages. The teacher disseminates daily text messages-the “SMS Quick Learns”-and conducts virtual sessions through “Skype” on monthly basis.Split into three phases students improve their English, build self-confidence or learn how to prepare properly for job interviews, and how to live a self-reliant life as a young adult. More info: https://youtu.be/tmswdfd9ukg

Speakers
avatar for Maria Berenguer

Maria Berenguer

ICT4D Advisor, SOS Children's Villages
Leading ICT4D at Global level, responsible of the integration of technology into programmes to improve the responses to the programme participants. Managing partnerships with corporates, institutions and other INGOs to achieve the succesful design and implementation. And looking... Read More →
avatar for Divakar Ratnadurai

Divakar Ratnadurai

Deputy National Director/Director Programmes, SOS Children's Villages
With 30 years in SOS Children's Villages Sri Lanka, Mr Divakar Ratnadurai has an extensive experience in management teams and projects serving the most vulnerable population, children in need. Presently, he works as Deputy National Director and also Director of Programme, support... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.03

12:30

How data can transform the classroom
Limited Capacity seats available

The best ICT solutions start with a question. At CRS Iraq, we asked ourselves: “How can we ensure that conflict affected children access quality education and child centred pedagogy during their displacement?” The solution? Data! In order to design effective teacher trainings, the project team wanted to understand gaps in knowledge and skills as well as attitudinal barriers of teachers. The project team also needed data post-training to measure teacher knowledge retention and behaviour change for evidence-based reporting. To meet these data needs, the education team designed a tool that would transform the classrooms they were working so hard to improve. The teacher coaching tool — a tablet based tool designed to support project staff conducting classroom observations — enabled the education team to have real-time data on teacher performance. The tool also displayed tips and key messages for project staff to share with teachers during their after class coaching session based on the results of the classroom observation. This allowed teacher coaching to be more targeted and, therefore, more effective. While collecting data is important, it is not enough to ensure that it is effectively used to improve programming. To facilitate easy and meaningful access to this data, the teacher coaching tool was linked to an online dashboard of carefully designed charts and tables. The dashboard also included key user filters that allowed decision makers to engage with, and analyse the data in a meaningful way. (see dashboard at - http://bit.ly/classRoomobservation). By employing our user centred approach to data, project staff were able to design targeted trainings, reinforce child centred pedagogy and empower teachers through effective coaching. The result? Conflict affected children are accessing quality education in their transformed classrooms.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Nucciarone

Emily Nucciarone

Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning Manager, Catholic Relief Services
Emily Nucciarone is the MEAL Manager for Catholic Relief Services' Humanitarian Response in Iraq. In this role Emily ensures high quality monitoring, evaluation, accountability and learning for shelter, WASH, education and emergency relief programming that serves people displaced... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.05

12:30

Virtual support desk – The path to global impact
Limited Capacity seats available

The digital economy is characterized by unmet demand for trained staff and a large number of aspirants without job skills, and with no opportunities to prosper from that economy. This introduces us to the iMerit workforce where most of the employees are MAST graduates skilled by Anudip Foundation, an organization that works on training people coming from rural parts of West Bengal which remained untouched by IT. MAST had been not just about the skills training, but also an immersive approach to employer readiness. iMerit Global Service Desk is one of the modeled approach staffed with people who belong to these marginalized backgrounds getting an opportunity to work in the global market with the help of customized project trainings called Digital I-tech trainings at iMerit . We look at it as an accomplishment where we see the MAST graduates working in parallel with industry graduates & developing technically while servicing tickets on standard applications adapted globally. First Contact Resolution Metrics as well as the Customer Satisfaction Surveys have been the most important mechanisms for identification and continuous improvements in our goal to be a World Class Servicedesk one day. What we have achieved today is clear from our metrics that started with a 22-25% first contact resolution in Jan 2013 & in a year it was at a 60-61%. The Customer Satisfaction score since then had also been on a continuous increase from 90% to a 97-98% as of today. This is a dynamic process which evolves from inclusion to aspirations that finally leads to growth and enables them to carve a progressing livelihood in a digital economy.

Speakers
avatar for Monalisa Banerjee

Monalisa Banerjee

Sr Manager - Projects, iMerit Technology Services Pvt Ltd.
Monalisa Banerjee is Sr Manager – Projects and responsible for overall operations at the Global Service Desk. Monalisa brings more than 10 years of experience in project management from her work in telecom, web development, e-commerce, and applications testing. She has develope... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.02

12:30

Clinical decision-support for diarrheal disease outbreak response
Limited Capacity seats available

The emergence of mobile technology offers new opportunities to improve outbreak response in resource-limited settings. We conducted a clinical pilot study in rural Bangladesh to evaluate the impact of a smartphone adaptation of the World Health Organization (WHO) diarrheal disease management guidelines, including a modality for age-based weight estimation. Software development was guided by end-user input and evaluated in a resource-limited district and sub-district hospital during the Fall cholera outbreak season; both hospitals lacked scales which necessitated weight estimation. The study consisted of a 6-week pre-intervention and 6-week intervention period with a 10-day post-discharge follow-up. Standard of care was maintained with the exception that admitting clinicians used the tool during the intervention. Inclusion criteria were patients two months of age and older with uncomplicated diarrheal disease. The primary outcome was adherence to guidelines for prescriptions of intravenous (IV) fluids, antibiotics and zinc. A total of 841 patients were enrolled (325 pre-intervention; 516 intervention). During the intervention, the proportion of prescriptions for IV fluids decreased at the district and sub-district hospitals (both p< 0.001) with risk ratios (RRs) of 0.5 and 0.2, respectively. However, when IV fluids were prescribed, the volume better adhered to recommendations. The proportion of prescriptions for the recommended antibiotic azithromycin increased (p< 0.001 district; p = 0.035 sub-district) with RRs of 6.9 (district) and 1.6 (sub-district) while prescriptions for other antibiotics decreased; zinc adherence increased. Limitations included an absence of a concurrent control group and no independent dehydration assessment during the pre-intervention. Despite limitations, opportunities were identified to improve clinical care, including better assessment, weight estimation, and fluid/ antibiotic selection. These findings demonstrate that a smartphone-based tool can improve guideline adherence and a need for a randomized trial.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Eric Nelson

Dr. Eric Nelson

Assistant Professor, University of Florida
Dr. Nelson is a physician-scientist trained in pediatrics and molecular microbiology. His team develops desired feasible and scalable tools that draw on science and technology skill-sets to address fundamental challenges faced during infectious disease outbreaks. They chose chole... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
2.02

12:30

Impact of a stage-based mhealth voice call and animation program in MCH
Limited Capacity seats available

ARMMAN conducted a three year Randomized Cluster trial (RCT), supported by UKAID, in 250 villages in Osmanabad, Solapur and Washim districts of rural Maharashtra, India in 2013 – 2015. The aim of the RCT was to determine whether a) improved access to preventive information during pregnancy and first year of child’s life through a mobile phone voice call and animated film service (mMitra) and b) improved access to after work-hours home based investigation and care during the antenatal period and infancy through trained health entrepreneurs, Arogya Sakhis (ASs) leads to improved health outcomes among rural underprivileged pregnant women and infants. The RCT included three groups: Group A was the control group (84 villages). Group B included 83 villages (623 women). The intervention was mMitra voice and animation: stage based voice calls providing preventive care information were sent weekly/twice a week to the phones of the enrolled women through pregnancy and infancy in the chosen language and timeslot. The AS also provided monthly access to the enrolled women and their families to 8 animations on important pregnancy and infancy care topics. Group C had 83 villages (620 women) and received both interventions: mMitra voice and animations and home based antenatal and infancy care through trained ASs. A preliminary baseline study helped determine baseline knowledge regarding antenatal and infancy care and current health care seeking practices. Midline and endline surveys were conducted at the end of pregnancy and infancy respectively in the three groups using seven impact indicators in three categories: knowledge recall, behavioral change and health seeking behavior and user satisfaction with the home based care and mHealth services. Results of two indicators are detailed here: Proportion of infants who had an episode of diarrhoea in the last six months who received ORS was 82.39% and 88.23% in Groups B and C when compared with baseline (48.6%). 89.32% of the enrolled women received 70% of the voice messages and were satisfied with the content in the midline survey.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Aparna Hegde

Dr. Aparna Hegde

Founder, Chairperson and Managing Trustee, ARMMAN
Dr Aparna Hegde is the Founder of ARMMAN, a Mumbai-based mother and child health NGO. ARMMAN’s projects make innovative use of technology to achieve scale and have impacted more than 650,000 lives. Dr. Hegde is also is the Founder and Director of C.U.P (Center for Urogynecology a... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
2.01

12:30

mHealth for acute malnutrition in five countries: Key lessons learned
Limited Capacity seats available

Community-based Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) is a proven approach in the treatment of acute malnutrition. However, its effectiveness is undermined by poor adherence to clinical protocols, inaccurate record keeping and weak supervision systems. Currently, paper-based systems are used for patient records, summary reporting and stock management. A CommCare mobile application (app) for CMAM was developed to provide health workers with case management tools and job aids, such as response-triggered decision tree algorithms, automated referral initiating and tracking, integrated media to support counselling, and automated reporting. Development of application specifications was initiated in 2013 based on Chad national protocol. The app was contextualized and deployed in Afghanistan over a 2 year period (2014-2016), and a 2-year pilot project was launched in Mali, Chad, Niger, and Kenya in 2014. Final evaluations of the 4-country pilot were conducted in 2016 to assess the effect of the app on protocol adherence, monitoring, reporting, supply management, user acceptability and competence. Significant improvements in CMAM programming were noted in the pilot: improved data completeness and protocol adherence; improved defaulter/absentee tracing; and good acceptance of the app by beneficiary and health workers. Key lessons included: developing a single set of ‘global specifications’ for a CMAM mHealth application was not feasible given the notable differences between national protocols; country contextualization was complex and time consuming; field testing and re-testing with end users was vital; working with a technology partner who can accommodate flexibility in timelines and works in fragile contexts would be beneficial, including the provision of in-country support and timely remote support; weak CMAM services in some countries affected uptake of the app. Future priorities include linking the app to national HMIS systems and development of monitoring and reporting standards based on individual child level data.

Speakers
avatar for Colleen Emary

Colleen Emary

Senior Emergency Nutrition Advisor, World Vision International
Colleen Emary has worked in the international nutrition field for 15 years in both development and humanitarian contexts. In her current role, she provides strategic leadership for nutrition programming globally, including operational research, capacity building and external part... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
2.03

12:30

Using mobile tools for frontline outbreak surveillance
Limited Capacity seats available

Medic Mobile, along with our partners Living Goods (LG), aims to support community health workers (CHWs) and create a novel, community-based outbreak surveillance system. The envisioned system will facilitate door-to-door outbreak surveillance, provide decision support for CHWs and families, and enable rapid reporting of potential outbreaks.

Medic Mobile’s open-source, offline-enabled mobile app includes decision support for CHWs as they provide door-to-door care, shows an automated and integrated task list based on actions and configured rules, displays profiles and context for the people served by each CHW, and gives CHWs access to a mobile dashboard showing their progress towards goals.

In 2017, Medic Mobile will integrate outbreak reporting into Living Goods’ existing app for CHWs, automate sharing for indicator-based and event-based surveillance data, and co-design alerts and follow-up systems with surveillance units and the Ministries of Health in Uganda and Kenya. To our knowledge, this would be the first outbreak reporting tool embedded within an integrated, comprehensive CHW application and the first community-based surveillance system in either country to leverage mobile technology.

In the planned system, CHWs will be trained by LG to identify symptoms for epidemic-prone illnesses such as measles, meningitis, VHF, cholera, and AFP. CHWs will be able to report symptoms within the Medic Mobile app, using a new “action” made available on any community member’s profile. Reports will be forwarded immediately to the Integrated Disease Surveillance Response (IDSR) system or established surveillance contacts.

Medic Mobile, Ministries of Health, and our partners aim to decrease the time to detect those priority diseases, improve global health security, contain outbreaks, and protect the health of citizens. This presentation will discuss our progress in this project to date by sharing learnings and data.

Speakers
avatar for Jacqueline Edwards

Jacqueline Edwards

Chief Operating Officer, Medic Mobile
Jacqueline previously worked in partnerships and strategic initiatives in the Global Tobacco Control Branch at CDC and as a Senior Program Officer focused on public-private partnerships at the CDC Foundation. She has focused on community led program development across diverse ini... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
2.04

12:30

Digital initiatives to empower citizens and against corruption
Limited Capacity seats available

Transparency International Kenya (TI-Kenya) is a non-profit organization founded in 1999 with the aim of a transparent and corruption-free Kenya for good governance and social justice. Through its regional offices by the name Advocacy and Legal Advice Centers (ALACs) TI-Kenya has embraced digital initiatives with the aim of empowering the Citizens to identify and fight corruption by reporting. Among them, is the Integrated Public Complaints and Referral Mechanism (IPCRM) Platform which has brought together four commissions namely; Ethics and Anti-corruption Commission (EACC), the Commission on Administrative Justice (CAJ), Kenya National Commission on Human Rights (KNCHR), National Cohesion & Integration Commission to receive complaints from the citizens on issues of corruption, mal-administration, human rights violations and to foster cohesion. The other two agencies involved in the platform are Transparency International-Kenya and National Anti-corruption Campaign Steering Committee (NACCSC) who are involved in civic engagement on Anti-corruption strategies as well as receiving corruption related complaints.

Since its inception, the IPCRM has provided a platform for ease of receiving complaints and referring them to the relevant agency within the platform for resolution.

In scaling up the digital initiative, TI-Kenya also runs Uwajibikaji Pamoja (“Accountability Together” in Kiswahili) which is a web-based Integrated Complaint Referral Mechanism. This is implemented in three counties (Turkana, West Pokot and Wajir), in partnership with over 40 state and non-state service providers both at local and international levels.

These digital initiatives have enhanced partnership among the participating agencies, saving administrative costs of running an office and to facilitate enhanced access by the public to oversight complaints mechanism. This has also further given the Citizens an avenue to log onto the system through the Public portal and register their complaint creating convenience and protection in terms of identity as one can choose to report anonymously.

Speakers
avatar for Laeticia Klein

Laeticia Klein

Knowledge Management Expert, Transparency International Kenya


Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
VIP Lounge (2nd floor)

12:30

How ICTs have helped shape gender violence radio programming in Nepal
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2016, Equal Access launched Change Starts at Home - a media and outreach intervention designed to prevent Intimate Partner Violence amongst married couples in Nepal. The project is ground-breaking in many ways, not least in its aim to challenge norms and behaviors related to sex, sexuality, gender identities, power and violence amongst couples in Nepal. Initiating national, community & intimate partner level discussions on these very sensitive issues through the media is a huge challenge in the Nepali context and has been a steep learning curve for the project, but one where our use of ICTs has been key.

Through our implementation of the Change Starts at Home project, we have found the use of ICTs has brought immense benefits in three key ways. The first is being responsive to listeners. With the changes in technology – including smart phones & IVR platforms – we are now able to get data directly from listeners in almost real time, rather than waiting weeks for handwritten letters or feedback forms to be sent back via any unreliable services. The second is creating space for listeners to anonymously engage with the issues. Through our IVR platform we get over 600 calls a month from listeners who participate in our polls and leave long form messages. The data derived through the platform is used to inform & improve our radio programs, driving the messaging & content of the episodes we produce and ensuring what we do is relevant and resonant. Through IVR & CommCare platforms we are able to constantly monitor both the impacts of the program, as well as any unintended consequences or ethical issues. As a couples based intervention that deals with IPV, it is essential that we know what is happening across our 72 listener groups in real time.

In this presentation, I will focus on the ICT tools that we are using to both engage with listeners and monitor the project’s progress and some concrete examples of the challenges and benefits of using ICTs to gather input from the targeted audience and other listeners of the program.

Speakers
avatar for Shruti Shah

Shruti Shah

ICT4D Regional Officer, Asia, Equal Access International
Shruti Shah is ICT4D Regional Officer for Asia at Equal Access International, currently supporting Nepal, Afghanistan & Pakistan programs. Her expertise is applying open source, mobile and emerging technology in development context. With a Master’s degree in Information technol... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.09

12:30

Humanitarian ID Management
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2016, Cisco Foundation provided Mercy Corps with funds to conduct a landscape analysis of existing mobile tools, products, and operational processes used by various NGOs and UN agencies in support of beneficiary information management and distribution tracking within humanitarian programming--like food distributions or cash transfers.

While a variety of individualized component technologies exist, they have yet to function in a ""plug-and-play"" environment, where anyone can setup technologies in field without much support.

This session will summarize Mercy Corps findings from this work and also facilitate discussion around beneficiary registration and information management practices across various agencies and sectors. This includes topics such as biometrics, blockchain, data privacy, and data security in fragile contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Rosa Akbari

Rosa Akbari

Sr. Advisor, Technology for Development, Mercy Corps
Rosa Akbari is a Senior Technology for Development Advisor at Mercy Corps. In this role, she helps leverage lowest common denominator technologies throughout Mercy Corps’ programming worldwide. Rosa has worked at the intersect of humanitarian response & technology for the past... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
2.05

12:30

Machine learning in education
Limited Capacity seats available

Is it possible to predict whether students are at risk of dropping out of school? What if teachers and principals had analytical tools to look at all the data surrounding a student and could then predict whether or not a student was likely to disengage and ultimately drop out? Armed with such tools, educators and administrators would be empowered to reverse the trend and help more students succeed by providing early intervention to get students moving in the right direction.

Speakers
avatar for Prashant Gupta

Prashant Gupta

Principal Director, Cloud & Enterprise, Microsoft
Prashant has contributed to Internet innovation and leadership in the evolution of the ‘mobile-cloud’ connected paradigm empowering the planet in last 18 years. In India, he has led introduction of inclusive development constructs in partnership with Government. Prashant is the Principal Director at... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.08

13:15

Lunch
Monday May 15, 2017 13:15 - 14:15
Hall 4

14:15

How did a farmers' knowledge network morph into a market access service?
Limited Capacity seats available

Yikes! We are prototyping a mobile phone based knowledge network and extension service for farmers. But farmers seem to not want it. What are we to do?

This is the origin story of Krishi Janani. It started with a two-way text messaging platform that was built to monitor health care service delivery in Uganda. Another potential use case would be to utilize the software to build out a knowledge network that will serve as a local-language extension service in India. The prototype launched in 2015. Farmers can text message their questions about everything from input application to pest attacks. The network will send them answers and solutions. All of it will be captured in a central data repository. Other farmers can review available solutions, rate their effectiveness, suggest tweaks, and keep building out the repository. Brilliant idea. Or so we thought.

There was only one problem. Farmers did not want to pay for it. Why? Krishi Janani scaled back, to relaunch as farmers’ trading company in 2016. How did we discover this idea? We scaled back our initial ambitious vision, changed the technology stack, opened business centers in villages, and created rural infrastructure. None of this was planned. So, how did we fare?

Come to the session to find out how a technology project morphed into an innovative business model taking measured strides towards sustainability and profitability.

Speakers
avatar for Usha Devi Venkatachalam

Usha Devi Venkatachalam

CEO & CTO, Krishi Janani
CEO & CTO of Krishi Janani, a social enterprise in India that is aggregating farmers’ purchasing power to reduce expenses. CEO of Appropriate IT, a social enterprise harnessing technology to advance social justice, equitable access, & inclusive international development. 15+ ye... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.01

14:15

Plantwise: Using data to help prevent crop losses
Limited Capacity seats available

Plantwise is a global programme, led by CABI, to increase food security and improve rural livelihoods by reducing crop losses. In 34 countries across Africa, Asia and the Americas, we help establish networks of local plant clinics, where farmers can get agricultural advice on managing pests and diseases. Plant clinics are reinforced by the Plantwise Knowledge Bank, an online gateway to diagnostic resources and pest management advice. Using a specially developed app, the Knowledge Bank also collects data about the farmers visiting plant clinics, as well as their crops and the pests affecting them.

We use this data to inform and quality-control the advice given by plant doctors, but crucially we also share it with our local partners. Our research partners then use the data to develop new pest management advice tailored to the local context; while government partners can use the data to inform regulatory and policy-making decisions. While there are other projects that simply push information to farmers, and still others that only gather data, Plantwise’s key innovation is this uniquely cyclical flow of information. As a result everyone, from plant doctors and farmers to government agencies and researchers, benefits from improved knowledge.

By sharing data with relevant partners, we strengthen national plant health systems from within, helping to establish frameworks for in-country pest surveillance and early warning systems. This empowers countries to respond quickly to emerging plant health problems. For example, in Sri Lanka, a new banana pest was first reported at a plant clinic, which meant that national plant protection procedures could be activated within days, preventing major losses. Together with our partners, we help farmers to lose less and feed more.

Speakers
avatar for Malvika Chaudhary

Malvika Chaudhary

Plantwise Regional Coordinator, Asia, CABI
Dr Chaudhary has over 20 years of experience in implementing Integrated Pest Management (IPM) as part of development projects, as well as in the research and development of bio pesticides. Prior to joining CABI in 2013, she worked for Pest Control India and BioControl Research La... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.04

14:15

Smart & safe agriculture
Limited Capacity seats available

eFresh is using Digital Platform for Agriculture and technology tools for promoting Smart Agriculture. eFresh supporting safe and sustainable agriculture through Good Agricultural Practices by promoting GAP demo farms in important crop production centers. eFresh initiatives are supported by National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development , ICRISAT-ABI, German Development Cooperation, etc..,

Challenges for Agricultural Development in India - Low Productivity of agricultural commodities Ex: Chickpea production of 0.9 MT per hectare versus 2.8 in China. High Post harvest Losses due to poor farm infrastructure - Losses of 20 – 30%. Farmers receive only a small portion of the Consumer Price - 10 to 23% versus 64 to 81 % in Developed Economies. Complicated Supply Chains increasing transactional costs - Increase by 25 to 40%. Lack of awareness on technologies and GAP - Dependent on dealers for advise

eFresh initiatives:

“One-stop solution for knowledge and market access for the farmers” through its business verticals
1) Farmers Development Center activities – Sale of Agri inputs, Connecting farm produce to market, Customer hiring services for large farm equipment, Soil & Water testing, Provision of Advisory services , Farmers skill development and Good Agricultural Practices for promoting the cultivation of safe food at farm level
2) Digital Platform for Agriculture - One Stop Source of Knowledge in Agri Domain with Innovative Features. Supports in transforming rural India into a Digitally Empowered Agricultural Knowledge Economy. Enhance efficiency in agricultural production through skill development and electronic delivery of suitable information. Timely information and advisory to farmers Crop Technology, Weather updates, Commodity Prices, Advisory services, Govt. support schemes, Modern Technologies, Repository of success stories.
3) Market Linkage - Connecting farm produce to market through – Consolidation, Better Price, Primary processing, Packing, Sales

Speakers
avatar for Srihari Kotela

Srihari Kotela

Smart & Safe Agriculture, eFresh Agribusiness solutions (p) Ltd
Two decades of experience in Quality and Food Safety initiatives in the entire Agri supply chain starting from the farmers. Facilitated Indian farmers exposure to European Retail Parties Good Agricultural Practices for the first time in India in the year 2002 for the production... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.03

14:15

The effectiveness of ICT4D in baseline processes
Limited Capacity seats available

The implementation of ICT in the baseline survey for PROGRESA Caribe (Program for rural business management, health, and environment), was decisive and effective, in terms of reducing the time in data collection, as well as its processing, in order to generate valuable information for decision-making.

Our Approach with PROGRESA is to support the small and medium producers of the Cacao and Livestock value chains on the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua, who face problems of low yields, low levels of knowledge of best practices for the management of both: Cacao plantations and Livestock.

Through the ICT we were able to collect information on productive yields, practices implemented before the project, production costs, socio-demographic information, as well as food security. All through a set of tools facilitated by the ICT strategy.

This resulted in crucial information to make decisions, where we could define the type of intervention to be implemented, improved Cocoa varieties with better productive potential, type of nutrition and pastures for livestock. All this within a record time of three months.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Valdivia

Thomas Valdivia

MEAL-ICT4D Advisor, Catholic Relief Services
I am Tomás Valdivia, originally from Nicaragua and an architect by profession. I Started at CRS as M&E advisor on value chains projects eight years ago. Nowadays I work for the MEAL-ICT4D area,supporting the noble mission and the CRS program for Nicaragua.


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.02

14:15

CRS Haiti program adoption of technology
Limited Capacity seats available

This powerful tool named Power BI is using to centralize data from Iformbuilder, CommCare and any table indicator in format excel file. This presentation will point every successful realization make by the programming staff during their program monitoring. When we want make data talk, in CRS Haiti we make it visible on Map with ArcGIS, Interpret it through a Graph and gross table summary with a reporting application. We will present you the process map of our information system from data collection (Mobile device) to Reporting.

Speakers
avatar for Fredson Joseph

Fredson Joseph

MEAL/ICT4D Officer, Catholic Relief Services
Hi there, my name Fredson Joseph, I have bachelor in Software engineering and I work for CRS for almost 6 years in the field of ICT4D/MEAL.


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.02

14:15

Mobile data collection and machine learning
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

In recent years, mobile surveys and data collection capabilities have increased alongside rapidly expanding mobile phone penetration in the developing world. And with this trend, there has been a proliferation of small firms that have entered this space. By allowing development projects to quickly capture hard-to-gather data through SMS, IVR, apps, and other tools, these firms offer can change the way we execute development projects around the world.

At the same time, mobile data-collection is a sector in flux -- these new companies are rapidly iterating their business models, expanding and contracting their geographical reach, and merging with one another. New data analysis tools like machine learning also have the potential to complement the capabilities that these companies have created.

What is the future of this sector? How will policy changes among donors and large implementers influence the evolution of this sector? How will they cope with shifts in technology, both in terms of capabilities like machine learning, but also as internet access expands in developing countries, providing millions with free access?

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Burns

Christopher Burns

Sr. Coordinator, Digital Development for Feed the Future, USAID
Christopher Burns is the Senior Coordinator, Digital Development for Feed the Future. In this capacity, he leads a nimble technical team within the U.S. Global Development Lab, working alongside the Bureau for Food Security, to integrate a suite of digital technologies into Feed... Read More →
avatar for Matt McNabb

Matt McNabb

CEO, First Mile Geo
Matt McNabb is CEO & Co-Founder of First Mile Geo, a global on-demand data collection company which enables users to craft surveys, task trained locals to collect data, and analyze results in real time. For the past decade he has advised senior leaders in US and UK governments, W... Read More →
avatar for Deepak Menon

Deepak Menon

Hub Manager-Akvo South Asia, Akvo Foundation
Deepak Menon heads Akvo's South Asia team.
avatar for Melissa Persaud

Melissa Persaud

Director of Partnerships, VOTO Mobile
Melissa Persaud is Director of Partnerships at VOTO Mobile, a global mobile engagement social enterprise. In her role, she builds and maintains partnerships with impact-oriented organizations in order to provide better choices for more voices around the globe. Personally, Melissa... Read More →
avatar for Anand Varghese

Anand Varghese

Senior ICT Specialist, DAI
During his eight-year career as a specialist in international development and conflict management, Anand Varghese has managed complex operations with a commitment to using information and communications technology (ICT) tools to create peaceful social change around the world. Ana... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.06

14:15

Technologies options for beneficairy accountability
Limited Capacity seats available

CRS recently launched policies and procedures to enhance a culture of Monitoring, Evaluation, Accountability and Learning within the agency. One of the procedures explicitly mandated all projects to set up and implement beneficiary feedback and response mechanisms. This would in turn enhance participation of beneficiaries in the project cycle and CRS accountability and improve the practice of informed decision making.

To accomplish this 'new' mandate, CRS country programs resorted to the numerous opportunities provided by technology in various process of beneficiary accountability processes. Some of the technologies used include SMS, visualization and use of a dedicated phone line to gather feedback from communities and other stakeholders, use of social media, internal chatter groups and webinars to disseminate and encourage use learning and adaptive management within projects.

In all these processes, country programs have gathered a package of ICTs that can help enhance accountability to beneficiaries particularly focusing on collecting and communicating feedback. Country teams have seen the value of technologies and appreciate the role of effective management in ensuring success of any project, especially ICT4Accountability projects.

The presentation will focus on a range of technologies employed by CRS in fostering accountability to beneficiaries and the success and challenges encountered during the use of these technologies.

This presentation would be conducted with colleagues from the Accountability Community of Practice and GKIM.

Speakers
avatar for SIKU Eric-Simeon

SIKU Eric-Simeon

DRC Protection and Gender adviser / HRD Protection Mainstreaming focal point, Catholic Relief Services
I have been working with CRS since April 2014. I have started in DR Congo were I was working on integrating Protection Mainstreaming in DRC programming. In particular we have settled a CP feedback mechanism with a free toll hotline and an IT platform to manage and follow up on feedback and responses. Since March 2017... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.05

14:15

Digital transformation in agri sector and the role of commercial players
Limited Capacity seats available

The GSMA mAgri Programme forges partnerships between mobile operators, technology providers and agricultural organisations. We support scalable commercial mobile services that impact smallholder farmers and the agricultural industry at large. Our mission is to advance the productivity and profitability of smallholder farmers and the agricultural industry at large through scalable and commercial mobile services.

Over the last few years GSMA has been working with six mobile operators to support the launch and scale of agricultural value-added services (Agri VAS). In just over two years, leveraging findings from user experience (UX) design, business intelligence (BI), and customer feedback and sharing knowledge with each other, the product teams developed services that cumulatively reached more than three million registered users worldwide.



Some of the key findings to be presented include:

- The potential of Agri VAS to drive behaviour change is proven by power users reporting significantly more on-farm changes than comparable non-users (e.g. planting, land management, harvesting) – over one million users are estimated to have made changes globally.

- Dedication to UX, drawing on customer feedback and behavioural data from BI, ensured high acquisitions and user engagement. The six Agri VAS services reached three million registered users worldwide, almost 60% of whom were active in December 2016 due to iterative and user-centric approach to product evolution.

- Successful services require holistic product team structure - a core team of dedicated staff, as well as cross functional links into other departments (marketing, BI, technology, sales and distribution). A high degree of ownership from MNOs results in high activity and user engagement rates. Those who led UX research internally and empowered their team to make service design decisions based on lessons in the field are more likely to get foundational issues, like design and requirement specifications, right.

This session will also explore the trends and role of digital in agriculture beyond extension

Speakers
avatar for Natalia Pshenichnaya

Natalia Pshenichnaya

Head of mAgri and mHealth programmes, GSMA
Natalia Pshenichnaya is the Head of the GSMA mNutrition, comprising of mHealth and mAgri programmes, overseeing a global portfolio of projects. Natalia has been working on implementation as well as research on mobile solutions for rural since 2010 across Asia and Africa.


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.04

14:15

Using mobile payment for wage payment to workers in rural employment
Limited Capacity seats available

During 2013-2016, a pilot covering 2 blocks in rural Odisha was implement to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of using mobile retailer network to disburse wages using mobile payment to MGNREGS workers. The pilot led to successful and timely disbursal of wages to the workers, leading to beneficiary satisfaction on mobile payment. However, it also posed challenges for many workers due to their limited adaption of mobile user interfaces and limited individual ownership of mobile handsets. Despite these challenges, workers were keen to continuing using mobile payment method to get their wages in and around their villages. The pilot posed several organizational and environmental challenges. The presentation talks about those challenges and recommends solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Soumen Das

Soumen Das

Senior Delivery Manager, Socialwell Technologies
Soumen Das, Sr. Delivery Manager, Socialwell Technologies is a transactional banking consultant. His subject areas are mobile payment, payment APIs.Soumen has worked in banking software industries and ICT design and project management.


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.05

14:15

Empowering drought-affected families via e-vouchers in Mozambique
Limited Capacity seats available

Across the Southern Africa region, the effects of an El Niño-induced drought have ravaged crops and cattle, limiting food supplies and pushing millions further into hunger and malnutrition. Families have been forced to adopt negative coping strategies, such as school dropout and child labour.

Mozambique has an estimated 2.3 million in need of food assistance , with budgets struggling to keep pace . As such, the need for efficient, effective and accountable programmes are vital. In the provinces of Tete, Sofala and Gaza, the Consorcio Humanitario de Mocambique, consisting of World Vision, Master Card, Food for the Hungry and the Government, is leveraging e-vouchers to deliver life-saving support to the most vulnerable children, families and communities until March, 2017 . With funding from DFID, the project is targeting 13,007 drought-affected families with food security and resilience efforts.

The e-voucher programme, which has leveraged World Vision’s Last Mile Mobile Solutions and MCAid , has realised the following benefits:

1. Enriched beneficiary dignity and agency to purchase desired commodities
2. Boosted local economy where registered traders are guaranteed income
3. Expanded financial inclusion & literacy for beneficiaries engaging financial institutions
4. Enhanced logistical efficiencies in the distribution and redemption of e-vouchers
5. Improved real-time M&E to discern beneficiary needs, market trends and diet diversity
6. Strengthened private-sector partnerships with financial institutions and local traders

World Vision’s presentation will showcase better humanitarian practices in e-voucher programming, technology and private-sector partnerships, in order to encourage more efficient and effective responses to food security crises.

Speakers
avatar for Keith Chibafa

Keith Chibafa

Head of Business Development (LMMS), World Vision International
Keith Chibafa joined WV International in 2010 after a career in the private sector. He is responsible for overseeing World Vision International’s (WVI) efforts to collaborate with key local and international entities interested in the implementation and execution of WVI’s Las... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
2.01

14:15

Transforming lives through technology in humanitarian aid & disaster relief
Limited Capacity seats available

All stakeholders in The Humanitarian Aid & Disaster Relief Disbursement value chain are continually challenged with bringing about Transparency & Accountability in the benefits disbursement process.

I will be talking about how leveraging technology can transform lives while bringing about Transparency and Accountability in various forms of aid and relief disbursement, spanning from disbursement of food, cash, non-food-items to cash transfers to communities that are adversely affected by war, natural disasters and other calamities

Speakers
avatar for Sailesh Savani

Sailesh Savani

FOUNDER & CEO, COMPULYNX LTD
I am passionate about transforming lives of people who have been displaced or whose lives have been disrupted for no fault of their own. | | I am a B.Com from Bombay Uni, a Dip Comp Sc. Bombay & Entrepreneur’s Master Program at MIT Boston. I've been in Tech industry for... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
2.02

14:15

e/mLearning roadmap: Discover steps, concepts & tools for e/mLearning
Limited Capacity seats available

Implementing an e/mLearning project takes resources, human capacity, planning and time. The session describes the e/mLearning journey and the steps, concepts and tools along the way. These steps include assessment, requirements analysis and specifications, content development, technology tools, tracking learning, professional development and M&E. It looks at the intersections where they meet, are combined or taken to integrate into a holistic process for technology and learning.

For content development, for example, the session will discuss the elements of creating content. One element may be adapting print material to eLearning. eLearning is concise, engaging and uses chunks of material. The session will review sample print content and determine what to include into a digital format: is the content something that the learner ""needs to know"" or is it ""nice to know?” The technology for the learning application will be demonstrated. Participants will explore the contents in a health worker training module and what data can be collected from the backend to review how the learner is performing. The session will further discuss how to integrate technology in learning.

Jhpiego is currently implementing e/mLearning projects in countries such as Ethiopia, Ghana and Zambia. The steps are similar for all eLearning projects, but the path that they go on are slightly different. In Ghana, for example, Jhpiego is supporting the Ministry of Health’s eLearning efforts at midwifery and nursing schools with developing eLearning modules, integrating technology into the curriculum and deploying e/mlearning systems.To improve and update skills for health providers in Zambia, Jhpiego is supporting the Zambian Ministry of Health's in-service training program by using a blended learning approach which combines on-site mentorship at the facility with eLearning.

The session provides country experiences, concepts for e/mLearning and lessons learned implementing e/mLearning.

Speakers
avatar for Jodi Lis

Jodi Lis

Senior Technical Advisor, Jhpiego
Jodi Lis is a Senior Technical Advisor at Jhpiego. She is part of the Digital Health team, focusing on the use of technology in learning. She has 20 years experience designing and implementing activities to integrate technology, eLearning and digital tools into workforce developm... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
2.04

14:15

Leveraging technology for global reading
Limited Capacity seats available

Worldreader is a global nonprofit that believes everyone can be a reader. The nonprofit provides children, students, and their families free access to its vast digital library via e-readers and mobile phones. Since 2010, over 5 million people across 50 countries have read from a digital library of over 40,000 local and international e-books on Worldreader platforms. Worldreader works with device manufacturers, local and international publishers, government agencies, education officials, and local communities to support readers everywhere. With Read to Kids program in India, Worldreader is broadening its reach beyond Africa to India and beyond reading in schools and libraries to reading in homes. This presentation will focus on Worldreader's global contributions to free digital reading and then share recent successes of their innovative Read to Kids in India. This program in South Delhi reaches 200,000 households and drives a fundamental behavior change of reaching parents and caregivers through mobile and supporting them to read to children.

Speakers
avatar for Bhanu Potta

Bhanu Potta

Executive Advisor & India Board Member, Worldreader
As the Global Executive Member and India Board Director at Worldreader, Bhanu provides strategic direction to Worldreader’s global portfolio of digital reading product and leads the buildup of India Organization. Worldreader is a global non-profit on a mission to get digital bo... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
2.03

14:15

Leveraging technology for quality education
Limited Capacity seats available

World Vision India runs this education project with the Lions club of India to help educate 25,000 schoolgoing children from government and aided schools. We focus on the following outcomes as part of our approach –
1. Enhanced engagement experts along with teachers
2. Improved learning experience and outcomes among school children
3. Decreased dropout rates
4. Improved teacher engagement/satisfaction

A major component of this nationwide project is ICT4D. Technology is changing the way life functions. The project provides solutions to provide high quality learning opportunities to marginalized students. Technology has a lot of potential to improve education and when implemented cost-effectively, it can lead to sustainability.

WVI is facilitating digital classes to all children with interactive modules like videos and presentations. These visually attractive methods of teaching have influenced students who were struggling with the traditional method of teaching in a classroom. This kind of visual is both eye-catching and young students can easily relate with them now. It can also help the teachers to improve their work experience in ICT4D while increasing the quality of teaching. Digital class facilities have all these information in memory and presented during the time of class lectures and thus, the time saved is used for assessment and further improving the learning outcomes of children.

As of today the project is benefited to more than 3000 children in 4 cities in India. Plans are in place to cover 10 cities soon.

Speakers
avatar for A.V. George

A.V. George

Project Head - WVI - Lions Education Project, World Vision International
Name : A.V. George | | Age : 48 years | | Designation : Project Head – WVI- Lions Club Education project | | Organization : World Vision India | | Experience : 20 years in the field of education, creating education materials for children at | | school level acros... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
2.05

14:15

You, too, can run a MOOC
Limited Capacity seats available

Are you interested in training large numbers of people in the developing world through a massive open online course (MOOC) approach? And have you been put off by the seemingly complicated and expensive endeavour of MOOC production and delivery? During this presentation, I’ll go over my experience developing and facilitating MOOCs in an international development context, and hopefully this will help you develop or improve your own MOOC strategy. I've uploaded the slides - feel free to take a look!

Speakers
avatar for Ravi Murugesan

Ravi Murugesan

Associate, INASP
Ravi Murugesan wears two hats as a consultant for INASP, an international development charity based in Oxford. He teaches scientific writing to researchers in developing countries, and he develops and facilitates low-bandwidth online courses on Moodle. In the past six years, he h... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
VIP Lounge (2nd floor)

14:15

Fight air inequality through a global, grassroots community and open data
Limited Capacity seats available

Air inequality - the unequal distribution of clean air to breathe across the world - is responsible for one out of every eight deaths globally and one of the most pressing public health issues of our time. OpenAQ (openaq.org), our global and grassroots community of scientists, software developers and lovers of environmental data are sparking an open air quality movement to attack this imminently solvable issue. We have built an open-source platform (github.com/openaq) that provides programmatic, real-time and historical air quality data in a universal format. To date, we have aggregated 30 million air quality datapoints that often would be lost completely or difficult to access from 40 countries around the world. This presentation will share the story of our amazing community who are creating apps, conducting science, writing media articles, and activating their communities to address air inequality. The presentation will also make a call to action for those attending to get involved.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Christa Hasenkopf

Dr. Christa Hasenkopf

Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, OpenAQ
Christa Hasenkopf is an atmospheric scientist, passionate about fighting air inequality across the world. She loves starting up environmental open data projects that give the public data, insights and voices they previously did not have. Hasenkopf is co-founder and CEO of OpenAQ... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.10

14:15

How to develop a global strategy on collaboration
Limited Capacity seats available

The increasing requirements for each NGO project worldwide is to have a swift installed setup, have direct access to experts and knowledge, being agile in terms of scalability.

To meet these performance requirements, the network infrastructure has to be stable, easy to install and manage, offer a high level of security, optimize/prioritize the bandwidth use.

The infrastructure is to meet global sharing of data, web conferencing, video & audio. A global Collaboration strategy.

This have to be reached through minimum of cost and each NGO project have to be sure that the solution is delivered fast and to competitive pricing.

Danoffice would like to present how NGOs can optimize their network infrastructure to meet these requirements via Cisco Spark and how Danoffice can support NGO projects worldwide.

In our presentations we will also highlight:
- How to test global network
- The effect of a global cloud-managed Network.

Danoffice have more than 30 IT LTAs with various UN and NGO´s. In 2016 we delivered to 167 countries.

Speakers
avatar for Claus Nannerup

Claus Nannerup

Business Development Manager, Danoffice IT
Mr. Claus Nannerup, Business Development Manager, is responsible for network and connectivity with Danoffice IT. Mr. Nannerup is working with humanitarian organization such as NGOs and United Nations. Mr. Nannerup has more than ten years of experience within the humanitarian aid... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.08

14:15

Strategies for building and governing national digital health architectures
Limited Capacity seats available

In the developing world, the use of timely, high-quality data is essential to strengthening health systems and providing efficient health services. Vital Wave was engaged in a Data Use Partnership (DUP) to improve information systems and increase the use of data in health care delivery in Ethiopia and Malawi. Vital Wave supported the Ministry of Health in Ethiopia in developing a strategy for their Information Revolution as well as an implementation plan. In Malawi, Vital Wave supported the Ministry of Health by providing a technical review of their HIS improvement and interoperability plan.

Using it's experience in the DUP project, Vital Wave will discuss the foundational elements or activities that are required to help to bring projects to scale. For instance, the firm worked with the Ethiopian government to create a data dictionary and master facility registry - elements that are foundational to building a sustainable digital health architecture.

In addition, the firm will talk about its approach to partnership that was taken with the government and other partners within the overall project. For example, Vital Wave seconded staff to the FMoH to support stakeholders in finalizing the strategy for the digitization of the family folder, testing and optimizing digital solutions, and iteratively design the system with input from user advisory groups. The building of local capacity and encouraging ownership from the government is crucial for scale.

Speakers
avatar for Derek Treatman

Derek Treatman

Director of Technology Solutions, Vital Wave
Mr. Treatman has a background in electrical and computer engineering with unique ability to apply ICT expertise to policy and fieldwork. He has implemented and pioneered variety of mService pilots and ICT4D projects. Most recently, he has worked with the Ministry of Health in Eth... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.09

14:15

Big Data. Big Problems. Big Solutions!
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Non-profit sector, as any other sector, produces a wealth of data that plays a fundamental role in the strategic and operational decision making of the organizations. Nevertheless, many NGOs face a major challenge on storing and integrating the data produced in the field, hence limiting its decision and learning capacity. Data warehousing and integration is an approach that could help fill this gap and Catholic Relief Services is about to embark on this journey. During this workshop the facilitation team will work with participant NGOs to foster collective thinking to help us learn from each other on the topics below:
a) Identifying needs. What are the major challenges and needs in terms of data warehousing, integration and visualization?
b) Sketching the characteristics of a successful data warehousing, integration and visualization solution, within and outside your organization in terms of:
-Best practices and standards
-Technological platform. Most important features.
-Governance. Data access and sharing.
-Privacy and protection.
c) Foundational conditions that enable a successful implementation, and potential risks
d) Opportunities for collaboration and interchange of experiences
The results of the workshop will be shared among the participants.

Speakers
avatar for Naveen Balani

Naveen Balani

IoT & Cognitive Leader, Accenture
I lead the IoT & Cognitive Research for Accenture Labs. More about me @ naveenbalani.com
avatar for Alvaro Cobo-Santillan

Alvaro Cobo-Santillan

Senior Advisor MEAL/ICT, Catholic Relief Services
eValuate Business Lead. Main role consists in ensuring that the agency ICT4D solution (eValuate - http://evaluate.crs.org) is designed for global rollout to meet Monitoring Evaluation Accountability and Learning (MEAL) and Program Management needs in the field, regions and headqu... Read More →
avatar for Caitlin Ferguson

Caitlin Ferguson

Senior Consultant, Vera Solutions
Caitlin is a Senior Consultant with Vera Solutions, based in Mumbai. Through her work at Vera, Caitlin has led the design, implementation, and rollout of cloud- and mobile-based data systems for M&E, volunteer and grant management, and program management for social impact organiz... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Lundberg

Jeff Lundberg

ICT4D Program Manager, Catholic Relief Services
Jeff is a PMP and PMD-Pro certified, IT Program Manager with a Master’s Degree in International Leadership. He is currently leading the ICT4D project portfolio at Catholic Relief Services (CRS). With more than 16 years of collective experience, he has been recognized as a leade... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 15:45
1.01

14:15

The Big Discussions, Health: Women in ICT4D
Limited Capacity seats available

This session will focus on the role of women in ICT – both as creators and users of technology: Why is it important, what do you need to think about, and how do you do it? How can we as leaders in the field foster opportunity for women and girls? What are the most gendered challenges? How can we work to ensure an enabling environment for the next generation of girls? What are some current shining examples?   

Each presenter will share briefly about what their organization is doing to support women in ICT, then we will move to an open and participatory discussion. Please join us!



Speakers
avatar for Heidi Good Boncana

Heidi Good Boncana

Co-Chair/Senior Program Officer, ICT & Innovation, Global Digital Health Network
Ms. Good-Boncana is Senior Program Officer, ICT & Innovation, at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Co-Chair of the Global Digital Health Network - a 2800-person strong CoP focused on connecting technology for health professionals. Ms. Good-Boncana has 13 years o... Read More →
avatar for Debbie Rogers

Debbie Rogers

Managing Director, Praekelt.org
Debbie Rogers is the Managing Directorr for Praekelt Foundation. Prior to this, she was the General Manager  for the organisation, lead the Service Design Team and headed up the Health Portfolio. Her work at Praekelt has exposed her to both the commercial dimension of th... Read More →
avatar for Shruti Shah

Shruti Shah

ICT4D Regional Officer, Asia, Equal Access International
Shruti Shah is ICT4D Regional Officer for Asia at Equal Access International, currently supporting Nepal, Afghanistan & Pakistan programs. Her expertise is applying open source, mobile and emerging technology in development context. With a Master’s degree in Information technol... Read More →
avatar for Ranju Sharma

Ranju Sharma

Regional Designer, Medic Mobile
Ranju has been with Medic Mobile for three years and works out of our Kathmandu office. Before joining us, she helped found the Community Health Program at Possible in Accham, Nepal. She lead a system of community health workers that helped report on and care for the the health o... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Woodman

Lauren Woodman

Chief Executive Officer, NetHope
Lauren Woodman is the Chief Executive Officer of NetHope, where she drives the organization’s aggressive movement to put advanced connective technologies in the hands of nonprofits whose work can be magnified by its power. It is her primary goal to spark the tech world’s inte... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 14:15 - 15:45
Hall 2

14:55

Transition Time
Monday May 15, 2017 14:55 - 15:00
HICC

15:00

E-HINGA: A digital platform for modernization of agri-extension systems
Limited Capacity seats available

e-Hinga is a digital platform for comprehensive access to Agricultural information, which is designed to provide a diversified menu to support smallholder farming households with input access, best practice in crop and livestock production and post-harvest technology, value chain upgrading strategies, as well as sharing of lessons in smallholder commercialization - a social enterprise for revenue diversification through partnerships for e-extension systems business model.

e-Hinga is a dynamic mobile and Web based App that runs both on Android operating system for mobile phones, as well as an online database for web based applications. The portal is also designed to run on offline mode on android phones; to optimize data usage as access to mobile data for smallholder farmers is still limited due to higher prices for internet access. Rwanda has close to 7 Million (over 12 million) mobile phone users, of which 80% are smallholder farmers.

e-Hinga’s features consist of audio applications, texts and pictorial presentations as well as interactive segment through which users can reach out to experts and/or extension agents through tele-conversation or online inquiries. E-Hinga also has an ads section through which the management can commercialize the application for related advertisement and outreach to millions of smallholder farmers with new improved inputs, produces and any other best practices.

e-Hinga is now registered with Rwanda Development board as the intellectual property of World Vision Rwanda. Currently, on its final pilot phase (i.e. ready for scale up), e-Hinga is being used by 9,773 smallholder farmers under the Inzozi Nziza (great dream) project.

World Vision is keen to share evidence from its e-Hinga experience and play a key role in laying the groundwork for potential public-private partnership in order to scale up this proven tool as an evolving agricultural and market information system and commodity exchange platform in East Africa, where there’s promising potential for agribusiness and market information system development for its largely agrarian economy.

Speakers
avatar for Emmanuel Niyongira

Emmanuel Niyongira

Resilience and Livelihood Technical Program Manager, World Vision International
Emmanuel Niyongira is the Resilience & Livelihood Technical Program Manager in World Vision Rwanda. He has over ten years of experience managing livelihood programs in Rwanda. He has attended and presented in different international conferences such as "Cracking the Nut conferenc... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.02

15:00

FarmBeats: AI & IoT for agriculture
Limited Capacity seats available

Food requirements are expected to double by 2050 to meet the demands of the world population, but the amount of land fit for agriculture is shrinking. Data-driven techniques, such as precision agriculture, could help meet the increased demand. In this demo, we will present FarmBeats, an agricultural IoT system that uses a combination of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and wireless sensors to enable data-driven agricultural techniques. In doing so, we develop novel algorithms to maximize the coverage of UAV flights given limited battery power, to combine information from a UAV’s video and ground sensor data, and, finally, to achieve cloud connectivity of the farm’s monitoring system while respecting the harsh bandwidth constraints imposed by the farm’s backhaul link to the Internet.

Speakers
avatar for Ranveer Chandra

Ranveer Chandra

Pricipal Researcher, Microsoft
Ranveer Chandra is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research. He is leading an incubation on IoT Applications, with a focus in Agriculture. He is also leading research projects on white space networking, low-latency wireless, and improving battery life of mobile devices. Ranve... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.04

15:00

ICT in ag: Processes for progress
Limited Capacity seats available

Whether we’re engaging with farmers, partners, colleagues, or beyond to implement an agricultural initiative with an ICT component, one thing remains true: processes - or lack thereof - can make or break a project. Using Oxfam project examples from Cambodia, Bangladesh, and Senegal, we will discuss processes that have proven effective in selecting appropriate technologies; building bridges between private companies, universities, and community-based organizations; and strengthening staff capacity to support ICT in Ag interventions.

Join Oxfam for an interactive session to dig deeper into processes that ensure local ownership and a gender lens in tech usage, and collaborative partnerships for a successful scale-out of a pilot. Attendees will explore what processes matter in their context and participate in hands-on activities with their peers to gain insights that can push their ICT in Ag projects to the next level.

Speakers
avatar for Mansi Anand

Mansi Anand

Program Advisor, R4 Rural Resilience Initiative, Oxfam America
Mansi Anand is Advisor for the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative at Oxfam.  In this role, Mansi supports the overall planning and coordination of R4 program that delivers a comprehensive risk-management package to farmers in Ethiopia and Senegal.  The project improves rural resili... Read More →
avatar for Tapas Chakraborty

Tapas Chakraborty

ICT and Development Coordinator, Oxfam
Working in the development field for the last 18 years. Committed to bring synergy between the development intervention and action research in Bangladesh and closely working with academic and private sector. Currently managing an action research on ICT potential to agriculture fo... Read More →
avatar for Diane Pueschel

Diane Pueschel

Program Advisor, ICT4D & Community Finance, Oxfam
Diane Pueschel joined Oxfam in 2014 with a wealth of international project management experience, specifically in areas of entrepreneurship and information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D). As Program Advisor, Diane provides strategic planning support and gu... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.03

15:00

Social media for agricultural extension and advisory services
Limited Capacity seats available

Since the introduction of social media, communication is becoming more and more dynamic every day. Communication has become more virtual than physical. More and more people – young and old alike – are fascinated by the social media and it is a trend that is not going down very soon. For a long period in the future, social media is going to shape the way people interact, share information, form opinions and also lead individual and collective actions. In a world where social media etiquettes are probably more important than table manners, ignoring it is not something that the development sector can afford to do. Especially for agricultural extension and advisory services (AEAS), whose primary element is communication, social media can be a potential goldmine. Engaging with clients online, helping rural communities gain a voice, making development bottom-up, more fruitful innovation brokering, engaging with all the actors in agricultural innovation systems on the same platform – social media has more than one use for AEAS. But in-spite of all the advantages, its actual use in rural areas of developing countries is still low due to infrastructural difficulties and psychological barriers. Also, skill and competence in using social media is also lacking. Though national and international organizations are opening up to the prospects of social media, at local level this digital media still faces skepticism. Training programs, awareness campaigns, and workshops can help actors in agricultural extension understand and use social media better. Extension is not just about communicating but bringing behavioural change and social media can prove to be a powerful aide if utilized up to its potential. GFRAS Global survey on use of social media in agricultural extension and advisory services conducted online across 60 countries provided interesting results on role of social media in Agricultural Innovation Systems (AIS), and agro-advisory services. To quote one respondent, “SM is not only a tool for reaching large audiences; it is also an opportunity to develop relationships.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Saravanan Raj

Dr. Saravanan Raj

Director (Agricultural Extension) & Director (Centre for Agripreneurship Development)), National Institute of Agricultural Extension Management (MANAGE)
Dr. Saravanan Raj, Director (Agricultural Extension) in the National Institute of Agricultural Extension Management (MANAGE), Hyderabad, India (an apex level organisation of the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, Government of India) and Lead, Global Forum for Rural Ad... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.01

15:00

Speed Networking

A fun and fast networking opportunity facilitating introductions and conversation.

You will make many new contacts in a short time to help build and maintain long-term relationships.

There will be several short rounds to meet other participants; latecomers are welcome!

Don’t forget your business cards!


Speakers
avatar for Sonja Ruetzel

Sonja Ruetzel

ICT4D Conference Manager, Catholic Relief Services


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
Hall 1

15:00

iDeliver: Developing a digital tool for intrapartum care
Limited Capacity seats available

PLEASE NOTE: THIS PRESENTATION HAS CHANGED. 

Vecna Cares is a not for profit organization based between Cambridge, Massachusetts and Nairobi, Kenya. Join us at this talk to hear about our work with Project iDeliver, funded by Merck for Mothers.iDeliver is be a mobile, digital, point-of-care tool for providers that first and foremost makes quality measurement and monitoring routine, thereby providing the necessary data to drive towards quality of care improvement during the intrapartum period.

iDeliver was built on top of the current Vecna Cares EMR, and has recently been deployed to a pilot cohort of clinics in the Transmara District of Kenya, where Vecna Cares has been working for five years. Vecna Cares, with the support of the DHMT in Transmara, has deployed its solar powered server and power management system, the CliniPAK, to 45 clinics in the region. iDeliver is being hosted on a subset of these CliniPAKs. 

In this talk, we will discuss the project design, build and pilot portions, and present next steps for scale. 

Speakers
avatar for Gillian Javetski

Gillian Javetski

Director of Partnerships, Vecna Cares Charitable Trust
Gillian is the Director of Partnerships at Vecna Cares, a technology organization that designs and deploys hardware, software, and implementation solutions to create measurable impact. Gillian has built her career working for organizations that build impactful technology for low... Read More →
avatar for Emily Taylor

Emily Taylor

Director of Communications, Vecna Cares
I wear many hats at Vecna Cares, a non profit company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. We design and deploy information management and technology solutions to create measureable impact, helping people in low resource settings live healthier and better lives. We build systems t... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.05

15:00

Open source software for supply chain & logistics in rural emerging markets
Limited Capacity seats available

Last-mile logistics systems need quality demand and inventory data shared through reliable coordination mechanisms to prevent unnecessary cost and waste. But with medicines and other essential commodities, the ideal condition — real time actionable data — is difficult to come by. Ground realities contribute to this. Poor road infrastructure and the absence of computerized systems result in major information delays, and people generally operate without deep visibility into what else is happening along the supply channel. These obstacles magnify uncertainty, manifesting what operations researchers call the “bullwhip effect”.

Although techniques to mitigate these effects have long existed where computing infrastructure and data capture were well established, only in recent years, afforded by the rapid adoption of smartphones in low-resource environments, are these efficiencies are available to a broader section of humanity. As such, the possibilities are greatly enhanced for more equitable access to public good commodities in the rural, developing world.

In this presentation the speaker will demonstrate the open source Logistimo platform and its features that enable dynamic coordination between various echelons of public supply chains. More promisingly, its open, collaborative framework will allow for more inclusive, community-directed solutions. From inventory and order management, optimization and forecasting, GIS enabled services, performance dashboards rich with data visualization and analytics, to transport routing, scheduling and monitoring; it is intended that the audience get a comprehensive view of the user-centric system and gain perspective on the opportunity it presents to the ICT community for wider participation toward the goals of equitable social development.

Speakers
avatar for CHARAN MALEMARPURAM

CHARAN MALEMARPURAM

Director-Engineering, Logistimo Pvt. Ltd
Charan is passionate about applying technologies to solve last mile problems. As Director of engineering, he oversees some of Logistimo's most distinctive work, including its flagship supply chain platform that enables nations and corporations across the globe to provide essentia... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.02

15:00

Social registries & single registries: Clarifying terminological confusion
Limited Capacity seats available

Across developing countries, there is a growing recognition that building linkages between the Management Information Systems (MISs) of individual social protection programmes can bring about significant efficiency gains while also enabling governments to monitor national social protection systems more effectively. Information collected on applicants and beneficiaries that is shared between programmes and governments can build a comprehensive picture of the national profile of beneficiaries (and those denied access) as well as the performance of schemes and the national social protection system.

This presentation presents a potential model for integrated information management for a national social protection system and details the challenges and opportunities for developing countries when managing information of their citizens (beneficiaries). In doing so however, we must address the growing terminological confusion and, in particular, significant misunderstandings about two very different types of registries that countries may choose to pursue within social protection: Single Registries and what are increasingly becoming known as Social Registries.

Speakers
avatar for Shez Farooq

Shez Farooq

Senior MIS Specialist / Senior IT and Operations Consultant, Development Pathways
Shez Farooq is a Senior MIS Specialist at Development Pathways with over 17 years of experience. Shez advises on MIS design and development for social protection schemes and is currently supporting developing countries to integrate data and information management across their soc... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.06

15:00

Cash based interventions with Redrose
Limited Capacity seats available

With over 30 years experience working in the humanitarian and card payment sectors, the RedRose team has designed and developed a unique, web based system, tailored solely to meet the needs of the Humanitarian Sector. The ONEsystem enables NGO’s to register beneficiaries, rapidly mobilise Cash and DIK Programmes and provides real time monitoring and evaluation reporting.Our approach was to create an easy to use solution that caters for CBI interventions, whatever the context (offline and online); and to develop and fully integrate all the tools necessary to deliver effective CBI programs on one platform. Given the dynamic nature of Humanitarian programs, our product enables NGOs complete flexibility; managers can now choose the most relevant CBI modality given the context. As programs evolve and context changes, the ONEsolution allows managers to add new programs of the same or different modalities. The RedRose ONEsolution is offered as Software as a Service (SaaS) model, and is designed for both open and closed loop systems, which are available on a secure cloud based platform.

The key features of the RedRose ONEsolution includes all the following
• Source of funds including; donor grants, budgets and CBI activities
• Beneficiary registration and management [including biometrics]
• Program management for all CBI modalities used in Markets including:
o E-Cash: Mobile money, Pre-paid cards [ATM’s/POS], bank transfers
o E-vouchers: smart cards or mobile phones
o Paper vouchers [using QR codes and Barcodes]
o In-kind goods and services
o Cash for work and on-site verification [incl. training or attendance tracking]
• Vendor interface and management, financial reconciliations with full audit trial of all transactions
• Real time Monitoring & Evaluation including; surveys, complaints, PDM’s and customised dashboards for internal and external reporting, all reports are exportable to excel.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Healy

Brian Healy

Business Development, RedRose
RedRose is a technology company established to enable NGOs to revolutionise the way they deliver Cash Based Interventions (CBI’s) globally. RedRose has developed the RedRose ONEsolution to help NGOs improve operational efficiency and ensure programs remain relevant and fit for... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.04

15:00

Technology solutions for the field
Limited Capacity seats available

Alternative delivery channels- What organisations must consider while choosing technology solutions for their organisations, especially for the filed and client interface.

Speakers
avatar for Gaurav Singh

Gaurav Singh

Country Manager, Software Group BG
10 Years of Work experience in Consulting and Financial Inclusion. Helped build Grameen Foundation's work in India and headed 3 Business Verticals of HR Consulting, Data Driven Management, and Bankers without Borders. Conceived, planned and pitched ideas around digital financial... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.03

15:00

Empowering drought-affected families via e-vouchers in Mozambique
Limited Capacity seats available

Across the Southern Africa region, the effects of an El Niño-induced drought have ravaged crops and cattle, limiting food supplies and pushing millions further into hunger and malnutrition. Families have been forced to adopt negative coping strategies, such as school dropout and child labour.

Mozambique has an estimated 2.3 million in need of food assistance , with budgets struggling to keep pace . As such, the need for efficient, effective and accountable programmes are vital. In the provinces of Tete, Sofala and Gaza, the Consorcio Humanitario de Mocambique, consisting of World Vision, Master Card, Food for the Hungry and the Government, is leveraging e-vouchers to deliver life-saving support to the most vulnerable children, families and communities until March, 2017 . With funding from DFID, the project is targeting 13,007 drought-affected families with food security and resilience efforts.

The e-voucher programme, which has leveraged World Vision’s Last Mile Mobile Solutions and MCAid , has realised the following benefits:

1. Enriched beneficiary dignity and agency to purchase desired commodities
2. Boosted local economy where registered traders are guaranteed income
3. Expanded financial inclusion & literacy for beneficiaries engaging financial institutions
4. Enhanced logistical efficiencies in the distribution and redemption of e-vouchers
5. Improved real-time M&E to discern beneficiary needs, market trends and diet diversity
6. Strengthened private-sector partnerships with financial institutions and local traders

World Vision’s presentation will showcase better humanitarian practices in e-voucher programming, technology and private-sector partnerships, in order to encourage more efficient and effective responses to food security crises.

Speakers
avatar for Keith Chibafa

Keith Chibafa

Head of Business Development (LMMS), World Vision International
Keith Chibafa joined WV International in 2010 after a career in the private sector. He is responsible for overseeing World Vision International’s (WVI) efforts to collaborate with key local and international entities interested in the implementation and execution of WVI’s Las... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
2.01

15:00

Transforming lives through technology in humanitarian aid & disaster relief
Limited Capacity seats available

All stakeholders in The Humanitarian Aid & Disaster Relief Disbursement value chain are continually challenged with bringing about Transparency & Accountability in the benefits disbursement process.

I will be talking about how leveraging technology can transform lives while bringing about Transparency and Accountability in various forms of aid and relief disbursement, spanning from disbursement of food, cash, non-food-items to cash transfers to communities that are adversely affected by war, natural disasters and other calamities

Speakers
avatar for Sailesh Savani

Sailesh Savani

FOUNDER & CEO, COMPULYNX LTD
I am passionate about transforming lives of people who have been displaced or whose lives have been disrupted for no fault of their own. | | I am a B.Com from Bombay Uni, a Dip Comp Sc. Bombay & Entrepreneur’s Master Program at MIT Boston. I've been in Tech industry for... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
2.02

15:00

Unified ICT solution for CRS’ resettlement project in the Philippines
Limited Capacity seats available

The Anibong community is an informal settlement of 2,600 families, located in a coastal area of northern Tacloban (The Philippines). The community was one of the hardest-hit by Super Typhoon Haiyan (November 8, 2013). Anibong residents have limited access to basic services and income-generating opportunities, and are highly exposed to hazards (both natural and man-made). CRS’ Anibong Resettlement Project (ARP) seeks to reverse the community’s situation, to support the most vulnerable households from Anibong to relocate to a safer area, with full access to basic services and livelihoods opportunities. The ARP has placed community participation at the foundation of the project, and is continuously providing Anibong residents opportunities to find their voices and learn how to make informed decisions.

In this session, the presenter will share the experience of implementing ICT4D in the project. These includes mobile data collection, development of custom database system, reporting, web hosting, data backup and security. This session will also include the use of Polinode, a tool that can analyze and visualize network data. It was used to build a graphic network that shows the preferences of family in terms of neighbors likelihood, that will be used by the Urban Planners to locate each family in the resettlement site.


Speakers
avatar for Radin Rubis

Radin Rubis

ICT4D Coordinator, Catholic Relief Services
Radin is the ICT4D Coordinator at Catholic Relief Services in the Philippines and based in Tacloban City. He is responsible of proposing, developing and implementing ICT4D solutions for monitoring and evaluation of Typhoon Haiyan Recovery Program. He is very passionate in develop... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.06

15:00

Bridging digital divides: Community partnerships & near to peer learning
Limited Capacity seats available

For ICT tools to be most effective in promoting sustainable development, it is important for disadvantaged communities themselves to have the capacities to develop and modify ICT tools, and for the tool development process to be integrated into broader processes of community building and social change. One of the greatest challenges in achieving this is not just having access to technology, but in overcoming the subtle barriers that poor communities face in learning how to use and control digital technologies. These barriers are often underestimated. Even in OECD countries, a recent study found, on average 25% of adults has no or only limited experience with computers, and only 30% were proficient at problem solving in technology rich environments. Since 1998, the Everett Program for Technology and Social Change at the University of California Santa Cruz has addressed this challenge through creating a model of peer-to-peer and near-to-peer learning built on University-Community partnerships focused on social justice and environmental sustainability goals. The Everett Program uses social enterprise principles to train undergraduate students to create innovative projects in partnership with NGOs and community organizations locally and internationally. The majority of these students come from disadvantaged backgrounds themselves with little or no exposure to digital tool development. The program is rooted in peer learning processes, developed by students themselves and that require students to collaboratively learn from and with each other. These peer-to-peer learning processes are then integrated into project planning, development and implementation processes with community partners. Community partners have found this approach of young people leading peer-learning processes to be effective in demystifying technology and overcoming subtle barriers that interfere with the learning process. This presentation will share lessons learned from our work and promote discussion about effective ways of building ICT proficiency. https://youtu.be/Ic_SADEdcHs

Speakers
avatar for Chris Benner

Chris Benner

Professor and Director, Everett Program for Technology and Social Change, University of California Santa Cruz
Dr. Chris Benner is the Dorothy E. Everett Chair in Global Information and Social Entrepreneurship, Director of the Everett Program for Technology and Social Change, and a Professor of Environmental Studies and Sociology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research e... Read More →
avatar for Yesenia Torres

Yesenia Torres

Executive Fellow, Everett Program
I believe in the intersection of social justice and information technology. My passion lies in blending the two in order to create comprehensive solutions for global problems like access to education. I'm currently building my technical skills in software engineering, programming... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
2.03

15:00

Bridging the distance: Mobile mentorship for vulnerable girls in India
Limited Capacity seats available

Mentoring works. But it’s time-consuming, expensive and difficult to scale. In an attempt to replicate an evidence-based analogue mentoring programme, Girl Effect, Praekelt.org and Mentor Together collaborated to create a new mobile mentoring programme—Mentor To Go— that attempts to overcome the distance, both literal and metaphorical, between vulnerable young girls and female mentors.

Building on Mentor Together’s tried-and-tested curriculum and offline mentorship programme, Mentor to Go leverages mobile technologies to reach girls in under-resourced environments in India. Girls are often denied access to mentorship for many reasons, including a shortage of female mentors, limits on their mobility, and programmes not catered to their needs. Mentor To Go overcomes these and other obstacles by providing girls and female mentors with a way to connect via mobile.

Female mentors, recruited via social media, undergo digital training and vetting before downloading an android app that provides them with the curriculum, guidance and a way of calling their mentees — for free. Once girls have been matched with a mentor, using a sophisticated algorithm, they use simple handsets to speak with their mentors and to engage with an interactive voice response (IVR) service that monitors their progress. Strict data safety and security protocols ensure that girls are protected and that the relationships are monitored closely.

Through this innovative solution, Mentor To Go improves the confidence of girls while providing them with life-skills they can use to fulfill their potential. With results from the pilot proving promising, the mobile platform is set to expand.

This case study will demonstrate how human-centered design was used to develop a technological equivalent of an existing offline programme and show how the Principles for Digital Development helped guide its creation. The presentation will also examine some of the early results from the pilot programme to suggest how technology can play a role in improving gender equity.

Speakers
avatar for Namrata Baruah

Namrata Baruah

COO, Mentor Together
Namrata works at Mentor Together as its Chief Operating Officer. In her role, she oversees overall operations and has also led the creation of Mentor Together’s Work-Skills Mentoring Programme. In addition, Namrata contributes to the development of innovative programmes like t... Read More →
avatar for Indrani Vedula

Indrani Vedula

Program Manager, Praekelt.org
As the Program Manager for Praekelt.org in India for the past 4 and a half years, Indrani leads the Program production management for the Girl Effect Mobile (GEM) Initiative. The GEM portfolio of projects has implementations in India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Rwanda, Ethiopia and S... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
2.05

15:00

Building a culture of reading via crowdsourced and mobile delivered stories
Limited Capacity seats available

In Zambia, where reading materials in the local language are scarce, a model is being tested by Creative Associates International to use SMS, IVR and radio to collect folktales and stories from the community and regularly distribute selected edited stories via similar technology means to parents of early grade children to cost effectively make relevant and fresh local language reading materials available in homes. Makhalidwe Athu, meaning “The way we live” in Chinyanja, is a winner of the All Children Reading Innovation grant and other distinctions. This presentation will present the model and findings of an RCT that will conclude in early 2017, and engage in discussion with audience about applicability in other contexts and fields.

Speakers
avatar for Ayan Kishore

Ayan Kishore

Director, Technology for Development, Creative Associates International
Ayan Kishore is a social entrepreneur who has successfully built, grown and sold technology companies. At Creative Associates International, he leads the Creative Development Lab in the application of technology in development programs in education, violence prevention, workforce... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
2.04

15:00

Digital services changing lives
Limited Capacity seats available

When thinking of ICT4D, true success of an organization is determined not by the revenue it generates nor by how efficiently it delivers the services required, but by how it can effect a positive social and economic change with the services provided while aligning with its own business goals.

This session would talk about a few focused examples of partners we work with where we have successfully been able to make a large scale impact.

We collaborated with the world’s largest fundraising platform to streamline payments for genuine global campaigns by filtering the correct campaigns, formatting them correctly, moderating images and content which helps build trust and safety for the same. With our services, clients can now channel millions of donors with billions accumulated in funds to the rightful and most deserving campaigns.

We also helped the medical world look at cancer in a different way. Our cancer cell classification services have enabled the creation of a curated dataset so precise that our client is currently in the process of feeding them to their algorithms effecting significant reduction in time to automatically diagnose the type of cancer in a patient’s body thereby increasing the chances of an early detection and treatment.

This work is being done through disruptive skilling of young under-privileged people from various parts of the country. 82% of our workforce belong to the marginalized portion of society with 59% being women employees.

Ours is a story of cultivation and motivation and this session is designed to share.

Speakers
avatar for Arnab Chowdhury

Arnab Chowdhury

Manager - Key Accounts, iMerit Technology Services Private Limited
Arnab brings 11 years of global experience in varied management roles across industries spanning IT services, Loyalty Marketing, Advertising and Events. | | At iMerit, Arnab is mainly responsible for relationship management for key accounts across varied verticals. With a flai... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
VIP Lounge (2nd floor)

15:00

Analytics for connecting the unconnected
Limited Capacity seats available

In collaboration with other members of Telcom Infra Program's initiative to extend connectivity to currently unserviced rural populations internationally, Vanu is developing novel techniques to enable the effective design and implementation of its small cell mobile networks. In this presentation we discuss recent innovations toward population and coverage modeling using both machine learning and drone application development.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Justin Greenough

Dr. Justin Greenough

Data Scientist, Vanu
Previously research mathematician, now data scientist with an interest in developing analytical architecture to address global sustainability goals.



Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.08

15:00

ICTs for M&E and RCTs - Tech for impact evaluation in the African Sahel
Limited Capacity filling up

Equal Access International’s media high-quality, local language, media programming has played a significant role in educating and engaging communities for the past 8 years in the Sahel region of Africa. A third of radio listeners in this zone threatened by violent extremism tune in to our weekly radio programs on good governance, peacebuilding, and tolerance, and thousands of journalists and hundreds of media houses have benefited from our institution-strengthening trainings and support. But does listenership translate to real progress towards our target SDG#16: Peace, Justice, and Strong institutions? And how can we get accurate evaluations of impact when faced with the challenges of limited financial resources and the safety concerns raised by in-person surveying in insecure areas?

In this presentation, Ms. Chapman will discuss EA’s design for a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) using Interactive Voice Response (IVR), in four countries in Sub-Saharan Africa to assess the effects of community radio under the USAID-funded Voices for Peace project. From using tablet-equipped youth researchers and cloud-based survey management to put a spin on the traditional household survey, to piloting IVR to track activities and solicit feedback, EA has been exploring ways to harness the power, convenience, and low cost of ICT solutions to determine the answers to these questions. By deploying IVR surveys distributed to program participants, to ‘opt-in’ members of the public (e.g. polling past radio listener callers on attitudes and opinions), or even to a random sample of respondents (e.g. to test for listenership rates), EA is able to collect data remotely, frequently, and in real-time. We use periodic in-person monitoring visits and ICT-enabled surveys to triangulate IVR-collected data. EA Program Manager Rebecca Chapman will review challenges and strategies for these approaches, including using metadata to ensure survey data is accurate, high-quality, and in line with randomization protocols, and addressing the tech learning curve with program staff and participants.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Chapman

Rebecca Chapman

Program Manager, Equal Access International
Rebecca Chapman is a Program Manager for Equal Access International (EA), an INGO dedicated to combining traditional and new media tools with direct community engagement to create positive social change for millions of underserved people across the developing world. Rebecca is pa... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.07

15:00

Mobile tools to increase government accountability & citizen participation
Limited Capacity seats available

In 2016, Jhatkaa.org ran a campaign in Bangalore to stop burning of garbage. We built a simple tool whereby users could take a photo whenever they saw burning garbage on the streets, and WhatsApp it to a number. The images were then plotted on a map online and could be viewed as a layer on a user's mobile Google Maps as well.

With this evidence we got the Joint Commissioner (Solid Waste Management) of the BBMP (Bangalore's Municipal Authority), to issue a notification detailing fines for burning of garbage.

We then continued to engage citizens to keep up reporting, providing them with a tool to find their local BBMP officer's details. Proactive citizens started to use the tool to reach out their local level officials and engage them. We have started seeing initial reports of reduction in garbage burning, and clean-up in some areas of the city.

In 2017 we plan to disseminate these tools more widely and get people more involved in using ICTs to hold municipal authorities accountable. We also plan to work on other aspects of clean air like vehicular pollution, energy sources etc.

Over 2017 we also plan to partner with other organisations, and train them with the tools and technology to run clean air campaigns across India.

You can read more about Jhatkaa.org here https://jhatkaa.org/about-jhatkaa/

Speakers
avatar for Avijit Michael

Avijit Michael

Executive Director, Jhatkaa.org
Avijit Michael has worked at the intersection of campaigning and digital technology for the past decade. He led the team that pioneered online petitions and digital mobilisation in India with Greenpeace. He then worked at Change.org as Country Director to setup their India operat... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.10

15:00

Strategies for building and governing national digital health architectures
Limited Capacity seats available

In the developing world, the use of timely, high-quality data is essential to strengthening health systems and providing efficient health services. Vital Wave was engaged in a Data Use Partnership (DUP) to improve information systems and increase the use of data in health care delivery in Ethiopia and Malawi. Vital Wave supported the Ministry of Health in Ethiopia in developing a strategy for their Information Revolution as well as an implementation plan. In Malawi, Vital Wave supported the Ministry of Health by providing a technical review of their HIS improvement and interoperability plan.

Using it's experience in the DUP project, Vital Wave will discuss the foundational elements or activities that are required to help to bring projects to scale. For instance, the firm worked with the Ethiopian government to create a data dictionary and master facility registry - elements that are foundational to building a sustainable digital health architecture.

In addition, the firm will talk about its approach to partnership that was taken with the government and other partners within the overall project. For example, Vital Wave seconded staff to the FMoH to support stakeholders in finalizing the strategy for the digitization of the family folder, testing and optimizing digital solutions, and iteratively design the system with input from user advisory groups. The building of local capacity and encouraging ownership from the government is crucial for scale.

Speakers
avatar for Derek Treatman

Derek Treatman

Director of Technology Solutions, Vital Wave
Mr. Treatman has a background in electrical and computer engineering with unique ability to apply ICT expertise to policy and fieldwork. He has implemented and pioneered variety of mService pilots and ICT4D projects. Most recently, he has worked with the Ministry of Health in Eth... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.09

15:45

Coffee & Tea Break
Monday May 15, 2017 15:45 - 16:15
Hall 4

16:15

Dimagi's implementation of mobile tech for agriculture at scale
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

This presentation will focus on discussing several of Dimagi's implementations of CommCare as it relates to the agricultural sector. Although principally a health focused implementation and services technology firm - Dimagi is fast becoming one of the largest agricultural technology companies in the world. Dimagi currently has 100 agriculture projects in 35 countries, collecting over 2 million forms from 1 million cases.

CommCare is being deployed to support four key and complimentary sectors: agricultural extension, agricultural cooperatives, agricultural logistics, and agricultural finance. Dimagi supports a variety of scale, from national deployments for school feeding programs in Zambia with the World Food Program, to organizations that independently develop and deploy their own technology, such as seed package tracking and sales with partners in Mali.

A brief overview will be given of the technology, including its features such as offline capabilities and GPS area mapping, as well as implications for programs with our new reporting and analytics capabilities.

Finally, the talk will highlight Dimagi's work with select projects, including: Care PATHWAYS to empowerment (ag extension), private cooperative management in Senegal, cashew distribution with the MoA of Mozambique and TNS (ag logistics) and how we're planning to expand our work to include asset evaluations for the ag sector.

Speakers
avatar for Anthony Connor

Anthony Connor

Partnerships Director, Dimagi
Anthony Connor is the partnerships and development manager for Dimagi, based out of Washington DC. Prior to working on general partnerships, Anthony was the agricultural lead for Dimagi and prior to that, the founder and CEO of the AGROAM market information system.



Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.02

16:15

Harnessing ICT for plant disease diagnosis and health protection in Africa
Limited Capacity seats available

Timely communication and provision of right information are among the critical needs for deployment of appropriate plant health management solutions to protect crop yields and farmer access to markets in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Despite dramatic increase in use of internet, smartphones and other ICT technologies, substantial digital divide exists between service providers and seekers. Moreover, several ICT-based farm tools are not readily applicable for agricultural systems in SSA. At the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), R4D efforts are focused on development of fit-for-purpose ICTs for agricultural development in SSA. This presentation provides details of ICTs for disease diagnosis and decision making. Drawing from extensive experience of farming systems in SSA, a multidisciplinary approach has been employed to develop two Web app’s: (i) for the surveillance (crop disease surveillanceTM) of emerging and invasive diseases to improve capability to quickly identify and effectively respond to emerging diseases; and (ii) seed quality management (SeedtrackerTM) along the value chain to enhance the production and trading of quality seed. These interactive custom made apps connect farmers, seed producers, regulators, extension services, input suppliers, traders and researchers, and dramatically improves lab to landscape connectivity for timely delivery of services to the end-users and document baseline of trends of disease emergence and seed production and trade. Details of these apps, their uses, scaling-up and its implications will be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Lava Kumar

Lava Kumar

Head, Germplasm Health/Virology & Diagnostics, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)
Lava Kumar is the Head of the Germplasm Health/Virologist at IITA, Ibadan, Nigeria. His multidisciplinary R4D programs are focused on finding solutions to control plant virus diseases affecting food staples, including development of ICT tools for disease diagnosis, surveillance a... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.04

16:15

Using recent advances in ICT for better nutrient & crop management in rice
Limited Capacity seats available

In general, across India, fertilizer recommendations are generally made as blanket recommendations and do not reflect differences in indigenous soil fertility, prevailing crop management practices, yield responses, or attainable yield potential across sites or years. Site Specific nutrient management (SSNM) was a general concept for optimizing the supply and demand of nutrients according to their variation in time and space. However, for scaling SSNM approach, new ways need to be identified and developed. IRRI in partnership with other national and international organizations has developed a web- and mobile phone based application/software’ ‘Crop Manager for Rice-based Systems, (CMRS) uses recent advances in ICT and aims to increase farmer's net income and sustain the productivity for rice-based cropping systems. CMRS provides irrigated and rainfed farmers with rice-based cropping systems with a crop and nutrient management guideline customized to the needs of an individual farmer. With mobile phone and internet penetrating fast in rural India – India has 110 million mobile internet users of which 25 million are in rural India – these ICT-based tools, especially in the future, will serve as a useful platform to take knowledge to the farmers easily and when they need it. Aiming to increase a farmer’s income by US$100 per hectare per crop, the Rice Crop Manager was released in Bangladesh in 2015 and in Bihar and Odisha, India in 2016. These ICT tools are based on strong scientific principles and show an edge over the traditional soil testing facilities, which usually take more time to give recommendations and require farmers to carry soil samples to a testing facility. With the help of technologies like Crop Manager, it is expected that farmers in South Asia will be able to replicate high-tech precision farming used in developed countries with easy-to-use and low-cost options.

Speakers
avatar for Sheetal Sharma

Sheetal Sharma

Scientist -Soil Science/ Nutrient Management Specialist, International Rice Research Institute
Sheetal Sharma leads IRRI’s research in design, evaluation, and dissemination of soil and nutrient management technologies for the rice-based systems of South Asia. She is currently involved in the conceptualization, development, verification, release, and promotion of mobile... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.03

16:15

Application of ICT4D for SMILE Project mid-term review using the SenseMaker
Limited Capacity seats available

SenseMaker® is a research evaluation method that is specifically designed to monitor and explore complex processes from multiple human perspectives. SenseMaker(SM)® consists of several micro-narratives, questions, a pattern detection software and an underlying methodology that adheres to the basic principles of working in a complex space.

It consists of collecting micro-narrative which are interpreted by the respondent through a series of questions referred as signifiers. There are 3 important types of signifiers known as triads, stones and dyads. The data collection instrument is called the signification framework (SF). The SM® also includes a “pattern detection software” called Explorer that is used for analysis.

The USAID-funded Sustainable Mechanism for Improving Livelihood and Household Empowerment (SMILE) implemented by CRS utilized SM® approach to complement other methods of data collections in two out of the 5 implementation states during the projects mid-term review (MTR).

Micro-narratives in English and two local languages were obtained from 490 caregiver beneficiaries.

The SenseMaker® SF was uploaded in 9 mini iPads and each was assigned to an enumerator. It took approximately 45-90 minutes to interview a caregiver including listening to their stories, which are captured through the audio recording facility of the tool. The caregivers were able to tell their stories, which are captured verbatim by the device and stored, followed by questions relating to their stories or experience. The follow up questions are represented using triads, stones and dyads, which the caregivers make marks on the iPads to represent a measure of their comparative benefits or perception of SMILE intervention or other natural occurrences in their lives that have affected them positively or negatively in the past, among options depicted on the objects.

The use of SM® for the SMILE MTR is yet another example where technology provided an opportunity to analyze explanatory narratives in which cognitive bias is minimized thereby enhancing the reliance on the conclusions.

Speakers
avatar for Stanley Amadiegwu

Stanley Amadiegwu

MEAL Director, CRS SMILE Project, Catholic Relief Services
Mr. Stanley Amadiegwu is the MEAL Director for the USG-funded ‘Sustainable Mechanism for Improving Livelihood and Household Empowerment’ (USAID-SMILE). He has over 15 years’ experience working on MEAL of public health programs, and the last 7 years were specifically in OVC... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.01

16:15

Future of digital birth registration: Making every child count
Limited Capacity seats available

The births of more than 1 in 4 children under the age of 5 worldwide have not been recorded, which often carries a negative impact on their lives and realization of their rights well into adulthood. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) has the potential to provide transformative improvements in civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) systems based on its ability to extend registration coverage, standardise and streamline civil registration and vital statistics processes, integrate data from multiple systems and securely store data at scale, all in a cost-effective way. Plan International is leading a project that plans to implement Digital Birth Registrations within Africa and Asia.

Plan International is a core group member of the African Programme for the Accelerated Improvement of Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (APAI-CRVS).

Within the framework of the 5 year (2016-2020) strategy and work programme of the APAI-CRVS, Plan International proposes to lead an initiative to develop a standards based open-source CRVS software platform, OpenCRVS.

Make OpenCRVS available as open-source software to provide countries with a freely available option for CRVS digitisation that is aligned with UN standards3, international best-practice and a rights-based approach.

Provide OpenCRVS documentation that allows countries to quickly and efficiently install, configure and rollout the software to support CRVS in a particular country context

Create training materials so that end-users and system administrators are able to maximize their effectiveness using OpenCRVS

This presentation will go over Plan’s long history as a leading expert on birth registration and present the current project plan for the OpenCRVS software platform. We hope to engage with the audience, share lessons and experiences and share valuable experience with conference participants about the future of digital CRVS.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Barrette

Jessica Barrette

Business Analyst, Plan International Australia
Hi There! | | Jess Barrette is a Business Analyst/Project Manager with 12 years broad range experience consulting in global, national and local large scale Lean and Agile technology projects within the banking, technology, energy, insurance and government sectors. | | J... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.05

16:15

ICT4D data protection & privacy
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

This presentation discusses the case study conducted for an ICT4D projects on how data protection and privacy are considered throughout the project planning and implementation.

The presentation will discuss lessons learned, high level outcomes as well as the following:
- What solution was designed and whether data protection was taken into account.
- Recommendations to improve data management to protect beneficiary privacy.
- Recommendations of good practices to ensure all ICT4D Project Services engagements adequately address data protection.

Speakers
avatar for Angella L McKay

Angella L McKay

Information Security Officer, Catholic Relief Services
I am currently the Information Security Officer for Catholic Relief Services. I am responsible for Identifying and address exposures to accidental or intentional destruction, disclosure, modification, or interruption of information that may cause serious financial and/or informat... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.06

16:15

Case of use of alternative data by lenders
Limited Capacity seats available

Use of alternative. A case for use of data generated by farmer management systems to make credit decisions by lenders.

Speakers
avatar for Reuben Gicheha

Reuben Gicheha

Program Officer,Financial Inclusion, AGRA
Reuben has over 10 years experience in the financial inclusion space in Kenya having with the two leading banks in Kenya.He pioneered the KCB Mpesa micro lending business before moving to AGRA in the MasterCard Foundation funded financial inclusion program.He is the lead for Keny... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.03

16:15

Microfinance transformation through ICT Innovation
Limited Capacity seats available

Global Communities is an innovator in providing locally appropriate financial solutions. We pioneered housing microfinance in the 1980s and have managed lending institutions in the world’s most challenging environments since the 1990s. Every institution that we manage was established to meet the needs of the local communities in which we work. As a result, we operate a highly-localized and internationally proven business model, and offer a broad spectrum of products that help families, first time entrepreneurs, and well-established small businesses chart their own path.

This approach has resulted in healthy, growing portfolios across 8 countries that today surpass a combined $216 million in loans outstanding. From 2004 to 2015, Global Communities disbursed nearly 700,000 loans to low- and moderate-income customers, totaling more than $1.76 billion, while maintaining an average repayment rate of 98 %.

Building on this unique approach and Global Communities collective knowledge and experience in micro-credit, we have developed Web-Abacus™. Web-Abacus™ is a complete web based loan portfolio management system. It supports flexible product definition, multiple sources of funds, any number of branches and multiple users with different levels of access and security.

Web-Abacus™ manages clients and loans by mirroring the specific processes used in each institution, providing a customized system that meets the institution’s needs. Web-Abacus™ also incorporates multi-level loan approval processes and provides a comprehensive set of reports.

The presentation/demo will highlight Global Communities' approach to innovation and the evolution of it's most successful and sustainable ICT4D solution, Web-Abacus™.

Speakers
avatar for Billy Blake

Billy Blake

CIO, Global Communities
Billy Blake is CIO at Global Communities. Billy champions the use of information and communications technologies (ICT) as a strategic enabler for Global Communities operations world-wide, leading efforts to make use of technology in new and innovative ways that enhance the organi... Read More →
BM

Boris Marković

Boris Marković is leading the Web-Abacus software solution team of Global Communities, which for over ten years helps making credit inclusion possible to impoverished and rejected people in war thorn ME regions and Europe. His team substantially contribute to proactive and respo... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.02

16:15

From spreadsheets to CRM platforms: Introduction of business approaches
Limited Capacity seats available

The war in Syria, currently in its 7th year, and its spill-over effects in the neighboring countries can be considered one of the worst and most exhausting crises of our time. Complex emergencies, that become protracted in nature, require complex solutions and responses. This naturally includes innovation and a constant drive to deliver assistance more efficiently and effectively as the limited resources often cannot cover the needs on the ground. Setting its mind on bringing ICT4D solutions to practice in this setting and following the ideas and vision of the Grand Bargain, Caritas Jordan and Caritas Switzerland have embarked on a journey of exploration and innovation bringing a strong business process focus into the humanitarian landscape. This move does not come easy in the non-profit sector where reluctance of NGOs can be observed, to understand themselves as complex, large-scale businesses which are in need of appropriate structures and systems. In the ICT arena, this often translates into underestimation of the information and data management needs relying on “do it yourself” approach. Bringing together ICT platforms such as iFormBuilder and Salesforce, Caritas in Jordan is transforming its service delivery systems to be more efficient and inclusive. Focus is put on identification of needs through a single data collection and assessment procedure and concentration of business process in an integrated CRM platform, reducing beneficiary fatigue, facilitating referral and simplifying the efficient provision of services to people in need. The highlights of this process have been: 1) a clear shift from single-purpose to integrated solutions that are able to encompass the whole width of the business process allowing for tailoring assistance to beneficiaries’ needs, 2) the practical application of ICT4D solutions as the main driving factor helping the staff embrace change from bottom up, and 3) donors’ readiness to support business transformation process which can ensure higher accountability and quality of service delivery and reporting.

Speakers
avatar for Lukas Voborsky

Lukas Voborsky

Regional Director - Syria Crisis Response, Caritas Switzerland
With extended professional experience in disaster management and background in IT and quantitative and qualitative research, Lukas Voborsky has been focusing on bringing innovation into the relief and development sectors throughout the years of his non-profit carrier. In the cont... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.05

16:15

Unified ICT solution for CRS’ resettlement project in the Philippines
Limited Capacity seats available

The Anibong community is an informal settlement of 2,600 families, located in a coastal area of northern Tacloban (The Philippines). The community was one of the hardest-hit by Super Typhoon Haiyan (November 8, 2013). Anibong residents have limited access to basic services and income-generating opportunities, and are highly exposed to hazards (both natural and man-made). CRS’ Anibong Resettlement Project (ARP) seeks to reverse the community’s situation, to support the most vulnerable households from Anibong to relocate to a safer area, with full access to basic services and livelihoods opportunities. The ARP has placed community participation at the foundation of the project, and is continuously providing Anibong residents opportunities to find their voices and learn how to make informed decisions.

In this session, the presenter will share the experience of implementing ICT4D in the project. These includes mobile data collection, development of custom database system, reporting, web hosting, data backup and security. This session will also include the use of Polinode, a tool that can analyze and visualize network data. It was used to build a graphic network that shows the preferences of family in terms of neighbors likelihood, that will be used by the Urban Planners to locate each family in the resettlement site.


Speakers
avatar for Radin Rubis

Radin Rubis

ICT4D Coordinator, Catholic Relief Services
Radin is the ICT4D Coordinator at Catholic Relief Services in the Philippines and based in Tacloban City. He is responsible of proposing, developing and implementing ICT4D solutions for monitoring and evaluation of Typhoon Haiyan Recovery Program. He is very passionate in develop... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.04

16:15

Delivering your learning content in a disconnected world
Limited Capacity seats available

According to Clayton R. Wright (International Education Consultant, Canada), there are 5 key barriers to educational technology adoption in the developing world: electrical power, Internet connectivity, training and professional development, valuing of teachers, and sustainability. The constant advance of technology creates endless possibilities for education, but when you work in the developing world, implementation and sustainability are challenging to achieve.

As an instructional designer, I have seen the pitfalls that befall an agency when they try to embrace the new technologies but really do not understand them. This session aims to help you choose the best platform so that your implementation is successful and sustainable. We will do this by comparing and contrasting LRS, LMS, CMS, and ADB platforms addressing:
• Digital learning terminology
• Learning in the digital age
• Data collection and offline access
• Content delivery and management

When you complete this session you will have a roadmap for selecting the best platform for delivering your learning content.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Moats

Laura Moats

Instructional Designer, eLearning MTO
Laura Moats helps clients produce and deliver training and documentation using her 20+ years of experience as an instructional designer, developer, technical writer, and translation manager. Laura has worked across many disciplines from healthcare, to nano-technology, to major re... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
2.02

16:15

e-Monitoring sytem: Stengthening government school monitoring system
Limited Capacity seats available

The Individual paper/poster presentation will on e-Monitoring System specifically designed for the use by school monitors to improve the accountability and governance of government primary school system. To strengthen the government school monitoring system of Bangladesh, the Sponsorship program of Bangladesh Save the Children created an android enabled school monitoring application based on the existing paper based school monitoring checklist and also developed a browser based school inspection data analysis dashboard with various analytical interactive reports. In collaboration with the Directorate of Primary Education (DPE), since 2015, the program has been piloting the e-monitoring system in 5 upazillas (sub-districts) of 3 districts with the Upazilla Education Officers (UEOs). The Assistant Upazilla Education Officers (AUEOs) of the pilot areas received tablets with the e-monitoring application installed and were trained on how to use the e-monitoring application for school monitoring. Grameenphone, a national telecommunications provider, under a MoU with Save the Children, supplied the tablets and internet connectivity for the pilot project. The operational management of the pilot program was made by the M & E sections of DPE. The mid-term progress review (November 2105) and the end-line pilot program evaluation (October 2016) reports identified that the e-Monitoring school system has been successful in creating a change in the government school monitoring system. The introduced digital school monitoring system is not simply a piece of technology that enables access to data. It is a mechanism that provides education officers from the local- to national-level with a potentially efficient, effective and transparent tool to improve the quality of education. The various stakeholders of the government primary system have got immediate access to information once data is uploaded in the server. It enables them the opportunity to analyze the robust data and take instant decision where necessary.

Speakers
avatar for Ruxana Parvin Hossain

Ruxana Parvin Hossain

Sr. Manager-ICT in Education, Save the Children
Ruxana Hossain Parvin has been involved in exploring the effectiveness of ICT-infused education on classroom pedagogy, students’ learning and tracking students’ performances. She has over 17 years of experiences in designing, developing and leading educational projects for ch... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
2.01

16:15

Increasing youth’s digital, vocational & entrepreneurial skills in Tanzania
Limited Capacity seats available

‘Cycle of Transformation’ (CoT) is a 3-year ICT4D innovation project grant from DFID. WV Tanzania is implementing the project in collaboration with 4 private and 8 public partners, including Tanzania Ministry of Education, and Vocational Training (MoEVT), Vocational Education Training Authority (VETA, Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA), Small Industries Development Organization (SIDO), Tanzania Ministry of Labor, Youth, Employment and People with Disability, and international partners Cisco, Intel Corporations, Microsoft, and World Vision US.

The project aims to empower 4,500 with hands-on experience in ICT vocational and entrepreneurship skills, integrating 21st century skills to enable youth to effectively use technology, think critically, solve problems, manage information and knowledge, as well as lead, communicate and collaborate. The specific objectives of this project are:
• Influence education reforms in Tanzania to include hands-on ICT vocational and entrepreneurship skills.
• Engage the Ministry of Labor & Employment to identify policies that can better emphasize strategic and intentional youth empowerment efforts, toward alleviation of the youth unemployment crisis.
• Introduce a partner’s youth empowerment hub that will be hosted at the MoL to harmonize youth empowerment efforts and align partner’s resources toward collective impact efforts.
• Influence endorsement by the Ministry of Science, Education and Technology through introduction of this technology innovation project, which will integrate the school-based student run enterprise (SBSRE) approach within vocational and secondary schools in Tanzania.
• Create a Youth Portal (Employability Platform): www.fursaworks.org developed in collaboration with Microsoft to connect youth with resources to enhance and develop skills needed to compete within the workforce.

Speakers
avatar for Nengarivo Teveli

Nengarivo Teveli

ICT4D Manager, World Vision International
Nengarivo Teveli is a Certified Project Management Professional and Electronics & Telecommunication Engineer with years of practical experience in management of development projects and programmes, including identification, design, initiation, planning, implementation, monitoring... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.06

16:15

Best practices using mHealth solutions for behavior change in LMIC
Limited Capacity seats available

A 2013 DHS report states Nigeria has a maternal mortality ratio of 576 deaths per 100,000 live births, and 34% of pregnant women reported receiving no antenatal care during pregnancy. The absence of accountability measures in health systems, and perception of the quality of maternal services, have influenced poor utilization of services.

Text2Speak is a Premium SMS service rating system that provides clients the opportunity to constructively provide feedback. The service is integrated with Pathfinder’s facility-based m4Change application and is automatically triggered after a woman has attended ANC. The purpose is to receive qualitative and quantitative insights into users’ perceptions of the access, quality, and reliability of services provided, with the aim to improve services by coordinating with government counterparts.

However, several challenges emerged which threatened the project's success. There were delays in engaging key partners, political transition in government, and poor acceptability amongst the target audience. To identify barriers to participation, Pathfinder monitored visits to the health facilities to conduct sensitization among users, monitored the system dashboard, and conducted phone interviews. Pathfinder discovered that although clients were receiving the SMS, response rate was very low.

Adapting to these challenges has provided valuable insight for Pathfinder’s future interventions, namely that the design and delivery of digital health solutions can only succeed by following an iterative and systematic approach, as recommended by the Principles of Digital Development.

This presentation aims for audience members to learn:
1.How behavior patterns in low-resource settings determine the success of SMS based digital health solutions.
2.Pathfinder’s lessons learned in creating meaningful engagement with the community through SMS polling
3.How to identify and respond to implementation challenges through an iterative process.
4.How to address challenges encountered while deploying digital health solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Ayomipo Edinger

Ayomipo Edinger

Senior Digital Health Officer, Pathfinder International
Ayomipo Edinger is currently Senior Officer for Digital Health & IT in Pathfinder International's Nigeria office where he manages several digital health projects. With over 10 years’ experience working for international development in varying roles, Ayomipo has developed a pass... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
2.04

16:15

eRegistries ecosystems - Data solutions for women's and children's health
Limited Capacity seats available

An eRegistry is an organized system for collecting, managing, analyzing, and most importantly, using data to improve women and children’s health.

eRegistries are strategically designed to facilitate data use – through accurate and easily available clinical decision support for health care providers, personalized messages to clients, and automated analysis and reporting to public health officials. These built-in features ensure timely use of data by all those who need it.

The evolution of health information from aggregate data reporting to individual-level data is becoming the new norm. Implementing eRegistries is, however, a far more fundamental leap than merely changing reporting routines and technology - it changes how health systems work. Based on point-of-care registration, data points drive decision support and workflows along and across the continuum of care, while indicators are derived and presented to supervisors and managers.

In implementation efforts, the eRegistries strategy prioritizes country ownership and collaboration to promote long term sustainability and scalability. The eRegistries toolkits are designed to be adapted and customized to each unique setting. Strategic features include: Safe, secure and ethical data collection, management, and storage; evidence-based reproductive health indicators derived from the WHO essential interventions; open source data collection platforms; and timely utilization of data by health care providers, women, families and public health officials.

To illustrate the criterions for successfully implementing eRegistries for maternal and child health, we will present experiences from diverse settings such as Palestine and Bangladesh on their path from innovation and research projects towards national scale.

Speakers
avatar for Frederik Frøen

Frederik Frøen

Head of Research, Norwegian Institute of Public Health
J. Frederik Frøen, MD, PhD (obstet), PhD (pediatr) is an ERC Consolidator Grantee, current Head of Research and former Director of the Department of International Health as well as the head of the reproductive, maternal and child health (RMNCH) team there. He is Director of the... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
2.05

16:15

Expanding healthcare access and delivery with a community health worker based digital clinical assessment platform
Limited Capacity seats available

Dr. Finette is a digital health pioneer and explores his experience of how digital health care is transforming lives at the last mile point of care. Over the last two years he has performed validation trials on over one thousand children on four continents, in five countries with world class partners such as UNICEF, Save the Children and the Ministry of Health in Ecuador. He discusses how his medical digital device was created using bayesian logic and why machine learning will play in integral role in the accuracy of delivering digital healthcare in the future. His presentation explores how digital health innovations can enable new business models and ultimately improve access to care and reduce overall health system expenditures.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Barry Finette

Dr. Barry Finette

Founder, THINKMD
Barry is a Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and an Attending and Teaching physician in the Pediatric Inpatient and Critical Care Division at the Vermont’s Children’s Hospital at the University of Vermont Medical Center. He is also the D... Read More →



Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
2.03

16:15

Use eDetection to find symptomatics of tuberculosis
Limited Capacity seats available

India is the country with the highest burden of Tuberculosis (TB). WHO claims, that there are ‘3 million missing TB patients’ worldwide that remain hidden in their homes, out of which 1/3rd are in India. No facility or service for detection and treatment is able to reach them. These people continue to infect others, as one TB patient is capable of infecting 10-12 others annually.

eDetection is the screening and identification of persons who may have come into contact with an infected pulmonary positive TB patient. The software works in two modes – Contact Tracing and Active Case Finding. In both the modes a TB suspect goes through a set of questions, if the answer to any of the questions is yes, the health worker enters the contact details of the TB suspect. The system then keeps track of the suspect through each stage of diagnosis namely – Sputum Result Pending, Antibiotics Medication, Repeat Sputum Result Pending, X-ray Result Pending. The diagnosis of a suspect is termed as ‘Completed’ if the diagnostic results are indicative of TB. If diagnostic results are negative the suspect is ‘Archived’ into the system. This whole process lets health workers realize the contact tracing methodology more efficiently. The application being a stable decision based algorithm can be used easily by the trained health workers from the community where the prevalence rate of TB is high without any supervision. The app has also been upgraded for detection of mental illness and depression to assess the mental health of TB patients and their families.

The Contact Tracing application works on the Android platform. The technology was developed in house at Operation ASHA. The eDetection project has been implemented in 31 centers of OpASHA, spread across 4 cities/tribal areas (Hubli, Bhubaneshwar, Dabra and Ghati Gaon) in 3 states (Karnataka,Madhya Pradesh and Orissa). All of these states are high burden areas with a prevalence rate ranging from 150-260 per lakh population.

In conclusion this is an effective & cost-efficient model that helps to curb the spread of tuberculosis.

Speakers
avatar for Sonali Batra

Sonali Batra

Deputy CTO, Operation ASHA
Sonali Batra is the Deputy CTO of Operation ASHA - the largest NGO in India and the third largest in the world that treats TB patients in 8 countries. She is also the CTO of mASHA Technologies - a for profit company that licenses a fully customisable eCompliance suite of software... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
VIP Lounge (2nd floor)

16:15

Community health supervision: Innovations for impact
Limited Capacity seats available

Approach: Community health services are critical to achieving SDG 3, and effective support supervision plays a crucial role in successful community health services. Recognizing this, the National Health Mission in the state of Uttar Pradesh (UP), India deployed ASHA Facilitators (AF) as supervisors to Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) in 2014. To strengthen supervisors’ support of ASHAs, boost accountability, and improve use of data, the Government of UP and CRS have jointly employed custom-built mobile based applications for AFs. This unique ICT tool has reduced paperwork, increased substantive supervisory visits, improved the quality and speed of reporting, promoted transparency, and enabled data to be used for decision-making.

Results: The application captures real time data and generates monthly reports for government managers, promoting quick access to data for evidence-based decisions, discussions on priority supervision areas, and understanding of capacity building needs for AFs and ASHAs. Live dashboards provide accessible information to government officials at multiple levels. New features include monitoring of essential drug stocks, reporting infant and maternal deaths. Using the application for performance-based payment of AFs is in development.

As of Sep. 2016, program results include:
- 40% increase in the proportion of AFs who guide their ASHAs in uncompleted tasks.
- 46% increase in the proportion of AFs who discuss with ASHAs coverage of marginalized communities.
- 56% decrease in the proportion of ASHAs reporting families’ resistant to support.

Scale-up: Recognizing the intervention’s effectiveness and the potential to achieve wide impacts with modest investment, the state governments of UP and Meghalaya are planning to scale up this application in 2017 to 618 AFs who supervise 11,085 ASHAs. Six other states have also expressed interest in adopting the intervention.

The presentation will share the main features of the application and how it improves health worker performance, management decisions, and accountability.

Speakers
avatar for Satish Srivastava

Satish Srivastava

Health and Nutrition Manager, Catholic Relief Services
Satish oversees the ReMiND project, an mHealth initiative of CRS in India. He also supports nutrition programming in the CRS India country program. Before joining CRS in 2009, he has been engaged in planning, executing and monitoring key public health and nutrition interventions... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.10

16:15

Do fingerprint biometrics work in developing countries?
Limited Capacity seats available

Biometrics like fingerprints have been used widely to solve identification and verification challenges in national ID programs, voting, and the provision of key services. But just how accurate are fingerprint technologies designed in the West when they are used in developing countries? The most advanced fingerprinting systems on the market are not designed for frontline workers. High humidity as well as dry, dusty environments drastically affect the performance of current systems. Striking a good balance between cost and performance of current systems is not straight-forward. Our team has collected over 130,000 fingerprints across two continents, comparing the performance of six different fingerprinting systems. The results show that high levels of manual labor, scarring, and thermal burns common in low-income populations in Africa significantly reduce the accuracy of some fingerprint technologies more than others. We share the results of this research along with recommendations on how to optimize hardware, software, and training elements for successful biometric deployments.

Speakers
avatar for Sebastian Manhart

Sebastian Manhart

Director of Business Development, Simprints
Sebastian is the Director of Business Development at Simprints, a non-profit tech start-up backed by USAID, DFID, GIF, and the Gates Foundation focused on providing biometric identification in the world´s harshest settings. Sebastian’s academic background is in development eco... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.09

16:15

Global goals for local impact - Implementing SDGs at a subnational level
Limited Capacity seats available

The Global Goals for Local Impact project is designed to be implemented in conjunction with the local administration at village level in Kenya, involving in particular, the Chief (who leads a location, which is the smallest administrative geographical unit in Kenya), the Assistant County Commissioner who leads a division (a group of locations) and the Deputy County Commissioner, who leads a subcounty/district (a group of divisions). The project also involves community leaders who are elected by the citizens to represent a group of households in working with their area chief on matters of security and development.

The premise of the project is that citizens care more about development in the context of their immediate surroundings more than at national or even county level in Kenya.

Objectives of the Project:
- Improve awareness on the SDGs and its targets and indicators to promote the empowerment of the community.
- Increase access to citizen-generated dis-aggregated data, information, and evidence to better map the community landscape and identify community development and service delivery needs.
- Enhance data literacy, and use of enabling technology; in particular information and communications technology, that promotes collective action and campaigns for community empowerment and improved service delivery at sub-national level.
- Promote evidence-based engagement between the community and local government decision makers to strengthen citizen voice, participation, and increased resource allocation to community development projects and service delivery.

To realise these objectives the following activities, outputs, and outcomes were undertaken in 3 phases listed in brackets under each output

Phase I - Community and local administration consultations, awareness raising and community training

Phase II - Data collection, analysis, visualizations and packaging of advocacy/campaigning material

Phase III - Evidence-based community engagement and campaigns (closing feedback loop), County Government

This presentation will highlight this implementation.

Speakers
avatar for Al Kags

Al Kags

Founder / Trsutee, Open Institute
Al Kags is Founder and Trustee of Open Institute, and leads program direction. He is a Mandela Washington Fellow (2014) and was recognized as a New Generation African Leader (2013). In Kenya, Al has worked with the government to develop and implement ICT policy. He was responsibl... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.07

16:15

Opportunities and challenges in working with low resource languages
Limited Capacity seats available

Africa’s Voices Foundation (AVF) is a not-for-profit organisation, developed from cutting-edge research at the University of Cambridge. Our methods were developed to overcome the challenge of engaging with hard-to-reach citizens through leveraging existing communication channels such as radio and social media. In these channels, we curate conversations in order to create a context where the audiences feel a familiarity and a willingness to participate. We then use methods from data science, social science and our contextual knowledge to analyse large volumes of conversational data, combining insights derived from these conversations with socio-demographic data. This approach has allowed us to move beyond the ""what"" and ""who"" of surveys to also provide insight into ""why"" something matters – expressed in citizens’ own language and emic perspectives. We have so far worked with UNICEF Somalia, Oxfam in Kenya, BBC Media Action, Cambridge and Makerere Universities, and Emmy-award winning the Well Told Story, and Livity Africa. Topics have included health in Somalia and oil and gas extraction in North Kenya.

This presentation talks about the challenges and opportunities involved in analysing large volumes of conversational data in low resource languages in Africa.  There are currently few resources that aid the computational analysis of such large textual datasets and this makes the development of these resources both time- and resource-intensive. Some of the solutions we have developed so far to address this challenge includes building customised language banks, testing machine learning approaches for labelling data, and developing new tools to speed up the process of labelling data. Focusing on our ongoing work with UNICEF in Somalia and with Well Told Story in Kenya, the presentation outlines what are some of the lessons learned from this process – the challenges involved but also the opportunities of sharing resources among the ICT4D community to address thes knowledge gaps.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Matti Pohjonen

Dr. Matti Pohjonen

Senior Researcher, Africa's Voices Foundation
Prior to joining Africa’s Voices as a Senior Researcher, Matti worked as a Research Fellow for the VOX-Pol Network of Excellence and for the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCLMP), at the University of Oxford, on project mapping social media discussions in Ethio... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.08

16:55

Transition Time
Monday May 15, 2017 16:55 - 17:00
HICC

17:00

Agriculture & Environment Track Panel: Comparing & contrasting knowledge services for rural households
Over the last several years, many innovative organizations have been scaling up the use of ICT to reach rural households with access to knowledge. Examples of this knowledge include agriculture tips, health guidance, and market price and weather information.

This panel will assemble some of the leaders in this area to briefly describe their service, advocate for their strengths, and acknowledge their weaknesses.

Will we agree that a different solution is the best-in-class for a particular context, or will competitors on the panel engage in a respectful and enlightening debate?

Questions to be discussed may include:
- Who is the target audience of each service?
- What type of content is delivered by each service? Are there innovations in content from some services that could be adopted by others?
- How do we measure the outputs, outcomes, and impact of each?
- What is the cost structure of each service, and who is the customer?
- How does each service address sustainability? Are they dependent on donor funds?

The panel will engage with the audience for questions, opinions, and stories of their own experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Bright Schandorf Adu

Bright Schandorf Adu

Director of Farmer Services, Farmerline Limited
As Farmerline’s Director of Farmer Services, Schandorf manages a team of eight and is responsible for leading training workshops for farmers, conducting user research, collecting data and M&E. Taking advantage of his relationships with farming communities and a deep understandi... Read More →
avatar for Vinay Kumar

Vinay Kumar

Regional Director for Asia & Global Initiatives, Digital Green
Vinay leads Digital Green's program strategy and development. He has been instrumental in scaling its community video approach across India and Africa, reaching over 1.5 million small holder farmers, producing over 4500 community videos and positively impacting their lives.
avatar for Melissa Persaud

Melissa Persaud

Director of Partnerships, VOTO Mobile
Melissa Persaud is Director of Partnerships at VOTO Mobile, a global mobile engagement social enterprise. In her role, she builds and maintains partnerships with impact-oriented organizations in order to provide better choices for more voices around the globe. Personally, Melissa... Read More →
avatar for Cliff Schmidt

Cliff Schmidt

Founder & Executive Director, Literacy Bridge
Cliff founded Literacy Bridge in 2007 to make agriculture and health knowledge accessible to people without literacy skills in remote rural areas. He created an audio-based device called the "Talking Book", which led to a fellowship award presented by Bill Gates and a Clinton Glo... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
Gallery

17:00

Data-driven Adaptation & Strategy Track Panel
Speakers
avatar for Jessica Barrette

Jessica Barrette

Business Analyst, Plan International Australia
Hi There! | | Jess Barrette is a Business Analyst/Project Manager with 12 years broad range experience consulting in global, national and local large scale Lean and Agile technology projects within the banking, technology, energy, insurance and government sectors. | | J... Read More →
avatar for Shez Farooq

Shez Farooq

Senior MIS Specialist / Senior IT and Operations Consultant, Development Pathways
Shez Farooq is a Senior MIS Specialist at Development Pathways with over 17 years of experience. Shez advises on MIS design and development for social protection schemes and is currently supporting developing countries to integrate data and information management across their soc... Read More →
avatar for Steve Hellen

Steve Hellen

Director, ICT4D & GIS, Catholic Relief Services
Steve Hellen has nearly 20 years of information technology experience. He joined Catholic Relief Services in 2012 to lead a team focused on Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) and improvements to systems throughout the agency. He managed the implement... Read More →
avatar for Erick Ngwiri

Erick Ngwiri

Director of Client Solutions, Ona
Erick is a dynamic international development, management and information systems professional with over 8 years’ experience in the development, sale and implementation of strategic information technology systems globally. | | He has extensive experience in analyzing busine... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
Ballroom

17:00

Digital Financial Inclusion Track Panel: Yesterday, today and tomorrow - the transformative impact of DFS on low-income consumers
Speakers
avatar for Joseph Dougherty

Joseph Dougherty

Partner and Regional Director, the Americas, Dalberg Global Advisors
Joe Dougherty is a Partner at Dalberg who has served as a trusted advisor to leading financial institutions, government agencies, corporations and foundations for twenty years and has worked in more than thirty countries. Joe has worked with established companies like Visa Inc an... Read More →
avatar for Reuben Gicheha

Reuben Gicheha

Program Officer,Financial Inclusion, AGRA
Reuben has over 10 years experience in the financial inclusion space in Kenya having with the two leading banks in Kenya.He pioneered the KCB Mpesa micro lending business before moving to AGRA in the MasterCard Foundation funded financial inclusion program.He is the lead for Keny... Read More →
avatar for Natalia Pshenichnaya

Natalia Pshenichnaya

Head of mAgri and mHealth programmes, GSMA
Natalia Pshenichnaya is the Head of the GSMA mNutrition, comprising of mHealth and mAgri programmes, overseeing a global portfolio of projects. Natalia has been working on implementation as well as research on mobile solutions for rural since 2010 across Asia and Africa.


Monday May 15, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
G.01

17:00

Disaster Management Track Panel
Speakers
avatar for Isaac Kwamy

Isaac Kwamy

Director, Global Programs, Humanitarian Disaster Management, NetHope
Isaac is presently the Global Programs Director of Humanitarian Operations and Disaster Management for NetHope. Isaac leads NetHope’s Global Humanitarian Operations Programs including Emergency Preparedness, Response & Recovery efforts, Crisis Informatics, Access to Information as Aid and Humanitarian Digital Financial Services (Cash programing). This includes providing leadership, oversight and execution of... Read More →
avatar for Leonardo Milano

Leonardo Milano

Senior Data Scientist, IDMC - Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre NRC – Norwegian Refugee Council
Passionate about how innovation can help solve humanitarian challenges, in 2016 Leonardo joined the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) to carry out cutting-edge research on displacement related to conflicts and natural disasters worldwide. Trained as a physicist, Leon... Read More →
avatar for Radin Rubis

Radin Rubis

ICT4D Coordinator, Catholic Relief Services
Radin is the ICT4D Coordinator at Catholic Relief Services in the Philippines and based in Tacloban City. He is responsible of proposing, developing and implementing ICT4D solutions for monitoring and evaluation of Typhoon Haiyan Recovery Program. He is very passionate in develop... Read More →
avatar for Sailesh Savani

Sailesh Savani

FOUNDER & CEO, COMPULYNX LTD
I am passionate about transforming lives of people who have been displaced or whose lives have been disrupted for no fault of their own. | | I am a B.Com from Bombay Uni, a Dip Comp Sc. Bombay & Entrepreneur’s Master Program at MIT Boston. I've been in Tech industry for... Read More →
avatar for Frank Schott

Frank Schott

Vice President of Global Programs, NetHope
Frank Schott joined NetHope in 2005, and served as Managing Director of Global Programs for 11 years. In 2016, he took on the role of Vice President of Global Programs, where he oversees Field Programs. During his time with NetHope, Frank has worked closely with member agencies... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
G.03

17:00

Education & Livelihoods Track Panel: Learning-People, Processes or Platform
Speakers
avatar for Chris Benner

Chris Benner

Professor and Director, Everett Program for Technology and Social Change, University of California Santa Cruz
Dr. Chris Benner is the Dorothy E. Everett Chair in Global Information and Social Entrepreneurship, Director of the Everett Program for Technology and Social Change, and a Professor of Environmental Studies and Sociology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research e... Read More →
avatar for Anindya Chattopadhyay

Anindya Chattopadhyay

People Development Officer, iMerit Technology Services Pvt Ltd
Anindya has over 20 years of international and domestic project management experience for BPOs and audit firms, such as Tathya Dot Com, Ray & Ghosh, and J. Chakraborty & Co. At iMerit, Anindya uses his quality assurance expertise to manage iMerit delivery operations and p... Read More →
avatar for Dr. PS Gohil

Dr. PS Gohil

Manager, Software Development, Anudip Foundation
Dr. PS has led Anudip's student management platform development since June 2015. Previously, he held teaching positions in Computer Science at the College for Advanced Computer & Information Technology, conducting undergraduate and post-graduate level university courses for stude... Read More →
avatar for Jodi Lis

Jodi Lis

Senior Technical Advisor, Jhpiego
Jodi Lis is a Senior Technical Advisor at Jhpiego. She is part of the Digital Health team, focusing on the use of technology in learning. She has 20 years experience designing and implementing activities to integrate technology, eLearning and digital tools into workforce developm... Read More →
avatar for Laura Moats

Laura Moats

Instructional Designer, eLearning MTO
Laura Moats helps clients produce and deliver training and documentation using her 20+ years of experience as an instructional designer, developer, technical writer, and translation manager. Laura has worked across many disciplines from healthcare, to nano-technology, to major re... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
G.02

17:00

Health Track Panel
Speakers
avatar for Dr. John Mark Bwanika

Dr. John Mark Bwanika

Founding Partner and Director, The Medical Concierge Group Limited
Medical doctor with 7 years' experience in HIV care and research. Founding partner of an indigenous digital health company that's leading the design and implementation architecture of various mHealth and e-health programs in Uganda; and soon Kenya and Nigeria. Passionate about he... Read More →
avatar for Ayomipo Edinger

Ayomipo Edinger

Senior Digital Health Officer, Pathfinder International
Ayomipo Edinger is currently Senior Officer for Digital Health & IT in Pathfinder International's Nigeria office where he manages several digital health projects. With over 10 years’ experience working for international development in varying roles, Ayomipo has developed a pass... Read More →
avatar for Jacqueline Edwards

Jacqueline Edwards

Chief Operating Officer, Medic Mobile
Jacqueline previously worked in partnerships and strategic initiatives in the Global Tobacco Control Branch at CDC and as a Senior Program Officer focused on public-private partnerships at the CDC Foundation. She has focused on community led program development across diverse ini... Read More →
avatar for Emily Taylor

Emily Taylor

Director of Communications, Vecna Cares
I wear many hats at Vecna Cares, a non profit company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. We design and deploy information management and technology solutions to create measureable impact, helping people in low resource settings live healthier and better lives. We build systems t... Read More →
avatar for Fredrik Winsnes

Fredrik Winsnes

Director, Global Programs, NetHope
Fredrik Winsnes joined NetHope in 2011 and is currently responsible for the NetHope Solutions Center and the NetHope Leadership Institute . Through education and collaboration, the NetHope Solutions Center aims at assisting NetHope members and likeminded organizations to maximize... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
2.03

17:00

Partnerships & Collaborative Solutions Track Panel
Speakers
avatar for Rosa Akbari

Rosa Akbari

Sr. Advisor, Technology for Development, Mercy Corps
Rosa Akbari is a Senior Technology for Development Advisor at Mercy Corps. In this role, she helps leverage lowest common denominator technologies throughout Mercy Corps’ programming worldwide. Rosa has worked at the intersect of humanitarian response & technology for the past... Read More →
avatar for Magnus Mordu Conteh

Magnus Mordu Conteh

Director of Global Health Programmes, Strategic Partnerships and Innovation, World Vision International
Magnus joined World Vision Ireland in 2011 as Health Programme Coordinator for the Irish Aid funded Maternal Newborn and Child Health programme that is being implemented through the Ministries of Health in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Mauritania and Sierra Leone. In addition to mana... Read More →
avatar for Sebastian Manhart

Sebastian Manhart

Director of Business Development, Simprints
Sebastian is the Director of Business Development at Simprints, a non-profit tech start-up backed by USAID, DFID, GIF, and the Gates Foundation focused on providing biometric identification in the world´s harshest settings. Sebastian’s academic background is in development eco... Read More →
avatar for Derek Treatman

Derek Treatman

Director of Technology Solutions, Vital Wave
Mr. Treatman has a background in electrical and computer engineering with unique ability to apply ICT expertise to policy and fieldwork. He has implemented and pioneered variety of mService pilots and ICT4D projects. Most recently, he has worked with the Ministry of Health in Eth... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
Hall 1

17:30

Big Data Launch Reception

CGIAR, a global research partnership for a food-secure future, will be launching the CGIAR Platform for Big Data in Agriculture. This new multimillion-dollar initiative aims to fundamentally disrupt food production across the developing world, making it more productive, efficient, and resilient to challenges such as climate change – all through the power of information.

Bringing together thousands of experts - from agricultural scientists to whizz kids at some of the world’s leading tech firms - the Platform will collect and analyze vast amounts of data on crops, weather, soils and more. It will produce some of the most precise and reliable recommendations that farmers in developing countries have ever had, helping ensure that smallholders enjoy the benefits of the data revolution.

CGIAR is a global research partnership for a food-secure future. CGIAR science is dedicated to reducing poverty, enhancing food and nutrition security, and improving natural resources and ecosystem services.

Food and beverages served.


Speakers
avatar for Dr. David Bergvinson

Dr. David Bergvinson

Director General, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)
David joined ICRISAT in January 2015 to lead its strategy development to ensure science, demand-driven innovation and strategic partnerships come together to translate science into prosperity for rural families in the dryland tropics of Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. | | Prior t... Read More →
avatar for Andy Jarvis

Andy Jarvis

Research Area Director, CGIAR
Dr. Andy Jarvis is the Director of the Decision and Policy Analysis Area in the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and is a Flagship Leader on the CGIAR Research Program for Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), based in Cali, Colombia.  Andy i... Read More →
avatar for Jawoo Koo

Jawoo Koo

Senior Research Fellow, Environment and Production Technology Division, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
Jawoo Koo is a Senior Research Fellow for the Environment and Production Technology Division at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and a co-pioneer of the CGIAR Platform for Big Data in Agriculture. At IFPRI he leads Spatial Data and Analytics Theme, where a team of researchers with multiple disciplinary backgrounds work on agroecological and socio-economic datasets and analytics. Jawoo received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department of the University of Florida where he specialized in process-based crop modeling applications for... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for CGIAR

CGIAR

Exhibit: CGIAR Platform for Big Data in Agriculture | The CGIAR Platform for Big Data in Agriculture is where information becomes power: power to predict, prescribe, and produce more food, more sustainably. It democratizes decades of agricultural data empowering analysists, statisticians, programmers and more to mine information for trends and quirks, and develop rapid, accurate and compelling recommendations for farmers, researchers and policymakers... Read More →
avatar for ICRISAT

ICRISAT

Exhibit: Digital Agriculture: Pathway to Prosperity for better, faster and cheaper agri extension and advisory services through digital technology. | About: ICRISAT is a non profit, non political organization that conducts agricultural  research for development in Semi-Arid Tropi... Read More →


Monday May 15, 2017 17:30 - 19:30
Hall 3
 
Tuesday, May 16
 

09:00

Panel: Hype and Reality: Big Data

What is Big Data? The term is now ubiquitous and all the hype will have us believe that it’s a magic wand that can solve all problems. However, how much of this is hype and how much is reality?

To debate this question and develop meaningful insights, we must understand the concept of “Big Data” - data sets that are so large or complex that only recent innovations in data processing applications have provided us the capability to manage and process them – data sets whose volumes are measured in petabytes (1015bytes) of data. We also need to understand the three primary sources of such data:

  • Social Data: Data that provides remarkable insights on consumer behavior and sentiment, for example Tweets (500 million are posted on Twitter every day), Facebook likes (a half million are posted every minute), and YouTube videos - 300 hours of video are uploaded every minute;
  • Machine Data: Large volumes of spatially tagged data generated from the Internet of Things, for example information generated from industrial equipment, field sensors, web logs, genomics data from biological organisms, and imagery from phones, drones and satellites;
  • Transactional Data: Multitudes of data generated from billions of digital transactions.

Finally, we must be able to answer the questions of how developing economies can leverage Big Data to support sustainable and equitable development, bring together public and private sectors efforts and create the appropriate policy environment in service of achieving the SDGs.  The panelists will explore these questions.  They will look at case studies that illustrate the ways in which Big Data contributes to their industries and their relation to specific SDGs to assess how much is hype versus reality including:

  • DuPont’s use of data from the Global Food Security Index to assess progress in eliminating hunger (SDG2),
  • Dalberg’s use of Big Data to improve program targeting, surface challenges and assess their impacts,
  • Mahyco’s use of Big Data to improve crops, implement precision agriculture and adapt to climate change.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. David Bergvinson

Dr. David Bergvinson

Director General, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)
David joined ICRISAT in January 2015 to lead its strategy development to ensure science, demand-driven innovation and strategic partnerships come together to translate science into prosperity for rural families in the dryland tropics of Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. | | Prior t... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Ranjan Patnaik

Dr. Ranjan Patnaik

Director, DuPont Knowledge Center, Technology Director SA & ASEAN, DuPont
Dr Ranjan Patnaik is the Director of DuPont Knowledge Center (DKC) at Hyderabad, India. DKC is an integrated R&D facility with about 300 scientists & engineers supporting a pipeline that spans across diverse segments ranging from agriculture, materials science, to industrial biotechnology. In this role, he is responsible for managing the strategic... Read More →
avatar for Frederic Pivetta

Frederic Pivetta

Co-Founder & Managing Partner, Dalberg Data Insights
Frederic Pivetta is Managing Partner of Dalberg Data Insights, which is the Big Data entity of the Dalberg Group. Previously, he was part of the founding team of Real Impact Analytics since 2011, aiming at developing Big Data apps for telecom operators mostly in emerging economie... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Usha Zehr

Dr. Usha Zehr

Chief Technology Officer, Maharashtra Hybrid Seeds Company Private Limited (Mahyco)
Dr. Usha Zehr is the Chief Technology Officer at the Maharashtra Hybrid Seeds Company (Mahyco), one of the leading agri-biotech companies in India. She has played a pivotal role in various innovations and technology applications in agriculture, especially hybrid seeds and biotech crops. She was instrumental in bringing... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 09:00 - 09:40
Hall 3

09:40

Monitoring and Promoting the SDGs Through the (Big) Data Revolution: Towards a Theory and Methodology

Two years after their formal adoption, there is an urgent need to mobilize the “Data Revolution” in general, and its core component Big Data in particular, to reach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The hope is that the (Big) Data Revolution will reshape and upgrade current power dynamics and decision-making systems for the better. That this revolution will move us towards a world where public interventions are designed and evaluated against evidence, discussions and decisions are more firmly grounded in facts and shared experiences, and more voices are heard and considered. That it will serve development and democracy in the age of post-truth politics. The fear is that data can be and indeed has been used to entrench power dynamics and decision-making systems that fuel adverse outcomes (deprivation, violence, pollution, congestion, waste, wars, distrust, disdain, etc.) That data will be used to impede progress towards the goals. Thus, the question is: What can and should be done to seed and support a virtuous data-enabled process of social transformation through innovation and inclusion – a transformation in which the SDGs are much more systematically monitored and promoted?

This overarching question raises two more. First, what is the theory of societal change explicitly or implicitly put forth by the strongest advocates of the SDGs? And how valid is that theory? In other words: what are we saying or selling about the causal impact of measurement and evidence more largely? When we measure the height of our young kids and put a mark on the wall, is it to check if they have grown according to plans?  So as to feed them better if they haven’t? Of course not. This isn’t to say there is no instrumental value in the outcome of measurement, but rather to stress the role of the process itself.

Secondly, how can the instrumental role of measurement—via greater accountability and efficiency—be materialized, and magnified? For all the talk about the importance of measuring the SDGs to get closer to achieving them, surprisingly little has been done towards that objective. Despite the hope that Big Data could help fill “data gaps” and perhaps even fix the “statistical tragedy” in the poorest countries, there is, as of now, no body of stable, scalable methodologies to ‘leverage’ Big Data to make a significant contribution to measuring the SDGs in the next decade. Even after 10 years following the emergence of Big Data as a socio-technological phenomenon and ecosystem. Even after publication of dozens of case studies and academic papers confirming their potential. Why is that? Can this be changed and if so how?

These are some of the questions this talk will address in proposing a theoretical and methodological framework for monitoring and promoting the SDGs through the (Big) Data Revolution – a framework based on the work and vision of Data-Pop Alliance.


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Emmanuel Letouzé

Dr. Emmanuel Letouzé

Director & Co-Founder/Data Pop Alliance, Visiting Scholar/MIT Media Lab
Dr. Emmanuel Letouzé is the Director and co-Founder of Data-Pop Alliance, a coalition on Big Data and development co-created in 2013 by the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, MIT Media Lab, Overseas Development Institute, and joined in 2016 by the Flowminder Foundation as its 4th core member. Emmanuel is a Visiting Scholar at MIT Media Lab, a Research Affiliate at HHI and a Research Associate at ODI. He is the author of UN Global... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 09:40 - 09:55
Hall 3

09:55

Data Analytics, Technology and Public Health
Data analytics enabled through technology at the individual-, community- and planetary-level is being used to improve individual and population health by integrating and synthesizing data across vast magnitudes of scale.

Today, our daily decisions about health often stem from data analytics using technology near and far (eg, from our wrists to outer space). If we consider the health effects associated with air pollution, such as particulate matter 2.5 ug/m3 or PM2.5 - usually generated by combustion, smog, diesel and gasoline sources, is thirty times smaller than the human hair and penetrates deep into the small airways of the respiratory tract - the technology that is being used to generate big data and fuel data analytics in this area varies immensely by scale and granularity. And it’s defining how we approach air pollution-associated disease prevention and control around the world.

At a larger scale, it enables us to highlight geographic hot spots, observe seasonal and secular trends and predict PM2.5 levels where local data don’t exist by using light-scattering satellite imagery. At a local level, it allows environmental advocates to inform policy makers on air pollution control measures using geo-visualization tools to target and protect vulnerable populations based on socio-economic determinants such as use of biomass fuel for cooking in rural areas or distance to high-traffic roads, bus stations and nearby power plants in urban areas. And at a more individual level, it allows health professionals to use epidemiological bio-marker cohorts to focus on medically susceptible populations such as young children, the elderly or those suffering from asthma or cardiovascular disease. What’s interesting is that the technology and data analytics inputs for these decisions can be equally important whether it comes from our wrists, the neighborhood monitoring station, a database listing brick kilns in the region, or a satellite in outer space; and extremely powerful when taken together and integrated as a whole.

So the decision to go out for a walk, take an auto or ride the metro for an individual on a high pollution day in New Delhi, can stem from his wearable device reading at that minute, a Harvard scientist’s prediction modelling in Boston, an engineer’s database in Goa, an epidemiologist’s cohort surveillance in Chennai and a big data analyst in Seattle.

For public health and environmental experts, this is the world of air pollution and disease control today. And this potential of technology and data analytics to drive the betterment of our health and planet, is spawning the next generation of change-makers for tomorrow.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Preet Dhillon

Dr. Preet Dhillon

Senior Research Scientist and Associate Professor, Public Health Foundation of India
Dr. Preet K. Dhillon has a background in global cancer epidemiology and experience from several organizations in the US and India. She is a trained Epidemiologist who has worked on cancer and other NCD’s as a Senior Research Scientist and Associate Professor at the Public Health Foundation of... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 09:55 - 10:10
Hall 3

10:10

Panel: Leveraging the Power of Geospatial Visualization and Analytics for Development
There are many technical experts, researchers and analysts making valuable contributions to the development and humanitarian fields. However, their work can sometimes be difficult to interpret, understand and act on. How can ICT professionals use geospatial tools, analytics and visualizations to communicate insights and findings to a wide range of stakeholders that are critical to the success of development and humanitarian efforts?

Join us for a discussion with a diverse group of practitioners who use various geospatial analysis and visualization approaches to help communicate key messages and findings derived from complex data and information without overwhelming their audience.

Our panelists will share their experience about how they use geospatial technology to analyze data and create informative and compelling visualizations to communicate complex analytical insights that improve coordination, situational awareness and communicate results to beneficiaries, funders and advocates.

Moderators
avatar for Chuck Conley

Chuck Conley

Nonprofit and Global Organizations Account Manager, Environmental Systems Research Institution (Esri)
Chuck Conley is an Account Manager with Esri’s Nonprofits & Global Organizations Team. He is passionate about advancing the use of Geography and GIS technology in the humanitarian and development fields. For the first 17 years of his GIS career he worked to directly support a w... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Leonardo Milano

Leonardo Milano

Senior Data Scientist, IDMC - Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre NRC – Norwegian Refugee Council
Passionate about how innovation can help solve humanitarian challenges, in 2016 Leonardo joined the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) to carry out cutting-edge research on displacement related to conflicts and natural disasters worldwide. Trained as a physicist, Leon... Read More →
avatar for Tyler Radford

Tyler Radford

Executive Director, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT)
Tyler Radford currently serves as HOT’s Executive Director. He joined HOT in April 2015 after 12 years leading diverse, people-focused technology and data-enabled projects across the public, private, nonprofit, and international humanitarian sectors for organizations such as the American Red Cross, Save the Children, the United Nations Secretariat, and for Fortune 500 firms as a private sector consultant with Deloitte Consulting. In his role at HOT, Tyler oversees a team of 22 staff deployed globally and works to engage and coordinate the efforts of thousands of HOT disaster mapping volunteers for projects in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. Prior to joining HOT, Tyler led the American Red Cross Hurricane Sandy (New York) community disaster recovery strategy development and implementation and directed a team of community recovery specialists engaging affected residents and community organizations on the ground. Before joining the Red Cross, Tyler worked in a number of post-disaster and community development contexts in the U.S. and internationally. He taught in Metropolitan College of New... Read More →
avatar for Prukalpa Sankar

Prukalpa Sankar

Co-Founder, Socialcops
Prukalpa is the co-founder of SocialCops, a data intelligence company that empowers organizations to make tough decisions and solve some of the world’s most critical problems using data and technology. Their platform brings the entire decision-making process to one place — from collecting primary data and accessing secondary data to merging internal data and visualizing data via easy-to-use dashboards. SocialCops works with over 150 organizations in more than seven countries, on problems as diverse as driving rapid village development, tracking national welfare schemes, and optimizing marketing campaign locations. Their work spans different sectors with partners such as the Gates Foundation, Tata Trusts, United Nations, Government of India, Unilever and Frost... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 10:10 - 10:50
Hall 3

10:50

Empowering People with Big Data

The volume of earth observation and environmental data is growing rapidly, as is the urgent need for insights that can be derived from such data to inform decisions in a range of development areas including food and water security, sustainable natural resource management, disease early warning and disaster risk management.  Unfortunately, taking full advantage of these resources has historically required considerable technical expertise and effort. One major hurdle is in basic information technology management: data acquisition and storage; databases and computing.  This burden can put these invaluable data and tools out of the reach of many potential users, restricting access to experts with special access to high-performance computing resources.

In this talk, Rebecca will share examples and experiences of partners in the development community using the power of the cloud to overcome these issues. Emerging cloud technologies such as Google’s Earth Engine platform illustrate a new paradigm whereby anyone, anywhere with a web browser can have petabytes of fresh, relevant data at their fingertips, together with massive computational resources and peer-reviewed scientific methodologies to derive actionable insights from local to global scale.  Cloud-based approaches can also facilitate collaboration and easy dissemination of results to policy makers, field practitioners and civil society.

Partner projects will be presented which illustrate best practices in water resource mapping, crop yield estimation, disease early warning and flood monitoring.  Rebecca will also discuss lessons learned based on more than a decade of work in this area, touching on both opportunities and challenges in empowering people with big data to address significant sustainable development issues of our time. 


Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Moore

Rebecca Moore

Director, Google Earth, Earth Engine & Outreach, Google
Rebecca Moore is Director of Google Earth, Earth Engine and Earth Outreach. She initiated and leads the development of Google Earth Engine, a cloud technology platform that puts an unprecedented amount of satellite data online and enables scientists to conduct global-scale monitoring and measurement of changes in the... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 10:50 - 11:15
Hall 3

11:15

Coffee & Tea Break
Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:15 - 11:45
Hall 4

11:45

Mobile commerce for the BoP
Limited Capacity seats available

Incomes of smallholder farmers (SHF) in Africa remain stubbornly low, largely due to low productivity levels, high post-harvest losses and lack of market information on the value of their crop, among other factors. Increasing productivity is a vital strategy for poverty reduction among farmers that are unable to expand their land holding.

Access to and proper use of inputs such as fertilizer, seeds and pesticides are key to increasing productivity. Input usage among smallholder farmers in Africa is low; average application of fertilizer in SSA is 9kg per hectare, compared to a recommended amount of 50kg. Among the reasons for low input usage are high costs of inputs and lack of access to capital to procure inputs.

Esoko seeks to transform agriculture in Africa by pioneering the field of mobile commerce for smallholder farmers. We have developed a virtual marketplace that connects SHF to inputs, finance and commodity markets. Through this platform, farmers lay away cash towards the purchase of agricultural inputs through a mobile money wallet. Once a farmer builds a transactional history on the platform, financial institutions can use this information to undertake credible risk assessment for loan disbursement. In the future, farmers will also be able to sell their produce to buyers on the platform.

We call our mobile commerce solution ‘Alibaba for smallholder farmers in Africa’; because like Alibaba, it’s designed to make it easier for small farm businesses to buy and sell goods and services. Our vision is to empower millions of rural buyers and sellers in Africa to prosper by connecting them to information, finance and markets.

Through this presentation, we hope to share our journey in developing and implementing this innovative solution in Ghana and Kenya.

Speakers
avatar for Hillary Miller-Wise

Hillary Miller-Wise

Chief Executive Officer, Esoko Networks
Hillary is CEO of Esoko, a pioneer in the use of mobile technology to link farmers to markets. Before joining Esoko, she led Grameen Foundation's mobile technology programs across Africa, and served as Country Director for TechnoServe in Tanzania, where she forged mobile agriculture partnerships with Vodafone and Tigo. Earlier in her career... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.03

11:45

Mobile phone for community resilience
Limited Capacity seats available

Bangladesh is one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. Changes in rainfall pattern and seasonality are evident. Frequency and intensity of natural calamities have increased. To cope with the climate change there are adaptation in agriculture. The 7th five years plan has targeted ‘Digital Bangladesh’ by 2021, number of mobile SIM in country is around half of the population. The use of information technology is flourishing for the knowledge management of adaptation tools and technologies in agriculture. Growing interest on climate change adaptive agriculture among the farmers and easy availability of mobile phones and network service created an opportunity for information sharing on sustainable agriculture and dissemination. However, because of language and tech-literacy barriers, the mobile device, in some instances, still remained an unfamiliar channel for accessing and sharing the information. Development of the digital content requires a complex process because of regulation and technological limitation. Apart from mobile phone SMS, IVR, OBD and Call centers community is also using Facebook and other Apps. Oxfam in Bangladesh has been implemented the project mAgri to develop digital content on 23 crops and farmers are being benefited with the support. Currently Oxfam and Monash University is implementing an action research namely ‘Participatory Research and Ownership with Technology, Information and Changes’ in two fragile ecosystems of Bangladesh. Two hundred female farmers from costal and sandy river bank are using mobile phone as the research animator. The action research has been conducted in two villages along with another two control village for the comparison. Understanding the information ecology is an essential component in designing an ICT intervention for farmers. Farmers have interest on seeds, irrigation and market price mostly. Because of climate-induced migration and economic migration there is feminization in agriculture; female farmers can be a targeted stakeholder of designing ICT potential for adaptive agriculture.

Speakers
avatar for Tapas Chakraborty

Tapas Chakraborty

ICT and Development Coordinator, Oxfam
Working in the development field for the last 18 years. Committed to bring synergy between the development intervention and action research in Bangladesh and closely working with academic and private sector. Currently managing an action research on ICT potential to agriculture fo... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.01

11:45

Customer-Centric Digital Financial Services
Limited Capacity seats available

The talk will focus on how digital financial services need to and can become customer-centric especially for low-income customer segments.



It will draw from Dalberg's extensive work around these themes with clients and will focus on a) User-centered product and service design for digital financial services b) Embedding a customer-centric culture in financial services organizations and d) Thinking about consumer protection for DFS especially for low-income customers.



The presentation will conclude with tangible ways in which the financial inclusion ecosystem can promote greater customer centricity and protection.

Speakers
avatar for Nirat Bhatnagar

Nirat Bhatnagar

Associate Partner, Dalberg
Nirat Bhatnagar is an Associate Partner with Dalberg and leads the New Delhi office. He brings 13 years of multidisciplinary experience in strategy consulting, human-centered design, & entrepreneurship for social impact. | | | | At Dalberg, he leads projects in Financial I... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.04

11:45

Digitized climate and environment-smart lending: A case study
Limited Capacity seats available

Globally, more than 1 Billion (Bn) family farming members work in agriculture on an estimated 475 million smallholder farms, while more than 2 Bn people directly depend on agriculture for their livelihood. Furthermore, 80% of global food supply is produced by such farms, being prone to adverse climate and market impacts and often unsustainably managing the ecosystems they depend on. Estimates project that global food production will need to increase by 70% till 2050 to feed a growing world. While yearly financing requirements for smallholder agricultural production are at USD 500 Bn p.a., only an estimated USD 20 Bn are met.



But MFIs and agro input providers (often providing financing) lack the necessary capacity to handle agricultural risks efficiently and effectively and hence are reluctant to develop this market to a greater extent. While these actors are interested in serving the largely untapped market, and rural advisory service providers have started to foster an emerging smallholder digital footprint, only limited partnerships can be observed. Easy to use and introduce as well as customizable solutions to promote sustainable smallholder development are hence restricted. Furthermore, the complexity of data management, especially regarding climate and ecosystem data, regularly surpasses the abilities of the majority of an estimated 10k+ MFIs and much more small and medium agro input providers operating worldwide.



Yet, these institutions have established distribution channels and installed infrastructure available to promote smallholder development and as examples show (see www.unepmeba.org) can be engaged in autonomously and digitally promoting ecosystem-friendly and climate-smart financing.



The presentation will lay out key components for successful scaling-up of such initiatives, including available data sources and partnership characteristics, and provide a vision for further development.

Speakers
avatar for Christoph Jungfleisch

Christoph Jungfleisch

CEO and Co-founder, YAPU solutions GmbH
Christoph has built a career around promoting scalable green finance. He held various positions in SME and smallholder finance with ProCredit Holding, Frankfurt School of Finance & Management and as independent consultant. He has co-founded YAPU solutions, a software provider of... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.05

11:45

Bring the infrastructure and plan for impact - Prep for next rapid deployment
In emergencies or low-resource setting, there are significant challenges to deploying ICT solutions: connectivity to the internet is poor, digital devices are difficult to keep charged, and general ICT infrastructure is unable to support a new solution either technically or in terms of human resources. To address this barrier, VecnaCares developed Clinipak, a solar powered portable server, Wi-Fi hub and power management system. CliniPAK instantly deploys an ICT infrastructure. CliniPAK supports any installed software and syncs wi-fi enabled data collection devices on a local access network using an internal wi-fi connection, enabling real-time data collection, management, and analysis using the software of your choice. Data collected on each device is available on all devices in real-time and syncs to a cloud-based master index for integration. Participants will see a portable server set-up in real time and deployed with DHIS2 software. Participants will be able to access the DHIS2 instance using distributed tablets or on their own Wi-Fi enabled device.

The session will also cover associated resources needed, considerations to be addressed when choosing a technology for data management, and plans for future use and integration to improve data-driven decisions.

Speakers
avatar for Gillian Javetski

Gillian Javetski

Director of Partnerships, Vecna Cares Charitable Trust
Gillian is the Director of Partnerships at Vecna Cares, a technology organization that designs and deploys hardware, software, and implementation solutions to create measurable impact. Gillian has built her career working for organizations that build impactful technology for low... Read More →
avatar for Emily Taylor

Emily Taylor

Director of Communications, Vecna Cares
I wear many hats at Vecna Cares, a non profit company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. We design and deploy information management and technology solutions to create measureable impact, helping people in low resource settings live healthier and better lives. We build systems t... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.02

11:45

e-Voucher and Livelihood System
Limited Capacity seats available

E-Voucher System: Is a system that uses the Electronic Card and Point of Sales machine as a payment method in the supermarket instead of the Cash money. The card is charged with money at the beginning of the month through an online web portal we can view all the transaction that the beneficiaries online through the portal, the portal also has many powerful report that is used by the finance, project staff and the M&E staff.

Livelihood System: It is an online portal that enable the Interns to register all their information online through a web application. The system will automatically score the beneficiaries based on a predefined criteria and will provide the wining list arranged in order to the highest score. The system also provides an interface for the Employers to register their information and their request the candidates that they need, the system will automatically match the winning candidates with the employers. After the candidates are hired the system provide an attendance system where the candidates register their daily working hours through a POS machine and at the end of the month it will issue the salary slip of each intern. The system also have a very powerful report.

Speakers
avatar for Sameh Abed Rabbo

Sameh Abed Rabbo

IT Manager, Catholic Relief Services
Sameh Abed Rabbo I am currently working as an IT manager for Catholic Relief Services (CRS) for Palestine Country Program, I have over 13 years of IT experience and during my work in CRS I was involved in many ICT4D project that help the Staff to implement the project activities... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.03

11:45

Skill building at scale
Limited Capacity seats available

Anudip Foundation, building on a decade of empowering rural youth for professional livelihoods in the digital economy, is harnessing technology to dramatically increase training capacity and social impact with minimal expense growth.

This talk would delve into the fast paced evolving skill building ecosystem in India and associated challenges. As a tech-driven social enterprise, Anudip is deeply invested in developing disrupting learning models for India’s marginalized and at-risk populations.

Additionally, as India embraces Digital India with shifting focus towards new learnings, Anudip seeks to pioneer New age Digital skills for the youth, to make them ready for the next wave beyond BPO era.

Speakers
avatar for Prasenjit Kundu

Prasenjit Kundu

Executive Director, Anudip Foundation
Prasenjit Kundu holds a BTech degree in Mechanical Engineering from IIT Kharagpur and a MBA from IIM Calcutta. | | | | He is an entrepreneurial leader with a track record of over two decades with Fortune 100 and Indian Global ICT players. He has built a global IT solution... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
G.06

11:45

Talking Books + android for audio knowledge in rural communities
Limited Capacity seats available

Since 2007, Literacy Bridge has worked with local and international partners (e.g. AGRA, CARE, and UNICEF) to create and deliver audio content on agriculture, health, and gender issues for hundreds of thousands of rural farmers and their families using “Talking Book” audio devices. The audio content comes in the form of interviews with local experts, peer endorsements, songs, and dramas.

Talking Books are battery-operated, durable, low-cost, and simple for people to operate without any formal education. Since few communities using them have Internet connectivity, the Talking Books are updated over USB -- with laptops, until now.

This year, Literacy Bridge has launched an Android app to update Talking Books and collect user feedback and usage statistics. When 3G or WIFI is available, the app uploads this feedback and data to the cloud for immediate analysis and reporting. This influences operational adjustments and future content production.

Using Android provides an opportunity for more local partners and entrepreneurs to update Talking Books and send back usage data and feedback.

In this presentation, we will demonstrate the Talking Book, its Audio Content Management System, and the Android app. We will also discuss finding the right blend of technology for the target audience.

Too often, ICT4D practitioners make technology decisions based on penetration rates at a national level. In contrast, this approach matches the right technology for each context: simple and durable technology at the household level, but smartphones at the agent level. In doing so, it also addresses SDGs 5 and 10 (gender and income inequalities).

SDG 5 focuses on gender equality and using ICT to promote the empowerment of women; but technology often widens the inequality gap. In low-to-middle income countries a woman is 21% less likely to own a mobile phone than a man. Given that women already have less access to services such as agriculture extension, the right technology choice is critical to ensure the gender inequality gap gets smaller, not larger.

Speakers
avatar for Cliff Schmidt

Cliff Schmidt

Founder & Executive Director, Literacy Bridge
Cliff founded Literacy Bridge in 2007 to make agriculture and health knowledge accessible to people without literacy skills in remote rural areas. He created an audio-based device called the "Talking Book", which led to a fellowship award presented by Bill Gates and a Clinton Glo... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.01

11:45

YALI and MEL: An open source approach to adaptive management
Limited Capacity seats available

Much time and effort goes into collecting indicator data to monitor and evaluate development programming. However, much of this assessment and learning takes place after a project is already completed -- and lives in PDF reports and logframes.

The urgency of the 2030 Agenda demands a more adaptive and agile approach to monitoring, evaluation, and learning (MEL) -- and the right tools and technologies can help.

In this presentation, DG will share good practices and lessons learned when applying AdaptMIS -- DG's flexible, scalable MEL platform -- for the Young African Leadership Initiative (YALI). In particular, we will cover:
  • How Digital Development Principles shaped the design of a lightweight, modular system that facilitates learning, improves decision-making processes, and enhances programming effectiveness
  • How bringing together GIS, visualizations, and results data can support adaptive, real-time management of innovative programming
  • The importance of the constituent feedback loop during platform development -- and in platform M&E functions

About the case study: The Young African Leadership Initiative (YALI) is investing in the next generation of African leaders by connecting young African leaders with one another and committing substantial US-based resources to enhance their leadership skills and bolster entrepreneurship. Funded by The MasterCard Foundation (MCF), and implemented in partnership with Social Impact (SI), the AdaptMIS platform will facilitate learning, improve decision-making processes, and enhance the effectiveness of YALI programming.

Speakers
avatar for Paige Kirby

Paige Kirby

Senior Engagement and Partnerships Associate, Development Gateway
Paige drives innovation work around the SDGs, leads strategic communications, and supports partnership development at Development Gateway. She works with development organizations and country governments to support the use of data and technology in decision-making. Paige has supp... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.02

11:45

A digital strategy to boost quality of care in African rural clinics
Limited Capacity seats available

The adherence of healthcare workers to clinical algorithms is key to ensure patients receive the life-saving interventions they need. However, improving the performance of healthcare workers in developing country settings has proven for decades to be a challenging problem.

The Integrated e-Diagnostic Approach (IeDA, http://ieda-project.org/) was developed to significantly improve the performance of healthcare workers in using national guidelines for the management of sick children. The intervention is currently implemented in 270+ clinics in Burkina Faso and has been used by over 1,800 healthcare workers to perform more than 900,000 consultations in the last 2 and half years, with an overall use of the tool in 80% of the consultations.

IeDA provides healthcare workers a mobile application that walks them through the national guideline in each consultation (based on WHO’s Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses), helping them adhere to the protocol and record the data which feeds into the algorithm providing the final classification and treatment. In addition, healthcare workers have written and media aids to help them identify signs and communicate complex concepts to the caretakers. Data is transmitted to central servers and to the national health management information system (DHIS2), and monthly reports are sent to regional and district medical teams. The impact of the strategy is being evaluated through a randomized clinical trial, and preliminary data is showing promising results.

Currently the team is focused on (i) continuing to improve the use experience, (ii) increasing the use of data by district teams and (iii) scaling up a e-training module for continuous learning and feedback on clinical skills.

During the session the different aspects of the approach will be presented, with special emphasis on the challenges related to uptake by healthcare workers and roll out of the mobile tool at scale in a rural setting.

Speakers
avatar for Thierry Agagliate

Thierry Agagliate

Head of innovation unit, Fondation Terre des hommes
Thierry Agagliate is responsible of Terre des hommes Lausanne innovation unit – www.tdh.ch. Thierry has led over the last 20 years in Asia, Europa and Africa multiple initiatives investing both on social innovation and on the potential of ICT4D to boost quality in service deliv... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.04

11:45

Achieving health outcomes through community engagement
Limited Capacity seats available

Achieving health outcomes especially for the most marginalised is often challenging in developing and middle income countries for a number of reasons. Our experience in using technology to standardise processes and protocols (sometimes changing them entirely) to focus on the “customer experience” as well the desired outcomes, shows that improved engagement with service providers can lead to better results

This panel presents 3 specific programmes where different technology solutions have been implemented leading to better engagement and improved results.



  1. D-tree’s decision support solutions enable citizens and health workers to make better decisions, seek support and provide feedback.



  2. Everwell has used phone-based monitoring to improve TB adherence in India



  3. Swasti’s community engagement mobile application is allowing facilitation of services and follow-up for 100,000 people



The specific questions we address:



  1. What process or protocol was changed and how was technology and enabler?



  2. What community level results have been achieved and whether the same could have been done without using technology?



  3. What have been key challenges and lessons?



Speakers
avatar for Shama Karkal

Shama Karkal

Director, Swasti
Shama is a passionate social development professional and has worked closely with urban and rural communities in India on health and social development for 19 years. She has lead and been a member of multidisciplinary teams working on integrated solutions. Shama has specific expe... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.06

11:45

Mapping the data – An interactive map of HIV data sources, users, and elements
Limited Capacity seats available

The Kuunika Project – Data for Action! seeks to improve information available to decision-makers at all levels of the health system. The project focuses on improving the supply of high-quality, routine health information and stimulating demand for and use of empirical data for more informed decisions. The ultimate goal is better use of key information to improve HIV and health outcomes.

The project team conducted a systematic analysis of key data users and decision points for strengthening routine use of information to improve HIV and health outcomes in Malawi. Many countries lack a comprehensive inventory of available data, primary users, and systems (both paper and electronic). In Malawi, this limited the ability of the Kuunika Project planners to assess gaps, bottlenecks, and hone in on people and processes where health system investments will yield the greatest return. Further, critical decision points for the HIV response and data needed to support these decisions had not been previously, systematically documented.

The team established a catalogue and relational database for data elements, systems, users, and decisions made using HIV related data. They will also validate assumptions regarding data flow and document how information is typically used to make critical decisions in the HIV response. This interactive workshop will allow participants to explore the map that was created as a result of this analysis and identify critical information gaps and bottlenecks to be used in creating data-driven strategic plans for digital health systems.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Fletcher

Andrea Fletcher

Lead Data Strategist, Cooper/Smith
Prior to joining Cooper/Smith I held a variety of roles at Dimagi, a social enterprise that develops last mile solutions, where I deployed mobile health projects around the world. These projects ranged from small-scale pilots to Ministry of Health-backed national implementations... Read More →
avatar for Tyler Smith

Tyler Smith

Co-Founder, Techical Director, Cooper/Smith
Health economist with deep interest in use of routine data, advanced (yet intuitive) tools, building country-level analytic capacity, and forging technical partnerships to maximize the impact of health and development programs. | Talk to me about data access, streamlining data... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
2.01

11:45

Scaling up health insurance using low cost technology
Limited Capacity seats available

The health system in Cameroon faces significant challenges of limited resources, poor access, inequity and poor quality of care. Similar to a number of other low and middle income countries Cameroonian government is moving towards adopting the goal of Universal Health Coverage with health insurance as the preferred approach. With a significant history of mutual health organizations in the country, Cameroon has had mixed experiences with insurance schemes catering to low income populations. A key reason for some of the failures has been the lack of professional insurance systems making schemes inefficient, non-transparent and prone to fraud. In such an environment church based Bamenda Ecclesiastical Provincial Health Assistance (BEPHA) schemes have undertaken restructuring and scaled up using Insurance Management Information System (IMIS) as the backbone of its operations. Currently operating with over 35000 insured individuals and over 120 health facilities, BEPHA is able to efficiently operate its schemes and is rapidly scaling up its operations by using mobile phones to undertake enrolment, renewal, feedback, client enquiry and claims management.

The Insurance Management Information System (IMIS) developed under a Swiss – Tanzanian cooperation project in Tanzania was provided to BEPHA free of cost by the Swiss Development Corporation. Since its transfer the system has been implemented in three countries and has a community developed around it which aims at further enhancing the system and making it available to all its users. This has allowed BEPHA to access an advanced insurance information system at low cost. The use of android phones and close adaptation of the system to paper forms has allowed for easy training and easy take up of the technology by the users and will further help with the scale up of the schemes.

Speakers
avatar for GEORGE ATOHMBOM YUH

GEORGE ATOHMBOM YUH

Director of Operations and Finance, Bamenda Ecclesiastical Province Health Assistance (BEPHA)
George is the Director of Operations and Finance of the Bamenda Ecclesiastical Provincial Health Assistance Coordination team. For past 5 years he has provided technical backstopping to 4 health insurance schemes of the Catholic Church in North and South West Cameroon towards imp... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
1.05

11:45

An ecosystem approach to financial inclusion through digitization of payments
Limited Capacity seats available

Presenting the results of a research and subsequent activities to increase the use of digital payments at the last mile. The research was conducted with low-income customers and merchants to assess the awareness and satisfaction levels, and to identify the barriers to usage, simultaneously identifying incentives for both customers and merchants. The findings have been combined to develop an ecosystem approach to work on the key aspects in a synchronized manner. 


Speakers
avatar for MUKESH SADANA

MUKESH SADANA

Digital Development Advisor, USAID
Mukesh Sadana is a Digital Development Advisor with USAID/India where he is helping to integrate digital technology and data-driven approaches into mission programming and co-managing a project to increase the use of digital payments among low income populations. He has over 18 years of work experience in FMCG, banking, retailing and consulting. Mukesh has worked extensively across Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Indonesia, Philippines, Nepal, Vietnam, Malawi, and Papua New Guinea on a wide variety of... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
2.02

11:45

Enterprise GIS development for Catholic communities
Limited Capacity seats available

A geographic perspective helps us to make informed, respectful, and sustainable planning decisions in a way that blends values and scientific information. GoodLands’ Catholic Geographic System provides the means for understanding Catholic communities’ location, a mechanism for managing this information, and a hub to leverage this information for the benefit of many. Our development of a location platform and application of a geodesign framework allows us to accomplish these goals as we work with Catholic communities to initiate positive change and local partnerships.

We partnered with Esri, the leaders in Geospatial technologies, to develop the first phase of our Catholic Community Enterprise GIS System, which enables data sharing among users if desired in a manner that is respectful of privacy and security needs. Catholic NGOs, religious orders, and dioceses will have access to the relevant catholic data resources they need to effectively plan. Through that process we developed the largest geodatabase of global catholic information. We are currently providing GIS and planning support for telecommunications strategies to share Pope Francis’ message of tenderness to Africa.

Speakers
avatar for Molly Burhans

Molly Burhans

Executive Director, GoodLands
Molly Burhans is the founder of GoodLands. She lead GoodLands’ Enterprise GIS team to make the first global digital maps of the Catholic Church and lay the foundation for a global Catholic spatial data infrastructure. She is involved with the Vatican Youth Symposium, work invol... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
2.05

11:45

Transinformation for transformation
Limited Capacity seats available

This presentation will focus on the innovative work that PCI is doing in 3 countries (Ethiopia, Tanzania and Guatemala) across multiple sectors (eg, urban renewal including health, WASH, and shelter; and food, nutrition and livelihood security) to effectively combine locally sourced, traditional methods of information and communication with high tech, mobile and/or satellite sourced data and means of transmitting and presenting that data, for optimal uptake and decision making by local actors. AfriScout (Ethiopia and Tanzania) is an innovative approach, including mobile phone application, to blending satellite generated data with indigenous knowledge and information sharing mechanisms in order to help pastoralists effectively pinpoint pasture and water in the face of climate change using real time maps, with significant results in terms of livestock mortality and family resiliency. D-RISK is a decision support system that involves layering primary and secondary data, including participant-generated information, for complete mapping and optimal planning and empowered decision making for risk mitigation and resource management in high risk urban (Guatemala) as well as rural (Ethiopia) areas. Outcomes ranging from health and nutrition to household income and neighborhood renewal will be shared, as well as lessons learned and recommendations for how best to blend indigenous information and practices with ICT for optimal, sustainable impact.

Speakers
avatar for Janine Schooley

Janine Schooley

Senior Vice President Programs, Project Concern International
Ms. Schooley has served as the senior-most technical and programs staff at PCI since 2000. As Senior Vice President for Programs at PCI, she ensures integrated, quality programming for sustainable impact across PCI’s global portfolio. Since 2007 she has been on faculty at the M... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 12:25
2.03

11:45

The Big Discussions: Disaster Management, Data-driven Adaptation & Strategy
Limited Capacity seats available

Moderators
avatar for Isaac Kwamy

Isaac Kwamy

Director, Global Programs, Humanitarian Disaster Management, NetHope
Isaac is presently the Global Programs Director of Humanitarian Operations and Disaster Management for NetHope. Isaac leads NetHope’s Global Humanitarian Operations Programs including Emergency Preparedness, Response & Recovery efforts, Crisis Informatics, Access to Information as Aid and Humanitarian Digital Financial Services (Cash programing). This includes providing leadership, oversight and execution of... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Charles Callanan

Charles Callanan

Country Director, UNOPS
Charles Callanan has over 20 years taking on challenging problems managing projects with up to 179,000 staff. He has a passion for bringing appropriate technology to difficult problems and has led operations spanning 110 countries, delivering over $300m per year. Most recently... Read More →
avatar for Keith Chibafa

Keith Chibafa

Head of Business Development (LMMS), World Vision International
Keith Chibafa joined WV International in 2010 after a career in the private sector. He is responsible for overseeing World Vision International’s (WVI) efforts to collaborate with key local and international entities interested in the implementation and execution of WVI’s Las... Read More →
avatar for Priscilla Chomba-Kinywa

Priscilla Chomba-Kinywa

Global Advisor - Tech & Innovation, DanChurchAid
With 15 years' experience working in the tech and innovation space within large organisations such as WFP and UNICEF, Priscilla now works as DanChurchAid's Global Advisor on all things Tech & Innovation. This includes working with local partners in countries in Africa, Asia and t... Read More →
avatar for Allie Lieber

Allie Lieber

Program Manager, Google
Allison Lieber is a Program Manager on the Google Earth Outreach team, where she leads Google’s efforts to support nonprofits, scientists and other public benefit groups using Google’s mapping tools and technology for public health. Allison has a degree in Economics from Wash... Read More →
avatar for William Martin

William Martin

Technical Advisor Cash and Markets, Catholic Relief Services
Specialist of economic and early recovery in highly challenging contexts, William is responsible for supporting the development and implementation of markets-based and cash transfer programs for CRS’ emergency response around the globe. With more than 8 years of experience, his... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 11:45 - 13:15
Hall 2

12:25

Transition Time
Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:25 - 12:30
HICC

12:30

Artificial intelligence for smart plant protection
Limited Capacity seats available

We believe that artificial intelligence and learning machines can boost human capacities to a new level, supporting people to take smarter decisions and save resources. Agriculture has been a neglected area for this new technology, despite 15-30% of the global yield being lost every year to plant diseases and pests. We think that there is much space for innovation here!

The classification of plant damages is crucial in order to apply effective treatment and prevention measures and to avoid food loss, waste of inputs and economic losses that ultimately even threaten food and nutrition security especially in rural livelihoods. In addition, the inadequate application of high doses of chemical treatments destroys natural resources and harms the health of both producers and consumers. Still, detection of plant diseases is expert knowledge in many areas of the world, where extension is scarce and knowledge is hardly accessible for most of the smallholder farmers, especially women. Despite the governmental endeavours of support, farmers do not have sufficient access to public-sector advisory services tailored to their particular needs. Instead of the necessary quick diagnosis and treatment option advice, smallholder farmers often find – nothing.

ICT solutions can bridge this gap using cutting edge technologies like image recognition and artificial intelligence to assist farmers worldwide in taking informed decisions on their disease management, almost in real time. Big data - translated in accessible formats like e.g. smartphone applications - has the capacity to radically change the way agricultural information is spread and agricultural practices are applied. Millions of people can be supplied with real time, valuable information on occurrence, spread and remedies for plant diseases and pests threatening their harvests. Apart from saving money wasted on ineffective treatments, we can save billions of tons of chemicals starting to use smart technologies in order to take intelligent decisions on our most precious resource: nature.

Speakers
avatar for Simone Strey

Simone Strey

CEO of PEAT, PEAT GmbH
Simone Strey is a co-founder and CEO of PEAT, a deep learning AgTech Start Up founded as a spin-off from the Leibniz University in Hanover. PEAT combines automatic image recognition, big data and agriculture to answer one question: “Are my plants doing good?” The startup deve... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
G.02

12:30

CRS Haiti program adoption of technology
Limited Capacity seats available

Our Presentation will demonstrate through two cases studies how you can integrate technology in a M&E information system.
You will see how to drive the implementation of the technplogy through an ICT4D staff with the collaboration of ICT and M&E.
During the lessons learned part, you will be able to understand some common issue and the way to solve it. The exchange will allow participant to ask some question regarded to thier own issiue if they use the same technology with us.
 
 
 
 

Speakers
avatar for Sony Belizaire

Sony Belizaire

ICT4D Manager, Catholic Relief Services
Teach GIS in two Universities in Haiti, I was a presenter in 2015 UC in San Diego and in 2013 mEducation Alliance international in Washington DC. I work for CRS-Haiti since 7 years. My current position is ICT4D Manager with responsability to support ICT4D specialist, M&E Speci... Read More →
avatar for Fredson Joseph

Fredson Joseph

MEAL/ICT4D Officer, Catholic Relief Services
Hi there, my name Fredson Joseph, I have bachelor in Software engineering and I work for CRS for almost 6 years in the field of ICT4D/MEAL.



Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
G.01

12:30

Creating an online marketplace and catalyzing community
Limited Capacity seats available

Human capacity is a critical component of delivering financial services, yet many financial institutions, particularly those targeting the poor in developing countries, consistently struggle to develop and manage their human capital. This is important as an estimated 2 billion working-age adults – more than half of the world’s total adult population – do not have an account at a formal financial institution.

In response to the opportunity to look at new applications of technology to catalyze change in the field of financial inclusion, CGAP has launched a project called Gateway Academy, an innovative learning project offering both on-line and blended courses and cultivating communities of practice focused on financial inclusion in sub-Saharan Africa. Gateway Academy is working with training providers, financial service providers, and e-learning experts to generate high quality course content, build communities of practice, and conduct on-going research to understand user needs.

Gateway Academy is facilitating the development of inclusive and sustainable markets for virtual and blended training around financial inclusion. A critical part of this work is creating an online marketplace for that training. Our presentation will include a brief demonstration of the online marketplace and share what have learned through its design and user input. We will highlight how our approach is guided by principles for digital development and the opportunities and challenges they present.

Our presentation will focus on the following principles as they apply to developing this platform, community and market:
• Design with the user
• Understand the existing ecosystem
• Design for scal
• Build for sustainability
• Be collaborative

As part of our sustainability approach is to open this platform to other sectors and geographical areas, we are eager to hear from other attendees about its potential utility for them.

Speakers
avatar for Kristy Amacker

Kristy Amacker

Senior Web Strategist - Gateway Academy, World Bank/CGAP
Kristy Amacker is a senior web strategist with CGAP’s Gateway Academy. CGAP is a global partnership of 34 leading organizations that seek to advance financial inclusion and is housed at the World Bank. Kristy has also worked with USAID on a range of online knowledge management... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
G.04

12:30

From cash to digital: bulk payments in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

In Uganda, Vital Wave teamed with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and USAID to design and pilot a digital payments proof-of-concept system for bulk payments. This work involved extensive coordination of diverse stakeholders and substantial capacity-building efforts among MNOs, banks, aggregators, and USAID partner organizations. Specifically, Vital Wave created a Uganda program office to coordinate and create efficiencies across all stakeholder activities, worked with aggregators to expand their bulk payments capacity, assessed and improved transaction pricing strategies, strengthened MNO operations. The engagement left digital payment tools and processes in the hands of NGOs and private-sector players in the Ugandan mobile money industry. The ecosystem is now growing organically but challenges remain in scaling these solutions to rural areas. 

This presentation will cover the accomplishments, lessons learned, and challenges of implementing bulk payments and DFS in urban and rural areas. 

Speakers
avatar for Leah Gatt

Leah Gatt

Director of Research, Vital Wave
Leah brings years of experience in research, analysis, and on-the-ground implementation, particularly in digital financial services. At Vital Wave, Ms. Gatt supports the development of policies and best practices across projects; provides stakeholder management with MNOs, technol... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
G.05

12:30

Delivering your learning content in a disconnected world
Limited Capacity seats available

According to Clayton R. Wright (International Education Consultant, Canada), there are 5 key barriers to educational technology adoption in the developing world: electrical power, Internet connectivity, training and professional development, valuing of teachers, and sustainability. The constant advance of technology creates endless possibilities for education, but when you work in the developing world, implementation and sustainability are challenging to achieve.

As an instructional designer, I have seen the pitfalls that befall an agency when they try to embrace the new technologies but really do not understand them. This session aims to help you choose the best platform so that your implementation is successful and sustainable. We will do this by comparing and contrasting LRS, LMS, CMS, and ADB platforms addressing:
• Digital learning terminology
• Learning in the digital age
• Data collection and offline access
• Content delivery and management

When you complete this session you will have a roadmap for selecting the best platform for delivering your learning content.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Moats

Laura Moats

Instructional Designer, eLearning MTO
Laura Moats helps clients produce and deliver training and documentation using her 20+ years of experience as an instructional designer, developer, technical writer, and translation manager. Laura has worked across many disciplines from healthcare, to nano-technology, to major re... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.03

12:30

Harnessing data management and visualization for improved service delivery
Limited Capacity filling up

This presentation will demonstrate that systematic, intentional, and creative uses of project data improves enumerator efficiency, informs project decision making, and provides useful insights for team management. This is based on CRS’ experience with the first and second phase of The Learning and Engaging All in Primary School (LEAPS I/II), a USDA-funded project as part of the McGovern-Dole (MGD) International Food for Education (FFE) and Child Nutrition Program.

During the first phase of LEAPS, the project suffered from a glut of data and a dearth of information. With 440 data points being collected across 17 different data collection tools from over 300 locations every month, the project had more than enough data yet lacked the systems and tools to extract meaningful information from the data. Consequently, the project underwent an overhaul of its M&E system in order to establish a clearer distinction between ‘nice-to-know’ and ‘need-to-know’ data. This reduced enumerator workload; improved the timeliness of data; and established processes for easily extracting meaningful information for donor reporting.

The project has since combined project data with GIS data. This permits the project to view of data on commodity levels, sanitation infrastructure, project risk factors, and other key pieces of information across the entire project area at a glance, thereby informing management decisions. For example, visualizing school meal consumption patterns enables the project to more efficiently deploy follow up visits to the schools which are struggling.

LEAPS II aims to go beyond these steps to leverage ICT4D. Soon enumerators will have access to personalized reports on their tablets that allow them to view the performance of their schools, allowing them to identify patterns in school needs. Simultaneously, enumerator managers will be able to view reports on the amount of time enumerators take to collect data, as well as where and how often schools are visited. This is expected to have enormous benefits from both a managerial as well as quality assurance standpoint.

Speakers
avatar for John Mulqueen

John Mulqueen

MEAL Manager, Catholic Relief Services
John holds a BA in Economics from the Catholic University of America and an MA in International Political Economy and Development from Fordham University. Throughout his career he has leveraged data driven solutions in a variety of positions with organizations including the Peace... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.02

12:30

Offline e-cash solutions
Limited Capacity seats available

Having worked with a number of NGO's delivering secure off-line e-cash solutions in over 20 countries over the past 2 years, this demonstration covers RedRose's fully integrated solution to running entire programs including: beneficiary management, program management for any cash modality, and a robust M&E platform including a data analytics tool.

Speakers
avatar for Brian Healy

Brian Healy

Business Development, RedRose
RedRose is a technology company established to enable NGOs to revolutionise the way they deliver Cash Based Interventions (CBI’s) globally. RedRose has developed the RedRose ONEsolution to help NGOs improve operational efficiency and ensure programs remain relevant and fit for... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.01

12:30

Capturing leprosy related disability data using both HIS & TIS
Limited Capacity seats available

Swiss Emmaus Leprosy Relief Work India (SEI) is a development organisation providing both social & medical rehabilitation for people affected by leprosy. SEI's core competence is managing tertiary leprosy hospitals where reconstructive surgeries and management of reaction cases are undertaken. Patient information at the hospital is captured in the Hospital Information System (HIS). Additionally, a field based intervention was implemented with an objective to diagnose and treat early cases of leprosy in order to prevent disability. Information from 4 sources that diagnoses early cases of leprosy is captured from the field by the Divisional Coordinators (DC's) in the tablet information system (TIS) along with their socio-demographic, medical, and disability related information. Both the HIS and TIS to-gather form a vital tool that provides comprehensive patient information and facilitates in preventing leprosy related disability.

Speakers
avatar for John Kurian George

John Kurian George

Chief Executive, Swiss Emmaus Leprosy Relief Work India
I’ve been in a progressive leadership position for over the last decade. Currently I’m the CEO for Swiss Emmaus Leprosy Relief Work India. I have close to 24 years of professional experience in implementing public health programs that includes STI/HIV/AIDS, Neonatal health, L... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
2.01

12:30

Elephants in the room: Challenges in scaling up RMNCH digital innovations
Limited Capacity filling up

Over the last decade, the number of digital health solutions has exploded, changing the way we think about delivering healthcare services.  Earlier, digital solutions tended to be innovative and disruptive in their approach, but were not often built to scale and become sustainable. Now, nearly a decade since the first digital health programs started up, digital solutions are becoming a critical element of all health systems programs; however, they continue to grapple with scale. The Johns Hopkins Global mHealth Initiative has worked in close partnership with digital health innovators around the world to support monitoring, measurement and scaling up of the programs.

What does it take for a digital health intervention to scale successfully? In this session, we discuss some common challenges and best practices in scaling-up based on experience gathered through nearly a decade of close engagement with a diverse group of digital health innovations targeting improvements in reproductive, maternal and child health.  Additionally, we present resources developed by global agencies to support innovators in measuring the progress of, and in scaling up digital health solutions. 


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Dr. Smisha Agarwal

Associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Dr. Agarwal is an Associate in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Global mHealth Initiative (JHU-GmI). She is a population health scientist with expertise in monitoring and evaluation of large scale... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.04

12:30

The data intelligence behind India’s only national government scheme that surpassed 30% of its target
Limited Capacity seats available

Nearly half of India's households don't have access to clean cooking fuel. Instead, they rely on firewood, coal, dung, and other unclean fuel sources for cooking - the equivalent to smoking 400 cigarettes an hour, and lead to 500,000 deaths per year in India. To combat this problem, the Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MoPNG) launched its flagship scheme — the Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana — which aims to provide free LPG (liquified petroleum gas) connections to 50 million women under the poverty line by 2019. With the help of SocialCops, the MoPNG used data intelligence to carry out the scheme effectively. We focused on three key aspects of the scheme: opening new LPG distribution centers in places with the most impact, tracking the LPG application process, and ensuring that new LPG connections were installed effectively and safely.



Ujjwala is hailed as the most efficient scheme executed by Govt of India, and 2 crore connections have been installed in under a year - being the only govt. scheme to surpass its targets. Find out how, in this talk where we'll take you behind the scenes on how a leader ran one of the most complex schemes in the country effectively using data intelligence and the latest geospatial analytics.

Speakers
avatar for Prukalpa Sankar

Prukalpa Sankar

Co-Founder, Socialcops
Prukalpa is the co-founder of SocialCops, a data intelligence company that empowers organizations to make tough decisions and solve some of the world’s most critical problems using data and technology. Their platform brings the entire decision-making process to one place — from collecting primary data and accessing secondary data to merging internal data and visualizing data via easy-to-use dashboards. SocialCops works with over 150 organizations in more than seven countries, on problems as diverse as driving rapid village development, tracking national welfare schemes, and optimizing marketing campaign locations. Their work spans different sectors with partners such as the Gates Foundation, Tata Trusts, United Nations, Government of India, Unilever and Frost... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.06

12:30

Use of mHealth platform for improving maternal and child health in Uganda
Limited Capacity seats available

Introduction: The project, mHealth mobile platform, has been used as a useful innovation in capturing, relaying and using data for one of the WV project model called timed targeted Counseling.

Method: 896 community health workers were trained and they have been able to contribute in improving maternal and child health indicators in communities where the application was implemented. The application was implemented jointly with the mobile service provider, CHWs, the district health authorities and World Vision. The MoH and district staff were trained to generate the data for quality monitoring and use for decision making. Pre and post intervention evaluation was conducted to assess the impact on key maternal and child health indicators. LiST mathematical model was used to estimate the contribution in reducing infant mortality rate and maternal mortality ratio.

Result: The apparatus allowed the CHWs to register and follow up pregnant women, lactating mothers and children and be able to transfer the data on a monthly basis. Moreover, the phone has been able to provide key messages for each visits and remind about due visits. The study finding showed educated and those experienced with cellphone has been able to use better. The use of mobile technology enabled mothers and children to access health care services and utilize them in a timely manner. CHWs used the phones to coordinate with the health facilities for emergency referrals. This has contributed to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with maternal and child health and nutrition and enhance the well-being of children.

Conclusion and recommendation: this application can be applied in similar developing countries contexts. New ICT technologies are needed to address the challenges observed in resource limited settings like the study area. These adaptations needed are in areas of improving mobile coverage for CHWs serving remote communities, reducing subscription fee, access to alternative electric power for mobile charging and mobile phone functioning problems.

Speakers
avatar for Sisay Sinamo Boltena

Sisay Sinamo Boltena

Senior Technical Advisor, Health and Nutrition, World Vision International
Dr. Sisay has a Master of Public Health degree from University of the Western Cape and a doctorate Degree in Medicine from Addis Ababa University Medical School. He worked in developmental and emergency health and nutrition programming in the past 16 years. He successfully provid... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
1.05

12:30

Refugee.Info - Connectivity and partnerships beyond borders
Limited Capacity seats available

Some say using limited resources, such as a staff of 1, no networking equipment in stock, and starting an internet connectivity project from scratch is taking a long shot, but thanks to partnerships between Mercy Corps, International Rescue Committee, NetHope in Greece, and SOS Children’s Villages in Serbia, it has been possible.

This presentation will reflect the collaboration, work and approach used by Refugee.Info and partners since March 2016 to provide free internet access and access to important information to over 100,000 refugees and migrants located in Greece and Balkans .

Speakers
avatar for Jovan Jelicic

Jovan Jelicic

Refugee.Info - Regional Connectivity Manager, MercyCorps
Regional Connectivity Manager, Europe, in charge of establishing partnerships and sustainability plans for WiFi hot spots, provision of WiFi hot spots in key locations along the Europe migration routes, performing site assessments, networking equipment configuration, installation... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
2.02

12:30

Scaling ICT for community-led sanitation from pilot to government ownership
Limited Capacity seats available

Akros has pioneered national community-based surveillance systems in Zambia and has successfully replicated such systems at scale in surrounding countries. In fact, Akros was the first implementing partner to use mobile-to-web DHIS2 as both a data collection and feedback tool at scale in Zambia. Initially, Akros focused on malaria in Lusaka district, but today, a network of more than 3,000 volunteers across 96 districts and 17,000 villages are reporting on water and sanitation indicators. Targeted actions informed by this system led to access to improved sanitation for an additional two million Zambians and Southern Africa's first district to be declared ""Open Defecation Free.""

The scale and transfer of this ""mHealth"" initiative was only possible through constant communication with government partners from the outset of the process. To complement this process, Akros cultivated the support of traditional leaders (chiefs) by engaging them in analysis of their local data and promote healthy behaviors in their communities. Today, the project is maintained by the Ministry of Local Government and Housing, with technical support from Akros, SNV, and Plan.

This presentation will discuss our approach to community led total sanitation, and strategies for the sustainable scaling of routine data collection initiatives. In particular it will share how we developed a network of data providers and data users, at both the community and central government levels.

Speakers
avatar for Brian O'Donnell

Brian O'Donnell

R&D Team Lead, Akros
Brian O’Donnell is an R&D Team Lead and HIV Informatics Manager with Akros, based in Lusaka, Zambia. He designs and implements mobile-to-web data collection systems, primarily through DHIS2, for HIV prevention, education, and community sanitation surveillance programs in Zambia... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
2.05

12:30

Tackling climate change and global migration flows: Need for collaboration
Limited Capacity seats available

This paper aims to discuss the significance of collaboration, coordination and partnership at various levels in tackling issues pertaining to climate change and global migration flows. Data used in this work are ‘qualitative’ and ‘secondary’ in nature: collected from government publications, books, book chapters, journal articles and Internet resources. Method of data analysis is ‘descriptive’. The Paper concludes that there has been growing cooperation on climate change, environment and human mobility among the humanitarian agencies, most notably within the framework of the Interagency Standing Committee (IASC). The IOM has taken an active role within the IASC process in incorporating climate change on the humanitarian agenda.

Keywords: Interconnections, Climate Change, Environmental Issues, Global Migration Flows, Repercussions, and Socio-Environmental Interactions

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Santosh Kumar Mishra

Dr. Santosh Kumar Mishra

Technical Assistant, Population Education Resource Centre (PERC), Department of Continuing and Adult Education and Extension Work, S. N. D.
I am researcher & demographer employed as Technical Assistant (since August 1987) with the Population Education Resource Centre (PERC), Department of Continuing and Adult Education and Extension Work, S. N. D. T. Women's University (SNDTWU, http://sndt.ac.in) located at Mumbai in... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
2.03

12:30

There’s no app for that: Preparing for a tech implementation
Limited Capacity seats available

Ready to implement a new technology -- trade in the paper for smartphones, start administering surveys via SMS, transition to a new CRM system? Worldwide, social impact organizations are seeking technology solutions to better manage data, measure performance, report to donors, & address inefficiencies in programs/operations.

When it comes to implementing a new tech tool, how do we gauge whether an organization is “ready”? What happens when the technology implementation - inadvertently or advertently - leads to upheaval in the organization’s processes? How can we ensure that technology is a tool underpinning quality delivery, with the focus on impact rather than on the tool itself?

Vera has had the opportunity to work with 180+ such organizations, all of whom sought to improve their efficiency & effectiveness by using technology & data to inform their operations. Several of our partners have grappled with these questions -- some used tech explicitly for M&E, while others found that that the technology happened to bring quality data, accountability, & improved feedback loops with it.

During this session, three Vera partners - FMCH India, Liberty Asia, and Pollinate Energy - will discuss their struggles and triumphs with being “ready” to use technology to advance their work in health, anti-slavery, and energy respectively. Participants will leave with a ‘Readiness Checklist’ that builds on Vera’s experiences helping our partners implement tech systems for the development sector.

Panel: - Vera Solutions builds cloud & mobile technology to help social impact organizations to better track their impact & streamline their operations - FMCH India supports mothers/children in underprivileged Indian communities by providing preventive health/nutrition services at their clinics in Mumbai - Liberty Asia works to prevent human trafficking through legal advocacy, technological interventions, & strategic collaborations with NGOs/corporations in Asia - Pollinate Energy is a social business that provides India's urban poor with renewable energy solutions on payment plans.

Speakers
avatar for Aleksa Krolls

Aleksa Krolls

Director, Support & Innovation, Vera Solutions
Aleksa leads Vera’s Support & Innovation team, which helps organizations to successfully implement/adopt data systems to improve the efficiency & effectiveness of the social sector. Aleksa has led the design, implementation, & rollout of cloud- & mobile-based data systems for M... Read More →
avatar for Piyasree Mukherjee

Piyasree Mukherjee

CEO, Foundation for Mother & Child Health
At the Foundation for Mother and Child Health, all resources are invested towards an innovative community-based nutrition specific intervention. FMCH aims at empowering every mother and her family belonging to a vulnerable community to make the right food choice by providing accu... Read More →
avatar for Frank Nankivell

Frank Nankivell

Program Director, Liberty Asia
Liberty Asia works to prevent human trafficking through legal advocacy, technological interventions, and strategic collaborations with NGOs & corporations in Asia.
avatar for Alexie Seller

Alexie Seller

CEO and Co-founder, Pollinate Energy
Alexie Seller is co-founder and CEO of Pollinate Energy, a not-for-profit social enterprise that brings life-changing products to people who need them most, in India’s city slums. Previously, she held positions as a Project Engineer at Australia's Nuclear Science and Technology... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 12:30 - 13:15
2.04

13:15

Lunch
Tuesday May 16, 2017 13:15 - 14:15
Hall 4

14:15

Bringing markets to smallholder farmers
Limited Capacity seats available

 In Zambia there are 1,305,783 rural farmers with increasing mobile phone access, but zero accessible services connecting them to markets.Lima Links offers agricultural services to smallholder farmers via technology platforms.My presentation focuses on how Lima Links is bringing markets to smallholder farmers through big data and  dynamic information services. 

Speakers
avatar for Richard Yona

Richard Yona

Market Linkage & Operations Manager, Limalinks Ltd
The speaker is a Zambian who posses MBA from Cavendish Zambia University, Diploma in Agriculture from a University College Natural Resources Development College and various professional certificates in agriculture. Professional specialiazation courses attended include Crops techn... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.02

14:15

Digital M&E: building a global baseline with complex indicators
Limited Capacity filling up

We collected data from about 7000 small-scale farmers in 12 countries using the World Bank's tool Survey Solutions, automated the data Analysis and created an online database that is easy to use for non-quantitative people running the programme on which the data is based. The innovation in this approach is the speedy connection between data collection, analysis and feedback to the data users.

The German Development Cooperation (GIZ) is running a programme called “Green Innovation Centres for the Agriculture and Food Sector” on behalf of Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development. The innovation centres are designed to drive rural change in 13 developing countries through innovations in agriculture.

In a baseline study for this programme, we surveyed 7000 smallholder farmers and collected data in Burkina Faso, Benin, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Malawi, Nigeria, Togo, Tunisia and Zambia (12 of the 13 programme countries). Focus group discussions served to put the survey data in context. The goal was to understand the target population with respect to poverty, hunger, agricultural production and marketing and innovations. The baseline data not only serves as a basis for evaluating the programme. On the basis of new data, those running the programme can inform themselves on the needs and innovation potentials of their target groups.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Linda Kleemann

Dr. Linda Kleemann

Consultant, GFA Consulting Group
Expert in quantitative Evaluation, M&E, mobile data collection making real-time feedback to project management and beneficiaries possible. Previously worked for 7 years in research studying impact evaluation in rural development and entrepreneurship, having a PhD in agricultural... Read More →
avatar for Thorsten Schoel

Thorsten Schoel

IT Consultant, GFA B.I.S. GmbH
An anthropologist with a focus on development processes by training, I conducted research with Bedouin in Syria before going into ICT4D. For the past several years I have now been designing and implementing ICT systems for development projects, constantly exploring new technologi... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.03

14:15

Using Agricultural Intelligence & Weather Analytics across the Value Chain
Limited Capacity seats available

Real-time understanding of current, past and future crop growing conditions is critical to food security and commodity analysts, agribusinesses and farmers alike. This is especially true in the face of more demand for food and changing climatic conditions causing increase weather variability.

Learn about cutting edge ag-weather information and insights being made available to organizations across is the agricultural value chain. From small holder farmers receiving precisely targeted, machine generated recommendations and forecasts on feature phones, to global weather analytics supporting sales, marketing and trading decisions. We use our big data agricultural intelligence platform to better inform all aspects of the agricultural value chain turning data into information, and information into insight. These tools enable real-time decisions to be made both at the field level or the global scale.

Speakers
avatar for Stewart Collis

Stewart Collis

CTO, aWhere
Mr. Collis has over 20 years’ experience in agricultural information technology. A graduate of the University of New South Wales, Mr Collis worked at the CGIAR and Texas A&M University before co-founding aWhere. aWhere is a Benefit Corporation focused on using agricultural inte... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.01

14:15

Principles for Digital Development Implementer Toolkit
Limited Capacity seats available

The Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL) was asked to take over stewardship and operationalization of the Principles for Digital Development in 2016. In order to facilitate the operationalization of the Principles to make them useful for the global community, it is critical that actionable, impactful and relevant tools and resources are created.

To date, much of the Principles socialization process has focused on implementers at HQ level and donors. It will be critical to build upon the recommendations of the year-long consulting process to develop tools and guidance with the community that implementers can use, and to also focus on a dedicated effort to embed the Principles firmly where they need to be adopted – in countries.

For all stakeholder groups, the Principles encourage collective, integrated, aggregated action instead of singular, one-off programs in order to build sustainable technology solutions. The Principles have been widely embraced by the digital development community but many are struggling with how to turn them into concrete and simple “go do” steps that all can follow. The community has required that the next phase of development of the Principles be for organizations like DIAL and others to gather, curate, and create – where needed – new guidance for implementers, countries and donors on “how” to implement and institutionalize the Principles in their digital development efforts.

This session will be a soft launch of the implementer toolkit to garner feedback from the digital development community to ensure that it is useful and relevant for them.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Florey

Carolyn Florey

Director, Collective Impact, Digital Impact Alliance
Carolyn is the Director of Collective Impact for the Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL). In this role, she helps coalesce the development community around scaling and increasing the impact and cost effectiveness of digital development investments. Prior to joining the Digital Impact... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.04

14:15

Salesforce to SQL server to ArcGIS Online map: Global projects map
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

In emerging trends, CRS has driven its way in developing ICT tools such as digital monitoring and evaluation of data. Through this CRS seeks to define an information architecture that lets CRS staff use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to provide mapping tools for reporting, monitoring and a wide variety of map production needs. As we seek to improve the automation and quality of mapping both for international and local level, one of our vision is to be able to produce an interactive map for the executives and others that will help us visualize the relationship of different factors and activities carried out by CRS all over the world. With the use of Salesforce, CRS keeps track of current and historical relationships between individuals and institutions, and projects it implements worldwide.

CRS currently uses a suite of products from Esri, relying most heavily on ArcGIS Online. CRS is creating an online, interactive map from datasets that resides in Salesforce in an effort to better understand and manage the information that it needs to carry out its work.

Speakers
avatar for Janeen Kim Cayetano

Janeen Kim Cayetano

Geographic Information Systems Analyst, Catholic Relief Services
Janeen Kim Cayetano is a graduate of BS Geography at the University of the Philippines. She currently works as a GIS Analyst at Catholic Relief Services based in the Philippines providing remote GIS support to CRS programs worldwide. Also serves as a key member of the ICT4D commu... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.05

14:15

Tools for monitoring SDGs
Limited Capacity seats available

Monitoring of SDGs: To ensure that interventions to implement SDGs are on track, and in building local capacity for more responsive and accountable governance.



Achieving the SDGs requires robust monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of frameworks in order to track progress and ensure accountability.



A stable and easy to use M&E system can help governments improve their management and governance processes. The challenge for most governments is in developing local M&E systems that are affordable yet complete.

The disaggregated social, economic and demographic data at sub-national levels derived from M&E system can be leveraged to make critical real or near-time decisions, which will enable making correct choices on allocating resources and interventions for achieving desired outcomes.



Dissemination of SDG data to a larger audience can promote transparency and through this facilitates better decision-making and accountability. It also gives external researchers, professionals, and citizens the opportunities to develop research, policy recommendations, and technological innovations and tools that can directly strengthen local governance.



M&E system will help aggregate SDG outcomes at the national and sub-national levels, compare SDG progress between different geographies and areas of development, and also help in dissemination of data for good.

Speakers
avatar for Arun Kapuria

Arun Kapuria

CEO, iTech Mission Private Limited (iTM)
Technical entrepreneur with over 20 years of broad experience in technology innovations and development sector with an excellent understanding of the overall operations and the implementation of technology projects in human development sector. Extensive experience facilit... Read More →
avatar for Sameer Thapar

Sameer Thapar

Director - Technology, iTechMission
Sameer Thapar (Director - Technology) is an international advisor and expert in the development and implementation of management information systems with data-driven solutions. He has professional skills in project management, system design and development, database design and development, instructional content design, learning and development, capacity building and strategic planning. He also has monitoring, evaluation and data analysis skills for evidence-based decision making and results-based management. He has over 24 years of experience working as a consultant, senior technical advisor, technical manager and senior trainer in the administration and management of development projects, organizational development in international settings, change management and developing technical training programs and plans for working groups. He has been responsible for assisting public institutions in the development of socio-economic information management systems with a deep understanding of UN programme and... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
G.06

14:15

Can digital credit work at scale? Results from 2 experiments in India
Limited Capacity seats available

There is a huge unmet credit need (~$400billion+ per year), particularly in the low income segments in India. Our recent work shows that 3 in 5 Indians borrow using informal means.



Traditional lenders are structurally constrained from fulfilling this need: Inability to lend without collateral, high cost of lending, outmoded underwriting, limited product innovation, are some key reasons.



Macro factors and ecosystem drivers have substantially fueled growth of the inclusive digital lending industry.



As a result three models seem to be emerging – Digital Data Credit Scored Lending, Invoice Discounting, Peer to Peer Lending.



Our work on pilots built on the India stack showed that inclusive digital lending has large potential to scale. We noted positive consumer experience, potential to serve a new segment of low income demographics and lower costs of lending.



However, there are risks in inclusive digital lending that need to be addressed, such as over-lending, suitability of product offerings, and data protection/consent



Change makers can explore a number of opportunities to help realise the potential of responsible inclusive lending such as creating shared standards and practices, enhancing consumer readiness and fostering responsible growth.

Speakers
avatar for Varad Pande

Varad Pande

Partner, Dalberg
Varad is a Partner at Dalberg and leads the Financial Inclusion Practice area. Varad has held roles across government, consulting and multilaterals. Varad has done extensive work in financial inclusion, and writes a column in MINT (http://www.livemint.com/Search/Link/Author/Varad... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.02

14:15

Financial Inclusion of Marginalised Farmers through Risk Management (FIRM)
Limited Capacity seats available

Financial & Agri Risk Management [FARM]

In most emerging markets, the vast majority are excluded from mainstream financial services and must have their credit needs met by high cost lenders, if they are met at all. Efforts to drive financial inclusion by developing financial infrastructure have largely fallen short. For example, traditional credit bureaus in most emerging markets contain data only on the already banked, and often times only negative data such as delinquencies and defaults. Consequently, traditional bureaus offer little assistance to the estimated 4.5 billion “credit invisibles” globally, and can effectively serve as a tool of financial exclusion by proliferating blacklists to lenders.

FARM identifies predictive, non-financial data assets (nodes) excluded from traditional credit bureaus, and links (spoke) them to a central server (hub). The primary data asset used by FARM is the data collected by agents/micro- entrepreneurs that is proprietary to eKutir. This includes: plot soil quality; crop history; whether plot is irrigated; inputs used (herbicide, pesticide, seeds, fertilizer); crop quality; size of plot; crop yields; crop revenue by cycle; whether or not crops are financed; amount of financing; repayment history for crop financing; and behavioral data about the farmer (age of account, frequency of payment, compliance with crop advice, growth in yield over pre-relationship period). In addition, FARM will supplement the proprietary data asset with third party data from public and private sources. Initially, third party data will be from government agencies and from the agricultural supply chain (producer groups, cooperatives, suppliers/distributers) and gradually move towards other data sets like weather, geo-spatial mapping, mobile/utility subscriptions, public API stack [e.g. India Stack]. Using machine learning, FARM will create a self- perpetuating, intelligent scoring system for small farmers to identify their credit worthiness and for financial institutions to underwrite credit.

FARM is a derivative of eKutir’s agri platform.

Speakers
KC

Krishna Chandra Mishra

Founder Chairman, eKutir
ICT in Agriculture | Risk Score | Financing Agriculture through Risk Management


Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.01

14:15

Parametric insurance: how does big data and analytics save lives?
Limited Capacity seats available

Climate change, population growth, increased urban densities and the complex nature of today’s conflicts, has led to humanitarian crises becoming more frequent and more complicated than ever before.

To keep up with the worsening nature of humanitarian disasters, the way we respond must evolve. When a humanitarian crisis occurs it takes institutional donors an average of 80 days to disperse funds for interventions at scale. Funding is only triggered once a crisis has escalated and hits the front pages of the media. By this stage many lives have been lost and livelihoods destroyed.

Money is available, but the humanitarian industry paradigm about the occurrence of a crisis is still driven by “if” rather than “when” the crisis will happen. Acting early saves lives and costs, and we are at a critical juncture in shifting our humanitarian ecosystem from one of reactive response to proactive anticipation and risk management. Underpinning this are advances in early warning and scientific modelling that allow humanitarians to understand and quantify risks in their areas of operations.

The quantification of risk allows for an increasing number of innovative financial mechanisms that can enable systematic and collaborative pre-planning for disaster response, prediction of funding requirements, and disbursement of funds that are triggered objectively and pro-actively based on a set of humanitarian and crisis profile criteria. Building on this are new financial techniques for risk transfer and financing, such as parametric insurance, which can enable timely funds of sufficient quantity to be pre-positioned and released to enable the critical first phase of response by NGOs in a major crisis.

We will present during this session how risk transfer mechanism -particularly parametric insurance- are transformative of the humanitarian sector, then we will focus on the provision of early warning information with the support of ICT4D solutions and the collaboration between governments and NGOs resulting from this shared information provision, and the contribution to the SDGs.

Speakers
avatar for William Martin

William Martin

Technical Advisor Cash and Markets, Catholic Relief Services
Specialist of economic and early recovery in highly challenging contexts, William is responsible for supporting the development and implementation of markets-based and cash transfer programs for CRS’ emergency response around the globe. With more than 8 years of experience, his... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.04

14:15

Service contract tracking & alerting system
Limited Capacity seats available

Service contracts could be expired, or not renewed, goods/services procurement status and progress might not be known to requesters, the contracts/procurement manager could leave the organization after implementing a system that does not make sense to future managers, records could be too numerous to manage effectively. This could result in costly, unintended renewals to automatically go into effect or certain services cancelled and penalties incurred due to contract’s expiry.

The heavy burden of contracts management—and the risk that purely human management poses—has led Egypt Country Program (CP) to implement their contracts tracking and alerting system.

This system offers the ability to input data related to the contracts so that information can be quickly discovered and alerts can be set to warn managers of impending important events. The data added to the system for tracking purposes also serves an additional purpose: to facilitate finding additional information about contracts and procurement cases (quotations receiving date, P.O./Service contracts issuing date, goods/service delivery date, service contracts end date, vendor, contracts status, etc.…). Lastly, that data can be aggregated in numerous ways to help give a bird's-eye view of the state of the contracts.

This system promised time savings for operations team, decreased the time and effort needed for service contracts & procurement case tracking, increased auditability, helped missing events deadlines, and improved accessibility for goods/service requesters to track their cases' status and progress in real time.

Join us in this session to learn more about Egypt Country Program (CP) used Service Contracts tracking and alerting system to keep track of their core contracts and procurement cases that keep their operations afloat.

Speakers
avatar for Ali El Benni

Ali El Benni

Manager, Regional Information, Communications and Technology, Catholic Relief Services
| Email: ali.elbenni@crs.org | | | Ali El Benni is the Regional ICT Manager for the Europe Middle East and Central Asia (EMECA) region of Catholic Relief Services. | | Overseeing all EMECA Country Programs ICT operations and ICT4D Projects Ali’s responsibilities incl... Read More →
avatar for Ahmed Shoukry

Ahmed Shoukry

ICT Manager, Catholic Relief Services
Ahmed is working as an ICT Manager in the Catholic Relief Services, Egypt Country Program since 2013. Ahmed has more than 25 years of work experience in the ICT field, during these years he worked for several International organizations. Ahmed has a good knowledge about Monitorin... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.03

14:15

AtmaGo - neighbors helping neighbors build stronger communities
We started Atma two years ago to build resilience in urban poor communities and take a user centered approach to development. We have a team made up of very experienced technology professionals from the non-profit and for-profit sectors who came together because of frustration in the slow pace of non-profit technology development, and the lack of bottom-up, peer to peer solutions.

AtmaGo first launched as a way for people to share water prices, but users told us they wanted to share more information so we completely changed course and launched a new version. Unlike most non-profit technology projects, we take a lean, user-centered approach to product development—constantly getting user feedback and iterating.

By being constantly responsive to user needs, we have created a product that provides our users with tremendous value, is unique in the market, and is positioned to scale. Our goal is to reach the billions of people at the base of the economic pyramid in every region of the world so they can share information that will help them build their resilience and improve their communities from the ground up.

Atma’s award-winning app, AtmaGo, has reached over 156,000 users in Indonesia. More than 30,000 peer-to-peer information exchanges have been made on issues of water, food, jobs, education, shelter, terrorism, flooding, crime, and fires. AtmaGo solves the place-based needs of communities better than other social apps like Facebook, Twitter or WhatsApp because the content is geographically organized and useful.

Our research estimates that AtmaGo, at broad scale, could reduce flood damage by $28 to $85 million per incidence. More details on our impact framework and estimates are online: https://atmaconnect.org/772-2/

Speakers
avatar for Meena Palaniappan

Meena Palaniappan

Founder and CEO, Atma Connect
Meena Palaniappan is the Founder and CEO of Atma Connect, an award-winning global technology nonprofit focused on helping urban poor people connect, neighbor-to-neighbor. Atma Connect's social web app, AtmaGo, is a neighborhood-level mobile app in Indonesia for users to share rea... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
2.03

14:15

Improving quality of care through a mobile tool in Myanmar
Limited Capacity seats available

In Myanmar, midwives are the first line of skilled care for pregnant women/mothers, newborns, and children in the community. Improvement in reproductive, maternal, newborn, and child health (RMNCH) outcomes relies upon the ability of midwives to correctly counsel, provide service, follow-up, and refer urgent cases to higher levels of care. Significant challenges exist for midwives in terms of managing clients across various (often vertical) programs.

In this setting, where community health workers (i.e., frontline workers, FLWs) are families’ first contact with the health system, mHealth solutions have been shown to be a promising means to improving provider-client interactions. In Myanmar, in order to assist the Ministry of Health and Sports, JSI is working with Dimagi, with the support of UNICEF, to build a mobile tool to assist midwives in managing clients, following treatment protocols, reminding patients of appointments, and reporting on their activities.

This presentation will discuss the lessons learned from the collaborative process of designing a mobile application for national scale, as JSI, Dimagi and the MOHS have worked together to build a tool for all 11,000 midwives in Myanmar. The presentation will first provide an overview of the design process, then discuss the iterative process of incorporating user feedback, and then go on to outline preliminary data on from the first year of testing.

Speakers
avatar for Leona Rosenblum

Leona Rosenblum

Technical Advisor, John Snow, Inc.
Leona is a global health professional with seven years of experience designing, implementing, and evaluating health programs. Leona’s areas of focus include the application of mobile technology to solve public health challenges in maternal and child health, immunization, HIV/AI... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.06

14:15

mHealth experience from rigorous research to transformative scale
Limited Capacity seats available

Mobile phone technology is utilized for better delivery of health services worldwide. In low-and-middle income countries mobile phones are now ubiquitous. Thus, leveraging mHealth applications in health sector is becoming popular rapidly in these countries. CARE India also conducted Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) to assess the effectiveness of the Continuum of Care Services (CCS) through mHealth platform in terms of strengthening the delivery of maternal and child health (MCH) services in a district in Bihar, a resource-poor state in India. The intervention was rolled out in the Saharsa District of Bihar in eastern part of India in the month of June 2012 and the study completed in the month of August 2014 with 550+ frontline workers in the intervention area. The study results were promising which were later shared with Ministries of Women and Child Development to consider the mHealth application for scale up. With the additional features of this app being scaled in selected blocks/districts of eight states in India proposed to cover 100000+ Anganwadi workers in the name of ICDS Common Application Software (ICDS-CAS). CARE India has been selected to train the various stakeholders in those implementation states. We would like to share our experiences and challenges faced from rigorous research to large scale of mHealth app in ICT4D conference.

Speakers
avatar for RAMKRISHNAN BALAKRISHNAN

RAMKRISHNAN BALAKRISHNAN

ICT Expert, CARE India
Ram is working with CARE India as ICT Expert - to improve the quality of care and service delivery by leveraging technology as one of the core strategy. He is a Healthcare IT specialist having experience of implementing innovative healthcare Information Communication Technology p... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
2.01

14:15

Mitigating operating challenges in large scale preventive mHealth programs
Limited Capacity seats available

The Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action (MAMA) was launched in 2011 to catalyze the global community to deliver stage-based vital health information to new and expectant mothers and their families through mobile phones. The Bangladesh program Aponjon has already served 2 million women and their gate keepers since 2012. In addition to a 24/7 Doctor’s line and a mobile app, Aponjon is unique in terms of addressing sustainability through a subscription charge for subscribers who can pay. mMitra, of NGO ARMMAN in India, is a weekly/twice a week free voice call service providing information to more than 650,000 women, since inception in late 2014, through pregnancy and infancy in their chosen timeslot and language. Three tries for every message, a missed call system (if all three tries are missed), call center (to inform in case of delivery, miscarriage, change of timeslot or phone number), and HIV-AIDS and malnutrition customized programs add to the depth of the program. MAMA South Africa experimented with a 5 channel technology strategy (SMS, USSD, Mobisite, MXit and the Vodafone Live Operator Deck, VLive) to reach over 800,000 women within 3 years before the lessons and base technology from the program were used to create the national MomConnect program of the National Department of Health in 2014 which has now reached over 1 million mothers in 95% of South Africa clinics. The pilot phase of HelloMama, Nigeria, which commenced in 2015, is being implemented in Ebonyi and Cross River (41 sites; target: 15,000 women) before a nationwide scale-up.

The panel discussion will involve a representative from each country team collating and presenting the experiences of the four MAMA programs in mitigating the operational challenges faced in the key components of such large scale mHealth programs: Nigeria: Content; India: Implementation & Impact Assessment; South Africa: Technology and Bangladesh: Sustainability. The panel will leverage the wealth of experience within the four teams to disseminate valuable lessons learned that will benefit other nationwide mHealth programs.

Speakers
EA

Emmanuel Atuma

Project Director, Jhpiego/MCSP
Atuma has over 18 years’ experience in the development sector in Nigeria, spanning Reproductive Health, HIV/AIDS and Health Systems Strengthening; building institutional/organizational capacities of governments CSO’s and community structures for effective health response... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Aparna Hegde

Dr. Aparna Hegde

Founder, Chairperson and Managing Trustee, ARMMAN
Dr Aparna Hegde is the Founder of ARMMAN, a Mumbai-based mother and child health NGO. ARMMAN’s projects make innovative use of technology to achieve scale and have impacted more than 650,000 lives. Dr. Hegde is also is the Founder and Director of C.U.P (Center for Urogynecology a... Read More →
avatar for Debbie Rogers

Debbie Rogers

Managing Director, Praekelt.org
Debbie Rogers is the Managing Directorr for Praekelt Foundation. Prior to this, she was the General Manager  for the organisation, lead the Service Design Team and headed up the Health Portfolio. Her work at Praekelt has exposed her to both the commercial dimension of th... Read More →
avatar for Sankalita Shome

Sankalita Shome

Chief Operating Officer, Aponjon, Dnet
Sankalita is the Chief Operating Officer of Aponjon, an mHealth initiative of Dnet. She is currently focusing on transitioning the funded Aponjon project into a social enterprise. She has experience in visualizing the utilization of modern technology for designing interve... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
1.05

14:15

Using a mobile application to improve job satisfaction and motivation among Community Health Nurses in Ghana: A mixed methods evaluation
Community Health Nurses (CHNs) are paid frontline health workers in Ghana who provide community-based preventive and curative health care via “doorstep services” while residing in the community. They are faced with factors such as professional isolation and lack of support, which contribute to their lack of motivation—a critical potential challenge for CHNs. The Care Community Hub (CCH) pilot aims to provide the government of Ghana with an innovative solution to address barriers in health worker motivation through its mobile app “CHN on the Go” with modules designed to facilitate health worker learning, supervision and performance monitoring, communication and work activity planning, as well as to support health worker wellness. Implemented in five districts in the Greater Accra and Volta regions of Ghana, the objective is to improve the motivation and job satisfaction among CHNs and therefore contribute to improved quality of maternal newborn and child health care in the long term.

We present findings from a mixed method evaluation that analyzes survey data on CHN satisfaction and health knowledge, and in-depth interviews at baseline and endline. Qualitative data collection from CHNs, District Directors, and stakeholders including Ghana Health Service at multiple time points provide understanding of the implementation process along the pathways in the theory of change.

Results from the baseline provided information on the motivation, health knowledge, and needs of CHNs, which fed into the design of the project. Endline data provided critical information on the extent to which CHNs’ lives have changed and the associated reasons.

This study highlights a research, monitoring and evaluation approach involving on-going process documentation through the project lifetime, which can provide critical information to improve upon project design as well as understand the processes through which change in outcomes occur through the life of the project.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Ollis

Steve Ollis

Senior Digital Health Advisor, Maternal and Child Survival Program / JSI
Steve serves as Senior Digital Health Advisor for the Maternal and Child Survival Program. He provides technical leadership to support the integration of effective digital health solutions to help improve RMNCH program outcomes in the MCSP supported countries. He has designed... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 14:55
2.02

14:15

The Big Discussions: Education & Livelihoods, Partnerships & Collaborative Solutions
Limited Capacity seats available

Speakers
avatar for Ruxana Parvin Hossain

Ruxana Parvin Hossain

Sr. Manager-ICT in Education, Save the Children
Ruxana Hossain Parvin has been involved in exploring the effectiveness of ICT-infused education on classroom pedagogy, students’ learning and tracking students’ performances. She has over 17 years of experiences in designing, developing and leading educational projects for ch... Read More →
avatar for Sara Jacobs

Sara Jacobs

CEO, Project Connect
Sara most recently served as chief of staff of the foreign policy team for Secretary Hillary Clinton's campaign for President of the United States. She has previously worked in the Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations at the U.S. Department of State, and held several p... Read More →
avatar for Ayan Kishore

Ayan Kishore

Director, Technology for Development, Creative Associates International
Ayan Kishore is a social entrepreneur who has successfully built, grown and sold technology companies. At Creative Associates International, he leads the Creative Development Lab in the application of technology in development programs in education, violence prevention, workforce... Read More →
avatar for Prasenjit Kundu

Prasenjit Kundu

Executive Director, Anudip Foundation
Prasenjit Kundu holds a BTech degree in Mechanical Engineering from IIT Kharagpur and a MBA from IIM Calcutta. | | | | He is an entrepreneurial leader with a track record of over two decades with Fortune 100 and Indian Global ICT players. He has built a global IT solution... Read More →
avatar for Karin Tuxen-Bettman

Karin Tuxen-Bettman

Program Manager, Google Earth Outreach
Karin has been with Google since early 2008, and has since worked on the Google Earth Outreach team, helping nonprofit and public benefit organizations use Google's mapping tools for their work. Karin's background includes work in GIS and remote sensing technologies, which she ap... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:15 - 15:45
Hall 2

14:55

Transition Time
Tuesday May 16, 2017 14:55 - 15:00
HICC

15:00

AgTech for Smallholders: Keys to a Sustainable Business Model
Limited Capacity seats available

Lima Links is a for-profit Zambian company that offers a technology platform to connect farmers on basic phones to important market actors. In this presentation, we will cover key considerations to look at in regards to tech, partnerships, and business models that contribute to making a tech service for smallholders a viable business.

Speakers
avatar for Sophie Aigner

Sophie Aigner

Co-founder/Strategic Director, Lima Links
Sophie Aigner has extensive experience in agriculture in Southern Africa, most recently working under iDE to manage the start-up of a for-profit social enterprise in Zambia called Lima Links. Lima Links is using technology to revolutionize the way smallholder farmers trade in Zam... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.02

15:00

Digitizing the agricultural certification cycle
Limited Capacity seats available

Buyers at the end of agriculture supply chains want to know that the coffee, cocoa or other crops they're selling meet stringent quality and sustainability standards. Grameen Foundation is using TaroWorks software on mobile devices and the Salesforce cloud database to help programs certify farmers so they have better access to markets and to ultimately increase their income.

This presentation will review how the programs use the basic certification cycle (observation, evaluation, re-inspection), and delve into how mobile technology helps farmers certify their produce around the world by decreasing the time it takes for inspections to be completed and reported. Additionally, we will review how more advanced programs have managed multiple certifications for farmers in one system. Program examples will come from coconuts in the Philippines and coffee in Latin America.

Speakers
avatar for Elaine Chang

Elaine Chang

Sr. Manager, Global Market Development, TaroWorks
Elaine is the Sr. Manager for Global Market Development of TaroWorks, an offline mobile CRM tool designed for organizations coordinating with field staff working in the last mile. She has over 10 years of experience in data analytics, market research and client satisfaction, and... Read More →
avatar for Leo Tobias

Leo Tobias

Director, Technology, Grameen Foundation



Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.03

15:00

When advocacy works: Influencing through ICT and grassroots organizations
Limited Capacity seats available

Often times advocacy is an uphill battle, and it is not clear what messages are resonating. Digital Green, an international nonprofit that brings together technology and social organizations to improve agriculture and nutrition, was able to influence the National Rural Livelihood Mission of India and now works closely with the Government of Andhra Pradesh on more innovative work to modernize agricultural extension in the region. Join us for a conversation with Vijay Kumar Thallam, Special Chief Secretary of Agriculture and Cooperation of the Government of Andhra Pradesh, to understand why incorporating ICT approaches to development can lead to successful advocacy.

Speakers
avatar for Karin Lion

Karin Lion

Director, Global Agriculture Strategy, Digital Green
Karin Lion joined Digital Green as the Director of Global Agriculture Strategy in August 2016. Prior to that she was a Program Officer for 8 years with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle, Washington, specializing in seed sector development and input delivery. She has... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.01

15:00

Data-first: Employing a pro-digital business model in analog activities
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

There are three common features to every development project, regardless of sector, geography or problem being addressed: data capture, information flow and financial transactions. Every activity employs these elements, some better than others. No activity does this perfectly.

Arguably, the use of proven, low-cost and widely available digital technologies remarkably enhances how data is collected and analyzed, how information moves -- particularly to end-users -- and how money flows. And the status quo of not employing these tools limits development projects from achieving their full potential.

But what does it mean to be data-first and data-driven through a digital lens? And how do you go about it? This presentation will explore existing evidence in support of greater efficiencies, cost reductions and increased impact as a result of the use of digital tools. It will draw heavily from agricultural projects but will also look at other sectors to make the case. Further, it will call participants to action in furthering the evidence base for being data/digital first and will outline the steps for incorporating other projects into a body of knowledge that advances the ICT4D sector.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Burns

Christopher Burns

Sr. Coordinator, Digital Development for Feed the Future, USAID
Christopher Burns is the Senior Coordinator, Digital Development for Feed the Future. In this capacity, he leads a nimble technical team within the U.S. Global Development Lab, working alongside the Bureau for Food Security, to integrate a suite of digital technologies into Feed... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.05

15:00

Mobile phone surveys for global non-communicable disease surveillance: Exploring the ethical challenges
Limited Capacity seats available

The use of mobile technology for public health has expanded greatly in the last decade. Mobile phone penetration has grown globally, and particularly within low- and middle- income countries (LMICs), presenting an opportunity to augment routine health surveillance programs. Under the Bloomberg Data for Health initiative, Johns Hopkins mHealth researchers and several LMIC and global health partners are developing basic mobile phone-based surveys of non-communicable disease (NCD) risk factors utilizing various survey modalities (e.g., text messaging, interactive voice response and computer assisted telephone interviews) to better understand NCD burdens globally.

The increasing use of such technology in LMICs brings forth a cluster of ethical challenges; however, much of the existing literature regarding the ethics of mobile or digital health focuses on the use of technologies in high-income countries or does not consider directly the specific ethical issues associated with the conduct of NCD mobile phone surveys in LMICs. This session will introduce ongoing Johns Hopkins NCD mobile phone survey research and development activities, explore several of the central ethics issues that arise when conducting mobile phone surveys of NCD risk factors in LMICs, and present some preliminary data on attitudes of key stakeholders towards the emerging issues.  


Speakers
avatar for Joseph Ali

Joseph Ali

Research Scholar, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Joseph Ali JD is Research Scholar with the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and Associate in the Dept of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health. His work addresses ethics and regulatory challenges associated with international research, from in... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
G.06

15:00

Cultivating sustainable BoP financial inclusion mobile solutions
Limited Capacity seats available

Most digital financial inclusion (DFS) social enterprises (SE) have perfected, or near perfected their 'reason for being' pitch articulating theory of change to move along the impact value chain from Input-Output-Outcome-Impact (I-O-O-I). DFS SEs are keenly looking at growth model scenarios, implications of growth on financing structures, and access to impact investment among others. We will apply the INSIMA Impact Investment Readiness Framework and utilize a real life BoP FinTech's growth example with an end goal to discuss and share insights into how DFS social businesses can capture value and access impact investment.

Solutions to address financial inclusion can be scaled and accelerated working with FinTechs, and in public-private partnerships to achieve impact. Sustaining those solutions beyond the lifetime of the project can be achieved through strategically pivoting the solution providers to grow their businesses, generate revenue, and attract investment.

We take a Ugandan BoP FinTech's five year journey developing suitable Savings and Credit Cooperative Organization (SACCO) software solution, integrating the SACCO MIS with Mobile Network Operator mobile money environment, including feature phone mobile solutions for savings/deposits, withdrawal, balance checks, and SACCO loan application over USSD platforms. Will focus on the facets that made the co-investment sustainable beyond SDC/Mercy Corps Agri-Fin Mobile Program funding to enable the FinTech grow, attract equity investment, sustainable revenue streams and expansion to international markets.

The learnings point to the key ingredients in identifying scalable BoP solutions, pivoting them to grow, become investment ready and positioning them to be sustainable.

Speakers
avatar for Ronald Rwakigumba

Ronald Rwakigumba

Agri-Fin Mobile Country Coordinator, Mercy Corps
Working with partners to scale sustainable models, where farm/crop management tools and financial services are commercially delivered on appropriate digital/mobile platforms to promote agricultural productivity, and financial inclusion. | | Building upon earlier experience w... Read More →


INSIMA JPG

Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.02

15:00

Cash, data and HXL in emergencies
Limited Capacity seats available

Cash distributions are rapidly becoming the go-to response mechanism for most organisations in emergencies as they present opportunities not previously seen in humanitarian settings. More and more data around Cash Programming projects is being collected digitally, leading to various organisations collecting large quantities of data. While this data may or may not be necessary to collect in the manner and quantities currently prevailing, there is need to coordinate and share information among various actors, particularly in emergency contexts where there is need to move fast, use resources efficiently and reach as many of the affected population as possible.

The Humanitarian Exchange Language (HXL) is a standard that makes use of uniform hashtags to allow organisations to share and process critical data in a simple way. This allows an actor to access crucial data that already exists about a location as collected by other agencies. It reduces the amount of resources required to collect information on markets, population movements and price fluctuations and visualize this information in maps and other formats. Protection information, as well as data around spending patterns can also be shared.

This is the direction that humanitarian actors should be taking in order to improve coordination in responses, and get the best value for money for the affected populations. Working together will also allow actors to collectively work to solve the challenges associated with data protection and privacy, particularly in relation to populations in conflict zones.

But what will it take to get everyone on board?

Speakers
avatar for Priscilla Chomba-Kinywa

Priscilla Chomba-Kinywa

Global Advisor - Tech & Innovation, DanChurchAid
With 15 years' experience working in the tech and innovation space within large organisations such as WFP and UNICEF, Priscilla now works as DanChurchAid's Global Advisor on all things Tech & Innovation. This includes working with local partners in countries in Africa, Asia and t... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.04

15:00

Lessons from scale - Unique considerations & challenges of mHealth scale up
Limited Capacity seats available

A common goal of mHealth interventions is to achieve some level of scale. Despite this, to date very few mHealth interventions have achieved any kind of meaningful scale. This failure to achieve meaningful scale means that there is a gap in the sector’s collective knowledge of what is involved in the successful scale up of a mHealth intervention.



Dimagi is currently a leader the mHealth and ICT4D sector in realizing the goal to scale projects to large user bases. Dimagi is actively working with Indian and other governments on a range of national scale projects, equipping 10s of thousands of frontline workers with mobile job aids, in India, Myanmar, and other countries globally. The shared learnings from these projects finally shed light on the method and the challenges involved in deploying a mHealth solution at scale.



In this presentation, Dimagi’s Lily Olson will describe the process of designing and implementing a national scale mHealth intervention. Participants will learn about the unique considerations involved in implementing at mHealth at scale, including the process of going from pilot to scale. The presentation will explore the enormous challenges involved in deploying a mHealth project at scale such as how pilot interventions evolve for scale up, lessons learned in aligning the large number of partners necessary to enable scale up, the close collaboration with government at the central, state and local level, building mHealth training capacity, aligning an intervention with national policy, collaboration opportunities with mobile device manufacturers, and developing an app appropriate for users across diverse geographies.

Speakers
avatar for Lily Olson

Lily Olson

Program Manager, Dimagi
Lily is entering her third year in Delhi, as a Project Manager for Cambridge-based social enterprise Dimagi, Inc. Her main focus at Dimagi is a project for the Government of India aimed at equipping village-level workers with cell-phone tools to digitize paper records of pregnant... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.05

15:00

Mobile technology to empower community health workers
Limited Capacity seats available

The Mobenzi mHealth WBOT solution has been aligned with the South African National Primary Healthcare re-engineering programme implemented by the National Department of Health and digitises all the official stationery, workflows and reports which underpin the WBOT mandate. This solution is in use by over 40 teams in the North-West Province (since 2012) and, more recently, the Western Cape.

An integrated system coordinates the end-to-end solution which spans messaging, data collection, workflow, health systems interoperability, reporting, point-of-care decision support and mobile capacity-building.

Operationalising Data on web interfaces provide real-time management information for team leaders and supervisors to all WBOT activity allowing them to track team performance, provide assistance and support. All reports and stats are available, with the ability to drill down to individual household or client level data.

Objectives of the WBOT Solution:
• Ability for field staff to work offline with data synchronisation taking place automatically in the background
• Complete case management, intuitive data collection, real-time validation, and decision-support
• Workflow automation to enable referrals, client care management and complementary long-running processes
• Integrated remote support, device and connectivity management

Speakers
avatar for Marc Katzwinkel

Marc Katzwinkel

Account Manager, Mobenzi Technologies
After embarking on a BA LLB (Law) degree at The University of Cape Town in 2008 I started my working career in online marketing at Click2Customers as an Account Manager. I then expanded my focus in this field as the head digital strategist at HelloComputer looking at alternatives to Google Adwords; mobile and social media advertising etc. This then took me to Praekelt consulting where I project managed several activations for Brandhouse and SABC. In late 2013 I started at Mobenzi Technologies, still based in Cape Town, as an Account Manager. I have assisted in the scoping of several small... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
2.02

15:00

Towards equitable & inclusive health
Limited Capacity seats available

India's progress in digitalization is catalytic for positive health outcomes . World Vision India works with Government, private and community partners to address Health and Nutrition of our women and children Our community based interventions have undergone a paradigm shift with introduction of digital solutions to make health, a household responsibility.

It is estimated that 1 million TB cases are missing in India. WV India works with Revised National TB program, supported by GFATM in Axshya project in 8 states of India along with other partners to identify those with symptoms of TB to facilitate timely management . Digitisation is done through Axshya Mobile Application, Web Interface and Mapping. Till date, about 6400 TB patients are registered. Key lessons : Transparent and quality data is available. Rapid use of mobile applications at scale within a grant funded project is challenging, dependent on users.

The first 1000 days of a child's life are important for her overall development into a productive and healthy adult. Starting Strong in Narsinghpur in Madhya Pradesh deployed mobile phone technology using ODK for monitoring malnourished children and pregnant women with job aid for Government front line workers. Project tracks about 1800 children. Key lessons : On-site development of solutions by technology partner must be based on digital development principles. It is empowerment tool - for women.

Bangalore is the dynamic city in India. The City Health department (Bruhat Bengaluru Mananagara palike( BBMP) partners with WV India for Sishu Janani Seva ( funded by Baxter Foundation). An android based mobile application is used for monitoring pregnant women and children below 2 years of age by health assistants, synchronised to a web app built on PHP open source. SMS alerts are provided for health check-up/ immunisation dates. Currently, more than 790 clients are registered online. Key lessons: Local Government's design input is critical for success. Many high-risk pregnancies can be managed well. On-the job support for health assistants is a challenge.

Speakers
avatar for ANITA VICTOR

ANITA VICTOR

Director -Health, World Vision International
Public Health professional. Currently Team leader for Health division in World Vision India. HIV Physician. Ex-Army doctor. Medical graduate from Christian Medical College, Vellore. Excited by medical advancement and use of technology as amazing tools to make public health better... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
2.01

15:00

Using mobile tools for frontline outbreak surveillance
Limited Capacity seats available

Medic Mobile, along with our partners Living Goods (LG), aims to support community health workers (CHWs) and create a novel, community-based outbreak surveillance system. The envisioned system will facilitate door-to-door outbreak surveillance, provide decision support for CHWs and families, and enable rapid reporting of potential outbreaks.

Medic Mobile’s open-source, offline-enabled mobile app includes decision support for CHWs as they provide door-to-door care, shows an automated and integrated task list based on actions and configured rules, displays profiles and context for the people served by each CHW, and gives CHWs access to a mobile dashboard showing their progress towards goals.

In 2017, Medic Mobile will integrate outbreak reporting into Living Goods’ existing app for CHWs, automate sharing for indicator-based and event-based surveillance data, and co-design alerts and follow-up systems with surveillance units and the Ministries of Health in Uganda and Kenya. To our knowledge, this would be the first outbreak reporting tool embedded within an integrated, comprehensive CHW application and the first community-based surveillance system in either country to leverage mobile technology.

In the planned system, CHWs will be trained by LG to identify symptoms for epidemic-prone illnesses such as measles, meningitis, VHF, cholera, and AFP. CHWs will be able to report symptoms within the Medic Mobile app, using a new “action” made available on any community member’s profile. Reports will be forwarded immediately to the Integrated Disease Surveillance Response (IDSR) system or established surveillance contacts.

Medic Mobile, Ministries of Health, and our partners aim to decrease the time to detect those priority diseases, improve global health security, contain outbreaks, and protect the health of citizens. This presentation will discuss our progress in this project to date by sharing learnings and data.

Speakers
avatar for Jacqueline Edwards

Jacqueline Edwards

Chief Operating Officer, Medic Mobile
Jacqueline previously worked in partnerships and strategic initiatives in the Global Tobacco Control Branch at CDC and as a Senior Program Officer focused on public-private partnerships at the CDC Foundation. She has focused on community led program development across diverse ini... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:00 - 15:45
1.06

15:45

Coffee & Tea Break
Tuesday May 16, 2017 15:45 - 16:15
Hall 4

16:15

Open geospatial data for positive global impact
Limited Capacity filling up

Maps provide an understanding of the past and are magical bridges to the future, connecting ideas to global stewardship and positive human impact. Indeed, over the last decade, the value of using geospatial data to support global development and improve decision-making among practitioners, have progressively been acknowledged as essential. It is also the reason why the call for ‘open geospatial data’ has gained momentum amongst various sectors, including global development. However, despite the positive global impact of earth observation to assist sustainable development work, the imagery market remains highly fragmented, lacks transparency, and the data are difficult to discover and use.

Working with partners that share its vision, Radiant.Earth emerged to provide a technology platform and support knowledge transfer to positively impact the developing world’s greatest social, economic and environmental challenges using geospatial technology. The platform permits users to illuminate earth, literally, to allow everywhere to be ‘seen’; to turn the telescopes back on human activity as we enter the Anthropocene period; and to give decision-makers a scientific window into understanding global activity better. Providing the world with these tools and data can create and accelerate powerful insights – and greater catalytic, evidence-based support for change.

Radiant.Earth provides solutions to earth observation usability obstacles for positive global impact: It simplifies the overall process across the value chain of using geospatial data; it exposes imagery across the globe, date and spectrum; it provides technology and tools to do analyze geospatial data, thereby improving the usage of data for greater impact; it works with the community to create new, open standards; and it focuses thought leadership, market analytics and capacity development programs.

Speakers
avatar for Anne Hale Miglarese

Anne Hale Miglarese

CEO, Radiant.Earth
Anne Hale Miglarese is the founding CEO of Radiant.Earth, a Washington DC based non-profit. Anne has extensive government and private sector experience particularly in the GIS, Remote Sensing and Geospatial field. Prior to joining Radiant.Earth, Anne served as CEO of PlanetiQ, Ea... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.01

16:15

The role of social media for off-farm businesses
Limited Capacity seats available

The invention of Internet, especially wireless communication technologies has triggered the growth of global economy and improved the income of different types of businesses. We can say that humankind is now almost entirely connected on Internet. People are using social media and Instant Messaging platforms enabled on their smart hand-held devices, hence facilitating them to get information necessary for businesses.

Globally, time spent on social networking sites surpassed time spent on e-mail in November 2007, and the number of social networking users surpassed the number of e-mail users in July 2009. Today, social networking sites are the preferred platforms for all kinds of activities, both business and personal, and sociability has dramatically increased — but it is a different kind of sociability

In this spirit, Rural communities practicing off-farm businesses got trained on the use of ICT Tools and Services (especially using Facebook), then facilitated to have access to Internet through Community Knowledge Centers (CKCs), that they may access market information for selling their products and services. After only one year, community witnesses the role of using ICT services and tools for development of their businesses, hence impacting their lives. Today, It is not necessary to pay for a rent of a shopping place, as it simple to create an electronic store platform which can link the business and customers in easy, quick and flexible manner.

Today, the gap in linkage between business and market was filled. It is obviously crucial to use and benefit from current communication technologies for growth in economy.

Therefore, The Internet and the Web constitute the technological infrastructure of the global economic growth, and the understanding of their logic is a key field of research. It is only from success stories of community that will enable us to cut through the myths surrounding this digital communication technology.

Speakers
avatar for Keith Bunyenyezi

Keith Bunyenyezi

IT Manager, World Vision International
I am a double Masters' Degree (MSc. Information Systems & MSc. Information Technology), BSc. Computer Engineering and Information Technology. I am professionally certified in Project Management and ICT Projects Monitoring and Evaluation. I have been working for World Vision Int... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.02

16:15

Using ICT to reach farmers in their own language
Limited Capacity seats available

For Access Agriculture -

it must be visual,
it must be for farmers
it must feature farmers
it must be in local languages.

The "farmer to farmer" video platform is approaching its fifth birthday and has many stories to share.
Videos being distributed by DJ's onto $10 mobile phones.
Farmers paying for DVD's to improve their incomes.
Farmers copying the steps shown on the videos to grow and market new crops
Using the videos to improve household incomes
Watching quality videos in remote locations without electricity, internet or mobile phone connection.

A full demonstration of how Access Agriculture can reach farmers using local languages will be provided. How can the "smart projector" improve the reach of videos and effectiveness. How come the DVD is not yet dead.

Speakers
avatar for Phil Malone

Phil Malone

Co-founder, Access Agriculture
Phil Malone is an ex-BBC broadcaster and Communication Consultant. He has worked extensively in production of agricultural video programmes and for the past 12 years has trained others in production. | | He helped form Access Agriculture in 2012 to concentrate on "farmer to fa... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.03

16:15

Mobile data collection & monitoring: The good, bad & hope for the future
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Evidence-based programming is the core of most international development projects. Over the past 3 years, World Vision Canada (WV) has moved beyond paper based systems to a digital approach for monitoring and evaluation in an attempt to improve efficiency and data quality. Use includes small surveys of health facilities to large scale baseline surveys with twenty thousand participants. WV has made great strides in improving data quality and plausibility, but still face challenges with data storage, security and ownership rights, as well as meta-analysis and interface across platforms. WV has compiled lessons learned from numerous large-scale surveys conducted, leveraging different functionalities of the Open Data Kit platform. WV has tried many different methods to specifically improve data quality of anthropometry measurement including the use of digital scales, programming Z-Score calculation directly into mobile device and building in plausible data ranges, as well as increased training on mobile data collection. Increasing adoption on the use of mobile data collection by field staff has been a challenge. Strategies employed to overcome these challenges have included capacity building around survey design, the use of tutorial videos for enumerators, and development of recommended data collection policy and procedures. Overall, mobile data collection improved quality and access to real time data, and was shown to be cost-saving for WV.

Given the improvement on efficiency and data quality, WV is now developing an enhanced web-based data discovery and visualization portal for the various WV grant data stores to provide transparency into activities. The aim is to improve the transparency, completeness, historical accuracy, and timeliness of data on grants via a highly usable tool that makes such data available to the international development community, meeting the need to provide high-quality evidence on maternal and child health and nutrition programming globally.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Main

Barbara Main

Public Health Specialist, World Vision International
Barbara Main is a nurse-midwife with extensive experience supporting maternal and child health and nutrition programming in several countries of Africa and Asia, including nine years based in Cambodia. She holds a Master of Public Health from Curtin University of Technology, Aust... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.05

16:15

Politics and design of KPIs and MIS
Limited Capacity seats available

Key Performance Indicators or KPIs hold significant power in shaping the discussion around policies at an operational and M&E level. They've become the lingua franca between various stakeholders.

Questions pertaining to what needs to be captured in a MIS and how, in what granularity and how will it be eventually displayed are important questions which aren't necessarily in the purview of engineering but often end up in.

The speaker will attempt to theorize and contemplate on the importance of KPIs and the interaction between KPIs and bureaucracy at different levels of hierarchy. As one moves higher up in the management, the number of KPIs which can be reviewed reduce drastically while the extent of the program needing to be covered is maximized. But at the same time, as the extent of a KPI increases, the nature of the information and the objectivity which can be represented changes.

The talk will provide insights into the development of MIS systems in a government setting and highlight certain features which are important but are often overlooked in the design of MIS systems.

With increasing complexity of government schemes, push for data-driven feedback mechanisms and accountability, MIS systems have become an important member of government bureaucracy. In some cases, they are assumed prerequisites in the design of policies and operational procedures. Hence it is important to critically look at their design and politics.

Speakers
avatar for Harsh Nisar

Harsh Nisar

Data Scientist, IFMR LEAD
Harsh has a background in data, machine learning and public policy. He currently works for IFMR LEAD. He is deputed to the Ministry of Rural Development to develop operational strategies, streamlining M&E policy and scoping technology tools for a major employment scheme. In the... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.04

16:15

Water monitoring sensors for increased efficiency for community projects
Limited Capacity seats available

Sustainability of water infrastructure is highly dependent on sound operation and maintenance. Studies in several developing countries have shown that for all water points constructed, half of them will breakdown within one year of installation. Timely response to water supply system break downs and accountable revenue collection are essential to ensure sustainable water supply to target communities.

This presentation provides information and case studies on use of water point monitoring sensors to increase efficiency in revenue collection and maintenance while entrenching transparency in the operations of community and government managed water systems.

Catholic Relief Services and its partners have installed water point monitoring sensors that relay functionality and water abstraction data on a daily basis. The sensors have been installed on boreholes in remote villages of Northern Kenya. Most parts of Northern Kenya have poor cellular network connection hence the developers of the technology came up with an ingenious sensor that transmits data over satellite connection.

Data generated from the sensors has been useful in advising the pump mechanic on potential break down of the borehole pump hence encouraging timely response to repair any part of the system that could be breaking down. On the other hand, water abstraction (quantity) data generated by the sensors assists in confirming water sales on a daily, weekly or monthly. This contributes to accountability and transparency in revenue collection.

With further developments of this system, aquifer levels and water quality data could be generated periodically to inform future water point developments and water safety/health in a locality.

Speakers
avatar for Styvers Kathuni

Styvers Kathuni

Program Manager - WASH, Catholic Relief Services
Styvers is the head of the WASH unit at CRS Kenya with over 8 years’ experience in designing and implementing WASH emergency and development projects. He has extensive experience with innovative approaches in water point operation and maintenance. Currently, he also oversees Ke... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
G.06

16:15

Designing for the mass market customer
Limited Capacity seats available

Nearly 2 billion people are excluded from the formal financial sector. Many have simple goals for their financial health. Yet a large number of mass market products and services fall short of their expectations. Human Centred Design (HCD) can help to address underserved markets for which there is a lack of data regarding existing behavior, or for which needs and preferences are poorly understood. The talk highlights how personas can help to decode the mass market into meaningful segments, that are the first step to creating high adoption products and services.

Speakers
avatar for Priti Rao

Priti Rao

India Creative Lead, Dalberg Design
Priti is a Creative Lead at Dalberg Design India. Her expertise lies in helping organisations become purpose-led, and building a culture of innovation to compete in rapidly changing global markets. She’s partnered closely with clients such as Samsung, Nike, Dr.Reddy’s, Ta... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.03

16:15

Digital Financial Services for the emerging middle class in India
Limited Capacity seats available

Current market indicators in India suggest that conditions are increasingly favorable for the emergence and expansion of successful Digital Financial Services (DFS) ecosystems and that the country is expected to experience exponential growth in the DFS sector in the near term. Further, DFS has the potential to dramatically accelerate access to, and deepen the penetration of, formal financial services in India.

This is particularly true for the Emerging Middle Class (EMC) that resides in less urban areas along the periphery of Tier 1 cities, referred to as Tier 2, 3, and 4 centers.

Given their size as a population segment, shifting life goals and aspirations, and growing income levels, the EMC is also likely to play the role of catalyst in mainstreaming DFS adoption and usage. That said, service providers are still in the early stages of experimenting with different models, service offerings, and products to best meet the needs of specific market segments, which exhibit distinct attitudes, abilities, and behavior patterns.

Speakers
avatar for Isha Singh

Isha Singh

Program Manager: Payments Innovation, NetHope
Isha is currently working as NetHope’s India Program Manager for their Payments Innovation team. | | She is a management consultant with Deloitte India, and her recent work has been focused on Payments and banking in financial services industry in India. Prior to this she ha... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.02

16:15

Beneficiary vulnerability data sharing in a disaster response context
Limited Capacity seats available

One of the biggest challenges faced by humanitarian agencies is the ability to share beneficiary information in a disaster context. Inefficiency brought about by duplication of effort and data often result. Other impediments to effective data sharing include a lack of capacity to use the technology tools within the humanitarian agency; organizational culture that may impede efforts to share data, differing levels of controls amongst participating organizations and the associated cost of data sharing.

Against this backdrop, this presentation will look at considerations related to and present a use case for sharing beneficiary data within a disaster context, drawing from a combination of research and field experience.

Speakers
avatar for Keith Chibafa

Keith Chibafa

Head of Business Development (LMMS), World Vision International
Keith Chibafa joined WV International in 2010 after a career in the private sector. He is responsible for overseeing World Vision International’s (WVI) efforts to collaborate with key local and international entities interested in the implementation and execution of WVI’s Las... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.04

16:15

Cash, data and HXL in emergencies
Limited Capacity seats available

Cash distributions are rapidly becoming the go-to response mechanism for most organisations in emergencies as they present opportunities not previously seen in humanitarian settings. More and more data around Cash Programming projects is being collected digitally, leading to various organisations collecting large quantities of data. While this data may or may not be necessary to collect in the manner and quantities currently prevailing, there is need to coordinate and share information among various actors, particularly in emergency contexts where there is need to move fast, use resources efficiently and reach as many of the affected population as possible.

The Humanitarian Exchange Language (HXL) is a standard that makes use of uniform hashtags to allow organisations to share and process critical data in a simple way. This allows an actor to access crucial data that already exists about a location as collected by other agencies. It reduces the amount of resources required to collect information on markets, population movements and price fluctuations and visualize this information in maps and other formats. Protection information, as well as data around spending patterns can also be shared.

This is the direction that humanitarian actors should be taking in order to improve coordination in responses, and get the best value for money for the affected populations. Working together will also allow actors to collectively work to solve the challenges associated with data protection and privacy, particularly in relation to populations in conflict zones.

But what will it take to get everyone on board?

Speakers
avatar for Priscilla Chomba-Kinywa

Priscilla Chomba-Kinywa

Global Advisor - Tech & Innovation, DanChurchAid
With 15 years' experience working in the tech and innovation space within large organisations such as WFP and UNICEF, Priscilla now works as DanChurchAid's Global Advisor on all things Tech & Innovation. This includes working with local partners in countries in Africa, Asia and t... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.05

16:15

Bridging the distance: Mobile mentorship for vulnerable girls in India
Limited Capacity seats available

Mentoring works. But it’s time-consuming, expensive and difficult to scale. In an attempt to replicate an evidence-based analogue mentoring programme, Girl Effect, Praekelt.org and Mentor Together collaborated to create a new mobile mentoring programme—Mentor To Go— that attempts to overcome the distance, both literal and metaphorical, between vulnerable young girls and female mentors.

Building on Mentor Together’s tried-and-tested curriculum and offline mentorship programme, Mentor to Go leverages mobile technologies to reach girls in under-resourced environments in India. Girls are often denied access to mentorship for many reasons, including a shortage of female mentors, limits on their mobility, and programmes not catered to their needs. Mentor To Go overcomes these and other obstacles by providing girls and female mentors with a way to connect via mobile.

Female mentors, recruited via social media, undergo digital training and vetting before downloading an android app that provides them with the curriculum, guidance and a way of calling their mentees — for free. Once girls have been matched with a mentor, using a sophisticated algorithm, they use simple handsets to speak with their mentors and to engage with an interactive voice response (IVR) service that monitors their progress. Strict data safety and security protocols ensure that girls are protected and that the relationships are monitored closely.

Through this innovative solution, Mentor To Go improves the confidence of girls while providing them with life-skills they can use to fulfill their potential. With results from the pilot proving promising, the mobile platform is set to expand.

This case study will demonstrate how human-centered design was used to develop a technological equivalent of an existing offline programme and show how the Principles for Digital Development helped guide its creation. The presentation will also examine some of the early results from the pilot programme to suggest how technology can play a role in improving gender equity.

Speakers
avatar for Namrata Baruah

Namrata Baruah

COO, Mentor Together
Namrata works at Mentor Together as its Chief Operating Officer. In her role, she oversees overall operations and has also led the creation of Mentor Together’s Work-Skills Mentoring Programme. In addition, Namrata contributes to the development of innovative programmes like t... Read More →
avatar for Indrani Vedula

Indrani Vedula

Program Manager, Praekelt.org
As the Program Manager for Praekelt.org in India for the past 4 and a half years, Indrani leads the Program production management for the Girl Effect Mobile (GEM) Initiative. The GEM portfolio of projects has implementations in India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Rwanda, Ethiopia and S... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
2.02

16:15

Creating a cashless economy in a humanitarian setting
Limited Capacity seats available

Save the Children has partnered with Segovia and a local telecommunications company, Cellulant, to create a brand new ‘digital wallet,’ enabling cash-less transactions between Save the Children beneficiaries and local vendors. In a high-risk environment, like Northeast Nigeria, this approach gives beneficiaries the flexibility to choose the date and time to redeem their mobile vouchers, while mitigating protection risks that might arise from the need to distribute large amounts of cash.

As the use of this digital wallet was new for Save, beneficiaries and vendors, Save initially piloted the project to 450 households to ensure the technology was fit for purpose; beneficiaries properly understood their rights and redress mechanisms; and that vendors were satisfied with the transaction process. The pilot was so successful, with no failed transactions and a process universally praised by those involved, that Save decided to scale the transfers to over 11,000 households and incorporate additional activities funded by multiple donors.

For beneficiaries, the digital wallet allows them to use the transfer amount to select from a list of food items, the quantity and quality of which they decide for themselves. If beneficiaries are unhappy with prices or quality, they’re welcome to choose other vendors in the network, or buy different foods. They can also use the entire transfer amount or save parts of it, if they don’t have the means or need to purchase a month’s worth of rations at once.

For Save, benefits beyond the reduction in risk are the real-time transaction data that is generated by the system, allowing Save to better understand and respond to beneficiary preference. Transfers are managed directly by Save, eliminating the need for cumbersome interactions with private sector actors, and they’re tracked in real-time within a platform that creates an auditable trail of every log-in and transaction.

Speakers
avatar for Nick Anderson

Nick Anderson

Associate Director, Emergency Food Security and Livelihoods, Save the Children
Nick Anderson is a humanitarian professional with over ten years’ experience in humanitarian response, emergency food security and livelihoods, community development, program management, and education. As Associate Director of Emergency Food Security and Livelihoods at Save the... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
1.01

16:15

Improving reading through digital platforms
Limited Capacity seats available

The Ghana Reads project leverages the transformative power of technology to leapfrog existing challenges that prevent children from learning to read. World Vision is working with Open Learning Exchange to implement this project in five districts; Kintampo South, Sekyere East, Afram Plains, Fanteakwa and Krachi West. Project components include teacher pedagogical capacity building, integration of technology, and a coaching model. The hardware which includes Basic e-Learning Library (BeLL)) is an extensive offline digital library of free, high quality content, including rich multimedia educational resources, suitable for the Ghanaian context. The library is automatically updated and synchronized from a national repository of either Open Educational Resources (OER), resources developed by OLE Ghana and/or licensed for all Ghanaian primary schools when there is available internet access. Materials in the Basic e-Learning Library (BeLL) have been developed in conformity with the Curriculum Research and Development Division (CRDD) standards. Children are assigned stories and other learning tasks with the help of a content management system, and the feedback functionality in BeLL system ensures effective monitoring of children’s reading progress as well as other program activities via a Feedback Portal. In the initial scale-up in 8 schools in Afram Plains and Kintampo South, users had an increase of 9% from baseline figure of 3% on the Early Grade Reading assessment for children who can read with comprehension at grade 3. Enrollment rates in target schools increased 20%, with 12% of total transfers from other schools and 8% new entrants. Though no data was collected on attendance, teachers affirmed that school attendance has increased.. The World Bank has sponsored a team from the Gambian Ministry of Basic& Secondary Education led by their Permanent Secretary to study the Ghana Reads Project with the aim of replicating it in Gambia with World Bank support.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Ofosu-Dankyi

Andrew Ofosu-Dankyi

Education Technical Programme Manager, World Vision International
The writer, Andrew Ofosu-Dankyi currently doubles as the Regional Literacy capacity building coordinator for World Vision West Africa Region and Country Education Specialist for Ghana. He has worked extensively as classroom teacher for early grades as well as literacy trainer wit... Read More →


Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
2.01

16:15

Digital health: Government leadership & cooperation between ICT and health
Limited Capacity seats available

The Broadband Commission Working Group on Digital Health is co-chaired by the Novartis Foundation and Nokia. The Working Group commissioned Vital Wave to conduct research and to interview digital health leaders from twenty countries to explore the role governments play in developing and implementing digital health. This report documents the results of the exploration with a view to providing practical guidance on leadership, governance and intragovernmental cooperation to leaders in health and ICT who will to adopt a digital health strategy. The work conducted in consultation with the Working Group produced 8 case studies of countries that have achieved success in developing and implementing digital health strategies that can provide insights and takeaways to other countries wishing to join the digital health community. This session will present the findings of the report.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Florey

Carolyn Florey

Director, Collective Impact, Digital Impact Alliance
Carolyn is the Director of Collective Impact for the Digital Impact Alliance (DIAL). In this role, she helps coalesce the development community around scaling and increasing the impact and cost effectiveness of digital development investments. Prior to joining the Digital Impact... Read More →



Tuesday May 16, 2017 16:15 - 16:55
2.03

16:15